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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
vision and dislodge them. Advancing under a heavy fire of artillery, the three brigades of Gregg, Pender and Archer attacked the enemy vigorously and drove them over the river with heavy loss. * * * * * R. E. Lee, General. Casualties from Cedar Run to Shepherdstown.  7th Regiment.18th Regiment.28th Regiment.33d Regiment.37th Regiment.Total. Killed.Wounded.Missing.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Killed.Wounded.Missing.Killed.Wounded.Missing. Cedar RuCedar Run 2 115 328 630 213 1288  Shelling on Rappahannock       3        3  Manassas Junction                   Manassas Plains761 212 737118 1367 301851 Ox Hill41612161226 116 518 14922 Harper's Ferry 4              4  Sharpsburg9434814  2 316  4 20794 Shepherdstown 15 226 116  10  4 371  Aggregate201415158311311211180 20106 793527 On our march to Manassas Junction we had nothing to eat, and were turned into field
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
After this battle our brigade was ordered to Moss neck, below Fredericksburg, and went into winter quarters in the woods around the residence of a Mr. Corbin. List of casualties in Lane's brigade, in campaign of 1862. names of Battles.Killed: Offic'rs and Men.Wounded: Offic'rs and Men.Missing: Offic'rs and Men.Aggregate. Hanover Courthouse, May 2773202Unknown.275 Mechanicsville, June 26Killed & Wounded, 85315868 Cold Harbor, June 27 Frazier's Farm, June 30 Maivern Hill, July 1 Cedar Run, August 91288 100 Warrenton Springs, August 24 3 3 Manassas Junction, August 26   <*> Manassas Plains, August 28, 29, 3030185Unknown.215 Ox Hill, September 114922108 Harper's Ferry, September 15 4 4 Sharpsburg, September 1721794104 Shepherdstown, September 20371 74 Fredericksburg, December 1362257216535 Grand Total   2,286 remarks.--This list was made from published official reports. The reports of Hanover Courthouse and Manassas Plains refer to the missing, but do not
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
. There were immense quantities of stores of every kind captured at both Winchester and Martinsburg, and our fellows revelled in the supplies of every description, which the sutlers had accumulated in Winchester. It was the capture of these immense quantities of medical, ordnance, commisary, and especially quarter-master stores, which originated the soubriquet by which ever afterwards we knew General Banks, as Stonewall Jackson's quarter-master. I remember that at the battle of Slaughter's Mountain when we learned from a prisoner that General Banks was in command of the forces opposed to us, it rang all along our line: Send in your requisitions, boys, for whatever you want in the way of clothing. Stonewall's Quarter-master --General Banks--has come with a full supply to issue. We have a kindly feeling for General Banks. He treated the people of the Valley much more leniently than his successors in command there. He has shown on occasion (not always) that he has some apprecia
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiseences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ts to division and brigade headquarters. I might as well give here several other illustrations that came under my personal observation, of how Jackson concealed his plans from even his higher officers. A short time before the battle of Slaughter's Mountain our division had been lying all day in the turnpike above Gordonsville, when General Ewell rode up to a friend of mine, with whom I was conversing at the time, and asked: Dr.----, can you tell me where we are going? That question,t all. General Jackson simply ordered me to have my division ready to move at early dawn. I have been ready ever since, but have had no further intimation of his plans. And that is about all I ever know of his designs. On the march to Slaughter's Mountain I remember that I lingered at our camp, three miles above Gordonsville, until sundown, in order to ride in the cool of the evening with a brother chaplain and a sick friend (a gallant artillery officer whom we could not persuade to go to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
put his army in motion for the line of the Rapidan. General Longstreet's division, with Stuart's cavalry covered the movement, which, however, was unmolested, the enemy only discovering it after it was under way. General McClellan was at that period collecting the necessary transportation for his movement to the Peninsula, but as this was not yet ready, he improved the opportunity to mobolize his army by marching it as far as Centreville. A cavalry force under Stonemen pushed forward to Cedar Run and exchanged a few carbine shots with Stuart, but did not cross. Owing to lack of transportation upon the railroad, some provisions, stores and baggage had to be burned at Manassas at the last moment, although two days more time had been allowed for their removal than the superintendent of the road had requested. The total value of these stores was, however, not great, and when all things are considered, the movement was as eminently successful as it was judicious. The Washington a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. Was Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain) a Federal victory? We had always thought that the Confederates won that field. It so happened that our Brigade (Early's), and our own Regiment (the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry) opened the battle — that we saw the enemy driven back some two miles--and that General Early having charge of the truce to bury the dead which the enemy asked, and Jackson granted, we witnessed the burying of the poor fellows who had been killed in their vSlaughter's Mountain) a Federal victory? We had always thought that the Confederates won that field. It so happened that our Brigade (Early's), and our own Regiment (the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry) opened the battle — that we saw the enemy driven back some two miles--and that General Early having charge of the truce to bury the dead which the enemy asked, and Jackson granted, we witnessed the burying of the poor fellows who had been killed in their vain efforts to break through the Stonewall, and that we conversed with a number of Federal officers who frankly admitted that the Foot Cavalry had given their old friend Stonewall's Quartermaster a very sound drubbing. But we have seen a newspaper report of a paper read by Rev. F. Denison, Chaplain of the First Rhode Island Cavalry, before the Soldiers and Sailors Historical Society of Rhode Island, in which he makes, concerning this battle, the remarkable statement (if rightly quoted): Thefi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, (search)
ginia, By J. William Jones. Paper no. 9. Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain.) After the seven dSlaughter's Mountain.) After the seven days battles around Richmond we had a brief season of rest, which was greatly enjoyed after the marchqualities as a man. Just before the march to Cedar Run I was called to his Headquarters to give himht miles from Culpeper Courthouse, near Slaughter's Mountain, and not far from Cedar Run. Some timepporting batteries splendidly posted on Slaughter's Mountain; Winder, commanding Jackson's old diviss with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Courthouse. s that Old jack gained a splendid victory at Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain), and learning that thSlaughter's Mountain), and learning that the enemy had received large reinforcements he waited two days for an attack, and then marched leisure of the fight this gentleman rode up on Slaughter's Mountain, where he was spied by rough old Ewell,we got on the different battles, ending with Cedar Run. A Colonel with whom I was talking finally
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ition died of typhoid fever. Captain Francis T. Hawks succeeded Captain Cannady, and continued with the brigade until after the battle of Fredericksburg. In his report of the battle of Newberne, General Branch says: To Mr. Francis T. Hawks, who tendered his services for the occasion and was placed on my staff, I was greatly indebted for services in bearing orders and rallying troops. He remained with me throughout the battle and subsequent retreat. General Branch also reports that at Cedar Run he conducted himself gallantly. After we went into winter-quarters at Moss Neck, Captain George B. Johnston, on my recommendation, was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General of our brigade, but remained with us only a short time on account of ill health. He tendered his resignation July 6th, 1863, and died soon after of consumption. Captain Johnston was a highly cultivated, intelligent, kind-hearted, Christian gentleman, a thorough rebel, and a bold and most efficient officer. He enter
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. (search)
ehind at Richmond for purposes of instruction. It was afterwards called Carrington's Charlottesville Artillery. At Cedar Run fight (Cedar Run Mountain or Slaughter's Mountain) we had Latimer's (Courtney) artillery; the Bedford battery, Captain Slaughter's Mountain) we had Latimer's (Courtney) artillery; the Bedford battery, Captain Johnson (formerly Captain Bowyer); the Louisiana Guard artillery, Captain D'Aquin: the First Maryland artillery, Captain Dement; the Chesapeake (Second Maryland) artillery, Captain Brown, and the Manchester artillery, Lieutenant Pleasants (I think) wn by the names of their commanders, so we now speak of Ewell's division, of Early's, Trimble's and Hays's brigades. At Cedar Run Early was very hotly engaged, being the advance of the whole centre and left of the army. Trimble and Forno on the front of Slaughter's Mountain, were under a heavy fire of artillery but no musketry. The day after the fight Lawton's brigade of the Thirteenth, Twenty-sixth, Thirty-first, Sixtieth and Sixty-first Georgia regiments and the Staunton artillery were adde
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
number equal to their whole force. The conduct of Hays's Louisiana brigade and Hoke's North Carolina brigade, the latter under Colonel Avery, at Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, was worthy of the highest praise. Here and at Winchester the Louisiana brigade and their gallant commander gave new honor to the name already acquired on the old fields of Winchester and Port Republic, and wherever engaged. Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews, of the artillery, not fully recovered from his serious wound at Cedar Run, was again wounded at Winchester, and while suffering from his wounds appeared on the field at Hagerstown and reported for duty. The rapid and skilful advance of Gordon's brigade on the 13th of June near Winchester, with great spirit driving the enemy in confusion towards the town, was one of the finest movements I have witnessed during the war, and won for the troops and their gallant commander the highest commendation. At Winchester the Maryland battalion was attached to General St
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