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th brush. The run crosses the railroad at right angles under a high bridge, at the eastern end of which a dilapidated windmill stands, formerly used for pumping water for the use of the road. About three fourths of a mile west of Bristoe is Cedar Run, a small stream; but, from its depth of mud and water, difficult to ford. On the north side of the track, about thirty rods west of the bridge, is a solitary house, or rather shanty, which, though insignificant of itself, figures somewhat extee; the other fork crossing the track about twenty rods west of the bridge, and leading to the fork on the south side of the bridge. The road on the south side of the track runs parallel with the railroad; but a branch makes off to the right at Cedar Run, and crosses Broad Run about thirty rods south of the bridge. East of Broad Run, about a hundred rods distant, is a belt of timber perhaps a quarter of a mile wide, east of which the country on the south side of the track is open to Manassas.
e infantry to come back to check our advance. Accordingly Ewell recrossed the river during the forenoon, and took up his line of march toward the Orange and Alexandria railroad, where they had a series of works, leaving only Stuart to demonstrate upon our right, north of the river. This, then, was the position of the forces on Saturday night at dark, with every prospect of a bloody fight on the coming day. Buford was at Germania, the First and Sixth corps extending from Raccoon Ford to Cedar Run; Kilpatrick, supported by the Second and Third corps, to the west of Culpeper, from three to four miles distant. Ewell had moved back from his position in the morning, and faced Newton and Sedgwick, while Stuart fronted French, Warren, and Kilpatrick in the vicinity of Bethel Church. On Sunday morning at two o'clock our infantry force, both at the Rapidan and west of town, commenced moving toward the Rappahannock, their trains having all been sent back the night before, leaving the enti
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
in order to keep McClellan stationary, or, if possible, to cause him to withdraw, General D. H. Hill, commanding south of James River, was directed to threaten his communications. And in his report, dated June 8th, 1863: The victory at Cedar Run [August 9th] effectually checked the progress of the enemy for the time, but it soon became apparent that his army was being largely increased. The corps of Major-General Burnside from North Carolina, which had reached Fredericksburg [August 4he entire command under Jackson on the field, numbering at least 20,000. The Confederates opened the battle, sending forward Early and Taliaferro at 3 o'clock, but moving with caution. [See p. 496.] Banks's line was formed in the valley of Cedar Run, and overlapped the Confederate left. Geary and Prince, advancing, encountered Early and Taliaferro on the broad cultivated plateau south of the Culpeper road, while Crawford closed in from the north on the enemy's left. The advantage was wit
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
y to his communications, he drew his army still closer to the latter place, where he had his Headquarters, and on the morning of the 9th he sent Banks forward to Cedar Run with his whole corps, consisting of about eight thousand men, to join Crawford Crawford's brigade was composed of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Tenth Maine, Fifth Connecticut, and Twenty-eighth New York, with Best's battery of Regulars. near Cedar or Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles southward, take command of all the forces there, attack the enemy as soon as he should appear, and rely upon re-enforcements from Headquarters. Sigel was ordered to advance from Sperryville at the same tile waiting for an answer, the precious hours that might have taken him to the front and secured a victory were lost. So ended the battle of Cedar Mountain, or of Cedar Run, as the Confederates call it. None was more desperately fought during the war. A part of the sanguinary struggle was hand to hand, under the dark pall of smoke t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
der General Warren, with Kilpatrick's cavalry, was at that time covering the National rear, and when Lee reached Warrenton, this rear-guard was at Auburn, only a few miles eastward, with Caldwell's division and three batteries on the heights of Cedar Run, between them. Stuart had inadvertently got ahead of this covering force, and found himself hemmed in between the two National corps, with small chance to escape. His first impulse was to abandon his guns and all impediments to a speedy flighe the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth New York and Twelfth New Jersey volunteers. In this encounter, Colonel Thomas Ruffin, the leader of Confederate cavalry, which charged furiously, was killed. thrown out by General Hayes from the north side of Cedar Run, and the way was cleared for the advance of the corps. Ewell was held in check until Warren's troops had crossed the Run and resumed their line of march (Caldwell covering the rear, and skirmishing almost continually) for the heights of Centre
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
wn at seven thousand, and his loss at seven hundred and eighteen, that of the Confederate army at five hundred killed and a thousand wounded. After remaining seven days in the positions to which they had marched from Manassas, the troops crossed the Rapidan and encamped between Orange Court-House and the railroad-bridge. Ewell's division, however, was left in its position near the Rappahannock, with Stuart's cavalry, in observation of a Federal division that had followed our march to Cedar Run, where it halted. The line of the Rappahannock had been taken temporarily, in preference to that of the Rapidan, be-. cause it is nearer Bull Run, and covered more of the country; the river being deeper, protected the troops better, and we wished to use the provision then in its rich valley, as well as to deprive the enemy of it. On the 18th it had become evident that the activity reported in Maryland, two weeks before, was connected with no advance of the enemy on the Fredericksburg r
nd McIntosh, to drive in the rebel pickets on the front, and another squadron to accomplish the same on the right. The charge in front was beautifully made, and as the Fifth rode up the hill, the rebels took to their heels and retreated across Cedar Run, destroying the railroad-bridge by fire as they went along. As our cavalry approached the run and were attempting to save the bridge, the rebels secreted in the forest fired two or three volleys upon them. Private John W. Bryand was shot inpt their blankets. At daylight on Saturday morning Gen. Stone-man received information that the rebels were endeavoring to surround him and cut off his retreat, and that they had several regiments of infantry and one or two of cavalry beyond Cedar Run. A close watch was continued, and about half-past 7 o'clock two companies of the Fifty-seventh regiment New--York volunteers, Major Parisen, marched toward the creek near the bridge, where they deployed. The woods on the other side were seemi
rt, the rebels showing their front upon Slaughter's Mountain, a sugarloaf eminence, situated two milationed in position at what is known as Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles distant from Culpeper. Abr Mountain, or, as it is called by many, Slaughter-Mountain. In this direction General Banks moved.so many noble dead and dying been called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford andld we had artillery enough to have blown Slaughter Mountain from its base, but by the superior skills with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. s with the enemy, we learn that the fight at Cedar Run, on Saturday last, was the most desperate anks's corps, in the direction of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain, to support Gen. Bayard, who was fallingeither fall back and meet Heintzelman behind Cedar Run, or cross the Rappahannock with my whole forClary to run the trains back to this side of Cedar Run, and to post a regiment and section of artil[2 more...]
private died, on the march, the regiment reached a wood near Slaughter's Mountain, and some sixteen hundred yards from the enemy's position, wt a mile and more apart, the rebels showing their front upon Slaughter's Mountain, a sugarloaf eminence, situated two miles to the west of the at Mitchell's station. Our front was on much lower ground, with Cedar Run in our rear and a small wooded ridge behind that. Gradually, fame upon the enemy stationed in position at what is known as Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles distant from Culpeper. About eleven A. M. a darom a party near Cedar Mountain, or, as it is called by many, Slaughter-Mountain. In this direction General Banks moved. Four or five miles s the spot where lie so many noble dead and dying been called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying ther and the battle-field we had artillery enough to have blown Slaughter Mountain from its base, but by the superior skill of some one, only fo
Rebel reports and narratives. General Jackson's report. headquarters valley District, August 12--6 1/2 P. M. Colonel: On the evening of the ninth instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. The enemy, according to the statement of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's, and Sigel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less thaag of truce. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, Va., August 15. From an officer of the Stonewall brigade, one who has followed its fortunes in all its desperate and bloody encounters with the enemy, we learn that the fight at Cedar Run, on Saturday last, was the most desperate and determined of any that he has yet witnessed. The enemy's cavalry first advanced upon our column in heavy force, and were suffered to approach within a few yards of our men, when the whole line po
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