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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Sand Landing (Alabama, United States) or search for Sand Landing (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 69: transferred to New York city (search)
ak out. The next mail brought me news that Geronimo was leading in a raid against the people of Arizona southward. The campaign of General Miles ensued; the Indians after capture or surrender were taken first to Florida and afterwards to Mount Vernon, Ala. With them went a small portion of the Aravipa Apaches under Eskiminzin. There seems to have been no reason whatever for taking Eskiminzin and his people, as they were not engaged in the raid. At one time I had word from the Apaches beggor disturbance beyond the control of the States and cities within that domain. In peace, contingencies must be meditated upon, and the army commander be always ready for prompt action. During 1889, when making my inspections, I visited Mount Vernon, Ala., and met the Indians, with Geronimo and Eskiminzin. It is impossible to describe the meeting. The men ran to me and embraced me with what I call the double embrace, and the women brought their children for me to put my hands on them and b