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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Blockade. (search)
molest any vessels, belonging to neutral powers, bound to any port or place within the jurisdiction of the United States. Early in June, 1814, British blockading vessels began depredations on the coast of Massachusetts, under an order issued by Admiral Cochrane to destroy the seaport towns and devastate the country. At Wareham, on Buzzard's Bay, they destroyed stroyed vessels and other property valued at $40. 000. In the same month fifty armed men in five large barges entered the Saco River, Maine, and destroyed property to the amount of about $20,000 New Bedford, and Fair Haven opposite, were threatened by British cruisers. Eastport and Castine, in Maine, were captured by the British. In July, 1814/un>, Sir Thomas M. Hardly sailed from Halifax with a considerable land and naval force. to execute the order of Cochrane. The country from Passamaquoddy Bay to the Penobscot River speedily passed under British rule, and remained so until the close of the war. After capturing East
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Saco Bay, settlement of (search)
ng the sick in their cabins, but were never touched by the pestilential fever. He made the whole coast a more hospitable place for Englishmen afterwards. He restrained traders from debauching the Indians with rum, and he was the first Englishman who described the White Mountains, for he went to the source of the Saco River in a canoe. In 1630 the Plymouth Company gave Richard Vines and John Oldham each a tract of land on the Saco River, 4 miles wide on the sea, and extending 8 miles inland.ng the sick in their cabins, but were never touched by the pestilential fever. He made the whole coast a more hospitable place for Englishmen afterwards. He restrained traders from debauching the Indians with rum, and he was the first Englishman who described the White Mountains, for he went to the source of the Saco River in a canoe. In 1630 the Plymouth Company gave Richard Vines and John Oldham each a tract of land on the Saco River, 4 miles wide on the sea, and extending 8 miles inland.
and appoints him governor of the country, which is called Acadia......Nov. 8, 1603 De Monts, accompanied by M. de Poutrincourt, and Samuel Champlain, visits his patent, and discovers Passamaquoddy Bay and the Schoodic or St. Croix River......May, 1604 Later in the season De Monts erects a fort on St. Croix Island, and spends the winter there......1604 De Monts enters Penobscot Bay, erects a cross at Kennebec, and takes possession in the name of the King. He also visits Casco Bay, Saco River, and Cape Cod......May, 1605 George Weymouth, sent out by the Earl of Southampton, anchors at Monhegan Island, May 17, 1605; St. George's Island, May 19, and Penobscot Bay, June 12. After pleasant intercourse with natives, he seizes and carries away five of them......1605 Colonies of Virginia and Plymouth incorporated with a grant of land between 34° and 45°, including all islands within 100 miles of the coast, the permission given the Plymouth colony to begin a plantation anywhere
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
re, he passed six months in the family of Rev. William Parsons Lunt, D. D., and there secured the regard of that intelligent and cultivated gentleman, with whose family Revere became connected after Dr. Lunt's death. He left college without any taste for professional life; and in view of the necessity of following a calling, he decided on mercantile pursuits. In the summer of 1853 he went to Moosehead Lake on a hunting expedition, and travelled with an Indian guide to the source of the Saco River. He went several times to the Adirondacks, for his strong taste for active life was mingled with great love of nature and the spirit of adventure. In 1854, at the wish of his father, he went to Lake Superior to inform himself in regard to the copper region. He had passed a month in pursuing this object, when all his mental and physical powers were taxed by an accident of no ordinary peril. He had crossed Lake Superior with two gentlemen interested in mines; and on their return, upon
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Poems of Nature (search)
with them all. A fern beside the way we went She plucked, and, smiling, held it up, While from her hand the wild, sweet scent I drank as from a cup. O potent witchery of smell! The dust-dry leaves to life return, And she who plucked them owns the spell And lifts her ghostly fern. Or sense or spirit? Who shall say What touch the chord of memory thrills? It passed, and left the August day Ablaze on lonely hills. 1884. The wood giant. from Alton Bay to Sandwich Dome, From Mad to Saco river, For patriarchs of the primal wood We sought with vain endeavor. And then we said: “The giants old Are lost beyond retrieval; This pygmy growth the axe has spared Is not the wood primeval. Look where we will o'er vale and hill, How idle are our searches For broad-girthed maples, wide-limbed oaks, Centennial pines and birches! Their tortured limbs the axe and saw Have changed to beams and trestles; They rest in walls, they float on seas, They rot in sunken vessels. This shorn and wasted
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
ck Point, October 12th of that year; and cut off, at the same time, a party of Englishmen near Saco River. From a deed signed by this Indian in 1664, and from other circumstances, it seems that, prevrsed in Indian wile, For vengeance left his vine-hung isle? Wood Island, near the mouth of the Saco. It was visited by the Sieur de Monts and Champlain, in 1603. The following extract, from the jounded by wild and romantic scenery, is a beautiful waterfall, of more than sixty feet. to the Saco river,— And the fair-haired girl, thou hast sought of me, Shall sit in the Sachem's wigwam, and be Tck Point, October 12th of that year; and cut off, at the same time, a party of Englishmen near Saco River. From a deed signed by this Indian in 1664, and from other circumstances, it seems that, prevhole number of the unconscious sleepers. Note 12, page 358. Wood Island, near the mouth of the Saco. It was visited by the Sieur de Monts and Champlain, in 1603. The following extract, from the j
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Margaret Smith's Journal (search)
heart, with one of old: O Lord! how manifold are thy works: in wisdom hast thou made them all, and the earth is full of thy riches. October 6. Walked out to the iron mines, a great hole digged in the rocks, many years ago, for the finding of iron. Aunt, who was then just settled in housekeeping, told me many wonderful stories of the man who caused it to be digged, a famous doctor of physic, and, as it seems, a great wizard also. He bought a patent of land on the south side of the Saco River, four miles by the sea, and eight miles up into the main-land of Mr. Vines, the first owner thereof; and being curious in the seeking and working of metals, did promise himself great riches in this new country; but his labors came to nothing, although it was said that Satan helped him, in the shape of a little blackamoor manser-vant, who was his constant familiar. My aunt says she did often see him, wandering about among the hills and woods, and along the banks of streams of water, search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Historical papers (search)
deserted, and was obliged to continue his journey. Towards night signs of civilization began to appear,—the heavy, continuous roar of water was heard; and, presently emerging from the forest, he saw a great river dashing in white foam down precipitous rocks, and on its bank the gray walls of a huge stone building, with flankers, palisades, and moat, over which the British flag was flying. This was the famous Saco Fort, built by Governor Phips two years before, just below the falls of the Saco River. The soldiers of the garrison gave the poor fellows a kindly welcome. Joseph, who was scarcely alive, lay for a long time sick in the fort; but Isaac soon regained his strength, and set out for his home in Haverhill, which he had the good fortune to arrive at in safety. Amidst the stirring excitements of the present day, when every thrill of the electric wire conveys a new subject for thought or action to a generation as eager as the ancient Athenians for some new thing, simple legen
753—dau. of Mrs. Francis—m. Joseph Tufts, Jr., of Medford, 21 Mar. 1754; Samuel. Emmon, man-servant of the Wid. Ann, aet. 27, bap. here, 25 July, 1742. See Wyman, 263, 264. 6. Ammi Ruhamah, brother of John (3), grad. Harv. Coll. 1725, and as Sir Cutter was adm. Camb. ch. 26 Nov. 1727, was ordained minister of North Yarmouth (now Yarmouth, Me.), 18 Nov. 1730, and dismissed 28 Nov. or 12 Dec. 1735. Was afterward a physician and superintendent of a trading-house for the Indians on the Saco River, and in 1745 was capt. 7th co. 3d Mass. Regt. expedition against Louisburg, where it appears, after Louisburg was taken by the English, he was detailed to remain in the vicinity in command and to officiate as surgeon, and where in March, 1746, he died of disease, probably fever, a. 40 to 45. Tradition says that his preaching was ingenious and original, and that in surgery he was eminent. His person was spoken of as commanding, his eye black and piercing almost to the annihilation of the
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