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of the enemy and the lower fords of the Rappahannock. Early in the day I pushed forward Crawford's brigade, of Banks's corps, in the direction of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain, to support Gen. Bayard, who was falling back in that direction, and to assist him as far as practicable in determining the movements and the forces of the above, and my rear is entirely exposed if I move toward Sulphur Springs or Warrenton. I must do one of two things: either fall back and meet Heintzelman behind Cedar Run, or cross the Rappahannock with my whole force and assail the enemy's flank and rear. I must do one or the other at daylight. Which shall it be? I incline to up, with instructions to follow you immediately upon his doing so. If Banks is not at the Junction, instruct Col. Clary to run the trains back to this side of Cedar Run, and to post a regiment and section of artillery with it. By command of General Pope. Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smit
on the ninth, Jackson's command arrived within eight miles of Culpeper Court-House, when the enemy was found near Cedar Run, a short distance north-west of Slaughter's Mountain. Early's brigade, of Ewell's division, was thrown forward on the road to Culpeper Court-House. The remaining two brigades, those of Trimble and Hays, the latter under Colonel Forno, diverging to the right, took position on the western slope of Slaughter's Mountain. Jackson's own division, under Brigadier-General Wilder, was placed on the left of the road — Campbell's brigade, Lieutenant-Colonel Garnett commanding, being on the left; Taliaferro's parallel to the road, supporting tigorous execution of the entire enterprise. Campaign in Northern Virginia, from the battle of Cedar Run to the battle of Ox Hill, inclusive. The victory at Cedar Run effectually checked the progress of the enemy for the time; but it soon became apparent that his army was being largely increased. The corps of Major-General Bu
as follows, the movements of my division at Cedar Run, on the ninth August, 1862: My division fuit, and next morning I was remanded to Slaughter's Mountain. An armistice having been agreed on tohe ninth instant, during the engagement near Cedar Run: On the morning of the ninth, the First, cavalry drawn up on the range of hills near Cedar Run, with a line of videttes in front, whilst th, during the battle of the ninth instant, at Cedar Run. Although not actively engaged, the brigadee woods on our right along the slope of Slaughter's Mountain, and occupy a favorable position. Abouirst Virginia regiment in the battle of Slaughter's Mountain, on the ninth instant, which, I fear, w to camp, we first learned that the batte of Cedar Run had been progressing the greater part of the a part, was marched through the woods, near Cedar Run, in Culpeper, in column of regiments, withinmmand in the battle of the ninth instant, at Cedar Run: About five o'clock P. M., by order of Ma[13 more...]
not yet arrived, being detained by the artillery. The streams — Cedar Run and Rappahannock — were in my rear, and the former was reported another series of fights, commencing at Richmond and going through Cedar Run, Manassas, Harper's Ferry, and Sharpsburg, entering the last wearof the part taken by this brigade in the various engagements from Cedar Run to Shepherdstown, inclusive. The report must necessarily be impert taken in the various battles by their respective commands. Cedar Run, August 9TH. After a long, rapid, and weary march, we reached the battle-field at Cedar Run on the afternoon of the ninth August, and took the position assigned us in line of battle by General Branch, inluntarily surrendered themselves. After advancing in line beyond Cedar Run, we were half-wheeled to the right and marched across the road, t I understand that the call does not include the Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain campaign, which this brigade, as part of your division, made
and referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. On the twenty-fifth, Mr. Deming, of Connecticut, reported it back with an amendment in the nature of a substitute. The substitute declared: That the thanks of Congress be tendered to Major-General Philip H. Sheridan and the officers and men under his command, for the gallantry, military skill, and courage displayed in the brilliant series of victories achieved by them in the valley of the Shenandoah, and especially for their services at Cedar Run, on the nineteenth of October, 1864, which retrieved the fortunes of the day and averted a great disaster; and it further requested the President of the United States to communicate the resolution to Major-General Sheridan, and through him to the officers and soldiers under his command. The substitute was agreed to, and the resolution as amended passed — yeas, one hundred and thirty-one; nays, two. In the Senate, on the first day of February, Mr. Wilson, from the Committee on Military Af
the 9th Jackson finally got his troops over the Rapidan and the Robertson rivers. Two miles beyond the latter stream there rose from the plain the slope of Slaughter Mountain, whose ominous name is more often changed into Cedar. This mountain is an isolated foothill of the Blue Ridge, some twenty miles from the parent range, andd, wounded and missing. The battle had accomplished nothing. Battlefield of Cedar Mountain, August 9, 1862. Cedar Mountain: casualty. On the banks of Cedar Run, seven miles south of Culpeper and but one or two north of the mountain, Banks's cavalry were waiting to oppose Jackson's advance. Learning of this the latter t for the timely aid of another brigade and still another that rushed down the hill and opened fire on the Federal lines which extended along the eastern bank of Cedar Run. Meanwhile the Union batteries had been wheeled into position and their deep roar answered that of the foe on the hill. For two or three hours the battle con
in Maryland, and who caused Lincoln to recall the schoolboy game: Three times round and out. Repairing Confederate damage: Federal engineers at work October 14, 1863. The busy Federal engineers are rebuilding the railroad bridge across Cedar Run, near Catlett's Station, destroyed by the Confederates on the previous day, October 13th, when they fell back before the Army of the Potomac under General Meade. The fall of 1863 was a period of small cavalry battles. On September 16th the ArFord, where he recrossed the Rapidan and engaged a body of the enemy. At daylight on October 14th, the Confederates attacked Gregg's Second Cavalry Division, but he held his position tenaciously while General Warren got the Second Corps across Cedar Run. It seldom took over a few hours to rebuild one of these bridges. Sometimes the troops tore down the nearest wooden houses to get boards and timber. This wrecking of houses was very arduous work. The trees in the foreground have been sacrif
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
at Sharpsburg, but General A. P. Hill peremptorily ordered me to do so — from Cedar Run to Shepherdstown, both inclusive — remarking that he hadn't the time to be rearated from the main body of Branch's brigade. My report of the brigade at Cedar Run gave, I am sorry to say, great dissatisfaction to a few of the officers of thwing report of the part taken by this brigade in the various engagements from Cedar Run to Shepherdstown, inclusive. The report must necessarily be imperfect, as I nt of the part taken in the various battles by their respective commands. Cedar Run--August 9. After a long, rapid and weary march, we reached the battlefield at Cedar Run on the afternoon of the 9th of August, and took the position assigned us in line of battle by General Branch in the woods to the left of the road leadiolors and voluntarily surrendered themselves. After advancing in line beyond Cedar run, we were half-wheeled to the right and marched across the road, through a fie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) By Colonel Wm. Allan, late Chief of Ordnany prepared account of Pope's campaign (after Cedar Run) that I have met with. It is vivid, and, wiof his command whose strength is reported at Cedar Run is Archer's brigade, which was 1,200 strong regiments. The strength of nine of these at Cedar Run is given in the Confederate official reports Colonel Taylor puts at 8,000 men. But at Cedar Run Jackson had in addition six regiments, constt the strength of Pope's army at the time of Cedar Run, August 9. General Pope reports officiallPope says that Banks had only about 8,000 at Cedar Run, meaning infantry and artillery, as the abovrps from heat and diarrhea on their march to Cedar Run, and recalls the fact that one regiment,. Sie War, in which he estimates his strength at Cedar Run at 6,000, and again on the the next page at ,000 men. Of this force there was present at Cedar Run-- Banks' corps8,000 Bayard's cavalry1,20
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative strength at Second Manassas. (search)
McDonough school, Md., March 27, 1880. Rev. Dr. Jones: My Dear Sir — In my letter of March 2d, in regard to Federal and Confederate strength and losses at Cedar Run, as published, there is a typographical error on page 183, line twenty from the top. The figures 1,161 at the beginning of that line should be 1,661. Confederate strength. Deducting Jackson's loss of 1,314 at Cedar Run from his total strength of 23,823 we have left for his force of all arms at the beginning of the second Manassas campaign about 22,500. What forces did General Lee add to this from Richmond? Colonel Walter Taylor (Four Years with General Lee, page 60) says: General of Cedar Run, even after deducting nearly 3,000, which he claims as an error in Banks' report, but which the latter has never admitted. Deducting the losses at Cedar Run, Pope must have had nearly 43,000 men in his three corps. Reno joined him with 8,000 men on August 14th. He had thus, on August 18, the day he began to withdra
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