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ent disturbance in New-York have heard the indignation expressed by our soldiers when they first read of the riot in New-York, from newspapers scattered along the column to-day, and the wish that they could be led against that mob, they would never dare look a soldier in the face again. On the twenty-fifth of June, after the battles of Aldie, Middleburgh, and Upperville, the cavalry moved forward to Leesburgh, thence across the Potomac at Edwards's Ferry to Poolesville, passing through Seneca Mills, Middlebrook, Doub's Station, Jefferson, to Frederick City. At this point the force was divided, and went in different directions. As General Kilpatrick was placed in command of the largest division, and being a man of fertile genius, whose heart is in the cause in which he is engaged — and withal one of the most dashing cavalry officers in the United States or any other service, the writer concluded that his duty to the paper he represented required him to proceed with a command which
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
us, however, and at four o'clock telegraphed to General Banks for a brigade of his division, to place on the Maryland shore, in support of the troops on Harrison's Island and the severely pressed combatants on Ball's Bluff. Stone had kept McClellan advised of the progress of affairs at Ball's Bluff during the afternoon, and the latter commander, toward evening, ordered General Banks to send one brigade to the support of the troops on Harrison's Island, and to move with the other two to Seneca Mills, ready to support General Stone, at Edwards's Ferry.--See McClellan's Report, page 84. A little while afterward, the sad news of Baker's death was received, and Stone hastened forward to take command in person. On his way he was met by some of the fugitives, with the tale that the Confederates were ten thousand strong, and that all was lost. Still ignorant of the position of McCall, he left orders to hold Harrison's Island, and then hastened back to Edwards's Ferry, to secure the sa
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 114. fight at Goose Creek, Virginia, October 22, 1861. (search)
ce of a party of cavalry under Major Mix--all of which was done, the party at the same time driving in the enemy's pickets. Orders were received by me to have the Second New York and First Minnesota regiments of infantry at Edwards' Ferry, on Monday, the 21st inst., at daylight, or as near that hour as possible. These two regiments arrived there at the time specified. I also ordered the Thirty-fourth New York Volunteers to proceed to the same point at as early an hour as possible, from Seneca Mills, eight miles distant. They arrived with great promptness at 11 o'clock A. M. During that day and night (the 21st) the entire brigade crossed the river, numbering about two thousand two hundred and fifty men. Just about the time I got the first regiment across, a severe battle commenced near Conrad's Ferry, distant five or six miles. Before the brigade got over, news of a repulse of our troops at Conrad's Ferry reached the General commanding, who sent me an order in writing to commence int
force in front of our positions on the other side of the Potomac, in order to engage our attention there and induce us to leave a large portion of our force for the defence of those positions. He will probably also make demonstrations in the vicinity of Acquia Creek, Mathias Point, and the Occoquan, in order still further to induce us to disseminate our forces. His main and real movement will doubtless be to cross the Potomac between Washington and Point of Rocks, probably not far from Seneca Mills, and most likely at more points than one. His hope will be so to engage our attention by the diversions already named as to enable him to move with a large force direct and unopposed on Baltimore. I see no reason to doubt the possibility of his attempting this with a column of at least 100,000 effective troops. If he has only 130,000 under arms, he can make all the diversions I have mentioned with his raw and badly organized troops, leaving 100,000 effective men for his real movement.
.-Gen. Although not fully informed of the state of affairs, I had, during the afternoon, as a precautionary measure, ordered Gen. Banks to send one brigade to the support of the troops at Harrison's island and to move with the other two to Seneca Mills, ready to support Gen. Stone, if necessary. The 9.30 P. M. despatch of Gen. Stone did not give me entire understanding of the state of the case. Aware of the difficulties and perhaps fatal consequences of attempting to recross such a river support Hamilton brings. I cover the shore opposite this with guns, and am disposing others to help the defence of Harrison's, I think the men will fight well. Entrenchments ordered this morning. C. P. Stone, Brig.-Gen. headquarters, Seneca Mills, Oct. 21, 11 P. M. To Gen. McClellan: Arrived here at nine and a half o'clock. Gen. Stone telegraphs for whole division immediately. Col. Baker is killed, and some trouble exists on his right. We go at once. N. P. Banks, Maj.-Gen. Comman
s Washington, 173, 200 ; changed feelings, 174 ; congratulations, 583. Sebago, 293, 294, 296. Secession, consequences of, 31. Sedgwick, Gen. J., 81, 140, 192. In Peninsula, 261 ; Yorktown, 300, 302-304; Williamsburg, 320, 327, 332 333; West Point (Va.), 336, 337,339; in pursuit, 352; Fair Oaks, 379, 381, 382 ; Savage's Station, 426-428 ; Glendale, 432 ; Malvern, 434, 492. At South Mountain, 582; Antietam, 592, 593, 595, 600, 606, 613. Senate congratulates McClellan, 82. Seneca Mills, Md., 106. Seven Pines, Va.-see Fair Oaks. Seward, Sec., method of recruiting, 143 ; visits McClellan, 549. Seymour, Gen. T., at Gaines's Mill, 414-416 ; Glendale, 430 ; South Mountain, 580. Seymour, Capt. (navy), 306. Sharpsburg, Md., 556, 562, 564, 573, 584, 586, 587,590, 608,609, 620. Shenandoah Valley, Va., 47, 54, 58, 113, 239, 240, 509, 643. Sherman, Gen. T. W., 204, 211, 234. Sherman, Gen. W. T., at Washington, 1861, 68, 80, 89, 138; in West, 201, 202. Shields, G
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Michigan Volunteers. (search)
7, 1865. Old members mus- Companies I and M served detached from Regiment February, 1863, to May, 1864. Attached to Jewett's Corps of Observation February to June, 1863. Guard and patrol duty along the Potomac to prevent blockade running across that river to Baltimore, Md. Stationed at and operating about Rockville, Great Falls, Edward's Ferry, Poolesville and White's Ford, Md., till June, 1863. Skirmish at Oakland, Md., April 26 (Co. I ). Skirmish with Moseby at Seneca Mills, Md., June 10. Gettysburg (Pa.) Campaign June-July. Forced march during night of July 3 from Fredericksburg, Va., and action with Lee's Bridge Guard at Falling Waters July 4. Detachment of 140 men surprised and dispersed a much larger force guarding Lee's Pontoon Bridge swinging on the Virginia side of the Potomac, capturing men and ammunition and completely destroying the pontoons and trains which General Lee admitted delayed his army seven days. Occupation of Harper's Ferry Ju
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Minnesota Volunteers. (search)
east Virginia, to August, 1861. Stone's Brigade, Division of the Potomac, to October, 1861. Gorman's Brigade, Stone's (Sedgwick's) Division, Army of the Potomac, to March, 1862. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to February, 1864, Dept. of the Northwest to May; 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 2nd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July, 1865. Service. Advance on Manassas, Va., July 16-21, 1861. Battle of Bull Run July 21. Moved to Seneca Mills, Md., August 2-7, thence to near Edward's Ferry, August 16, and duty guarding Upper Potomac till February, 1862. Operations about Ball's Bluff October 11-23. Battle of Ball's Bluff October 21. Leesburg Road October 21 (2 Cos.). Goose Creek and near Edward's Ferry October 22. Advance toward Winchester, Va., February 25-March 15. At Bolivar Heights till March 22. Moved to Washington and Alexandria, thence to Hampton, Va., March 22-April 1. Siege of Yorktown April 5-May
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers who died of wounds. (search)
a., May 4, 1864.Fort Monroe, Va., July 23, 1864. Draper, William D., Corp.,2d Mass. Inf.,Chancel lorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.Nov. 3, 1863. Drew, Stephen,58th Mass. Inf.,– –York, Pa., Sept. 2, 1864. Driscoll, Dennis, Corp.,37th Mass. Inf.,Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.Washington, D. C., May 29, 1863. Dudley, Joseph,34th Mass. Inf.,March 31, 1865,Point of Rocks, Md., Sept. 4, 1864. Dunbar, Allen B.,33d Mass. Inf.,– –Chattanooga, Tenn., June 28, 1864. Dnnbar, John B.,2d Mass. Inf.,Seneca Mills, Md., 1862,March, 1862. Dunbar, William,35th Mass. Inf.,Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 19, 1864.Slough Barracks, Alexandria, Va., Oct. 12, 1864. Dunham, George, Sergt.,11th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 2, 1864. Dunham, Hallowell R.,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Hoffman Hosp., Md., Oct. 2, 1862. Dunn, Charles J.,21st Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864.Before Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864. Dunn, John,21st Mass. Inf.,Camden, N. C., April 19, 1862.North Carolina, May 1, 1862. Dunton, Prince A.,13
a., May 4, 1864.Fort Monroe, Va., July 23, 1864. Draper, William D., Corp.,2d Mass. Inf.,Chancel lorsville, Va., May 3, 1863.Nov. 3, 1863. Drew, Stephen,58th Mass. Inf.,– –York, Pa., Sept. 2, 1864. Driscoll, Dennis, Corp.,37th Mass. Inf.,Salem Heights, Va., May 3, 1863.Washington, D. C., May 29, 1863. Dudley, Joseph,34th Mass. Inf.,March 31, 1865,Point of Rocks, Md., Sept. 4, 1864. Dunbar, Allen B.,33d Mass. Inf.,– –Chattanooga, Tenn., June 28, 1864. Dnnbar, John B.,2d Mass. Inf.,Seneca Mills, Md., 1862,March, 1862. Dunbar, William,35th Mass. Inf.,Weldon Railroad, Va., Aug. 19, 1864.Slough Barracks, Alexandria, Va., Oct. 12, 1864. Dunham, George, Sergt.,11th Mass. Inf.,– –Oct. 2, 1864. Dunham, Hallowell R.,19th Mass. Inf.,– –Hoffman Hosp., Md., Oct. 2, 1862. Dunn, Charles J.,21st Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864.Before Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864. Dunn, John,21st Mass. Inf.,Camden, N. C., April 19, 1862.North Carolina, May 1, 1862. Dunton, Prince A.,13
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