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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
aboard and Roanoke Railroad 93, 1; 117, 1; 138, B8 Searcy, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 154, A5; 171 Secessionville, S. C.: Engagement, June 16, 1862 23, 6, 23, 7 Sedalia, Mo. 47, 1; 135-A; 152, D2; 161, E13; 171 Selecman's, Va. 8, 1 Selma, Ala. 70, 4; 76, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 148, E5; 171 Capture, April 2, 1865 70, 4 Senatobia, Miss. 154, C10 Seneca, Md. 27, 1; 100, 1; 136, F7 Seneca Creek, Md. 7, 1; 27, 1; 81, 4; 100, 1 Sequatchie Valley, Tenn. 35, 5 Seven Days battles, Va., June 25-July 1, 1862: Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862 42, 3; 63, 8 Glendale, June 30, 1862 21, 8 Malvern Hill, July 1, 1862 21, 10 Mechanicsville, June 26, 1862 21, 7; 63, 8; 90, 9 Stuart's cavalry operations, June 25-July 10, 1862 22, 1 Theater of operations 20, 1 Seven Pines, Va. 17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 74, 1; 77, 1; 92, 1; 100, 1, 100, 2; 135, 3; 137, F8 Sevierville, Tenn. 24, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 142,
by General Maxey. (1143) Report of Col. J. R. Howard of skirmishes near Mountain gap, October 14 to 16, 1862. Vol. XVI, Part 2—(242) General McCook writes to General Buell that Howard's regiment is on road to Nashville, August 1, 1862. (267) Howard has returned to Chattanooga, August 6th. (716) In Kirby Smith's forces, unattached. (743) Ordered to report to General Forrest, August 4th. (761) Ordered to remain near Chattanooga, August 17th, with General Maxey. (800) Ordered into Sequatchie valley, September 7th. (840) Gen. Sam Jones says he will send it, with Maxey's command, into Kentucky. (985) In Pegram's brigade, Heth's division, Gen. E. Kirby Smith's troops, October 31st. Vol. XVII, Part 2—(835) Field return, with Wharton's brigade, 457 effective, December 30, 1862. Vol. Xx—(14) Report of Colonel Howard of skirmish near Tompkinsville, Ky., November 17, 1862; 4 killed, 3 wounded. (75) Mentioned in General Wharton's report, December 10th. (233)
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ion was accordingly ordered, but on the appeal of its commander, stating his resources and ability for defence, favorably endorsed by Major-General Buckner, the orders were suspended on the 31st August. The main body of our army was encamped near Chattanooga, whilst the cavalry force, much reduced and enfeebled by long service on short rations, was recruiting in the vicinity of Rome, Georgia. Immediately after crossing the mountains to the Tennessee, the enemy threw a corps by way of Sequatchie Valley to strike the rear of General Buckner's command, whilst Burnside occupied him in front. One division already ordered to his assistance, proving insufficient to meet the force concentrating on him, Buckner was directed to withdraw to the Hiawassee, with his infantry, artillery and supplies, and to hold his cavalry in front to check the enemy's advance. As soon as this change was made, the corps threatening his rear was withdrawn, and the enemy commenced a movement in force against our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ion was accordingly ordered, but on the appeal of its commander, stating his resources and ability for defence, favorably endorsed by Major-General Buckner, the orders were suspended on the 31st August. The main body of our army was encamped near Chattanooga, whilst the cavalry force, much reduced and enfeebled by long service on short rations, was recruiting in the vicinity of Rome, Georgia. Immediately after crossing the mountains to the Tennessee, the enemy threw a corps by way of Sequatchie Valley to strike the rear of General Buckner's command, whilst Burnside occupied him in front. One division already ordered to his assistance, proving insufficient to meet the force concentrating on him, Buckner was directed to withdraw to the Hiawassee, with his infantry, artillery and supplies, and to hold his cavalry in front to check the enemy's advance. As soon as this change was made, the corps threatening his rear was withdrawn, and the enemy commenced a movement in force against our
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
al army, on the other hand, was magnificently equipped. Each had just recovered from the conflict at Shiloh, in which at the close of the first day the Federal forces were heavily re-enforced by Buell's army, and the latter were flushed with a victory, if one it might be called. After a short stay at Tupelo, a short period of drilling and discipline at Chattanooga, in the latter part of August, 1862, the Southern army started on the campaign into Kentucky— Bragg, with 20,000, passing Sequatchie valley, Sparta, Greensboro, thence into Kentucky, by way of Munfordville to the scene of severe conflict, of which we are about to speak, and Kirby Smith, with some 15,000, going from Knoxville across the Cumberland Mountains, near Cumberland Gap, thence to Richmond, Ky., on his way to Frankfort. Buell concentrated his forces in middle Tennessee, pursuing thence a parallel course through Murfreesboro, Nashville and thence to Louisville. It is said that Buell had under his command at and
247. Selma, , C. S. S., VI., 252, 254 seq. Seminary Hospital, Georgetown, D. C. , VII., 283. Seminary Ridge, Gettysburg, Pa. , 243, 260. Seminole,, U. S. S., VI., 48. Seminole Indians Iv., 22. Semmes, P. J., X., 153. Semmes, R.: V., 158; VI., 80, 287, 289, 290, 293, 294, 301, 302, 304, 320; IX., 340 seq., 346. Semmes' Battery, Confederate, II., 320. Seneca,, U. S. S., III., 342; VI., 312. Separation and reunion, IX., 44 seq. Sequatchie Valley, Tenn., IV., 214. Sergeant and sentry guard, Long Bridge, Va., VIII, 81. Seven Days Battles: I., 83, 132, 299, 312 seq., 315, 320, 337; military result of, I., 338, 340, 342, 366; IV., 238; V., 33, 66; VII., 233; VIII., 346, 382; IX., 75, 79, 144; fighting around Richmond, X., 64, 142; losses at, X., 142, 156. Seven Pines, Va. (see also Fair Oaks, Va.): I., 122, 282, 288, 291, 292, 364; V., 304, 314; VII., 102; battle of, IX., 59. Seventh Street Road, D. C., V.,
f affairs in East Tennessee, which we copy, inasmuch as, in the whirl of stirring events near home, the more distant fields of operation have to some extent been lost sight of: It is now quite evident that the enemy are about to put into execution their long threatened inroad upon East Tennessee. From the best information we can gather of the situation of affairs in that section, we take it that fighting will soon commence there in earnest. The Yankees already have possession of Sequatchie Valley, a productive and stock growing country, and have a force of perhaps not less than 5,000 men in Powell's Valley, a portion of country still more important to an army in the way of provisions. But the great valleys of the Tennessee, Hiwassee, Holston, and French Broad rivers, are still in possession of our troops, and can we have reason to hope, be held against almost any force that may assail them. We think it altogether probable that Cumberland, Wheeler's, and Big Creek Caps, will b
Atlanta, July 2. --The Yankees are making a said in East Tennessee. A strong force was at Sequatchie Valley yesterday. To-day there has been no communication with Knoxville or London Bridge. It is believed that important movements of Bragg's and Rosecrans's armies are in progress. No particulars received. [Second Dispatch.] Atlanta, July 2 --We have reports — deemed reliable — that Rosecrans attempted to flank Bragg's right, and, it is said, was also moving on Chattanooga, but turned back on learning that the force at Chattanooga was ready for them. Gen. Bragg's left was understood to be at Tullahoma and his right at Docherd in strong position and perfectly confident. No further particulars from East Tennessee
f Rosecrans and Burnside are concentrated, and half a dozen of our Confederate armies, more or less are combined against them, the heaviest battle of the war may be anticipated somewhere between Bridgeport and Knoxville. Much greater confidence is now felt in our ability to meet the invasion. It is reported that in Col. Dibrell's late fight at Sparta with the enemy the notorious cavalry General Minly was killed. Rosecrans stopped over-night at the residence of Mr. Rankin, in Sequatchie Valley, on last Thursday night. Parties from Lookout Peak report that some twenty or thirty heavy brass siege pieces have been planted by the enemy in the bend entitling the city. They can be seen, it is said with a good marine glass. The Yankee loss was upwards of fifty during the cannonade off Friday. Persons out from Nashville say that the Unionists there think of nothing, talk of nothing, and hope for nothing, but the possession of East Tennessee. A gentleman who came
The Daily Dispatch: October 28, 1863., [Electronic resource], Horriels Cruelty of "the traitor Letcher." (search)
Operations in Sequatchie Valley. Atlanta, Oct. 26. --Our cavalry continue active operations in the Sequatchie Valley to the great annoyance of the enemy. On Friday they captured the notorious Col. Cliff, of Tennessee, with his escort and mails — the latter containing orders to Burnside.
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