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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 9.91 (search)
Gen. J. J. Archer. 5th Alabama Battalion. 19th Georgia. In Archer's brigade August 9th, according to his report of Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 1st TenSlaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 1st Tennessee, (Prov. Army.) 7th Tennessee. 14th Tennessee. Thomas's Brigade. Brig.-Gen. E. L. Thomas. 14th Georgia. 19th Georgia. In Archer's brigade August 9th, according to his report of Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade Cedar Run or Slaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 35th Georgia. 45th Georgia. 49th Georgia. Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker. Braxton's Virginia Battery, (Fredericksburg Artillery.) Crenshaw's Virginia Battery. DavidsSlaughter Mountain, and in Thomas's brigade August 30th, according to Surgeon Guild's report of casualties. 35th Georgia. 45th Georgia. 49th Georgia. Artillery. Lieutenant-Colonel R. L. Walker. Braxton's Virginia Battery, (Fredericksburg Artillery.) Crenshaw's Virginia Battery. Davidson's Virginia Battery, (Letcher Artillery.) Latham's North Carolina, (Branch Artillery.) McIntosh's South Carolina Battery, (Pee Dee Artillery.) Pegram's Virginia Battery, (Purcell Artillery.) Ewell's division. Major-General R. S. Ewell. Brigad
n August 9th Jackson arrived within eight miles of Culpeper Court House and found the foe in his front near Cedar Run and a short distance west and north of Slaughter Mountain. When first seen, the cavalry in large force occupied a ridge to the right of the road. A battery opened upon it and soon forced it to retire. Our fire weeping near the Culpeper road, while General Ewell with his two remaining brigades diverged from the road to the right, advancing along the western slope of Slaughter Mountain. General Early, forming his brigade in line of battle, moved into the open field, and, passing a short distance to the right of the road but parallel to it,r hands. Our killed were 229, wounded 1,047, total 1,276. The loss on the other side exceeded 1,500, of whom nearly 300 were taken prisoners. The victory of Cedar Run effectually checked the invader for the time; it soon became apparent, however, that his army was receiving a large increase. The corps of Major General Burnsid
tain, 589. General, 266, 268. Judge John A., Member of Confederate peace commission, 521. Report of peace commission to Davis, 522-23. Canby, General, 474, 588, 591-92, 624, 628. Carondelet (gunboat), 25. Carpenter, —, court decision concerning seizure of goods, 291-92. Carpetbag rule, 641. Carr, General, 39. Michael, 200. Carroll, General, 37. Prison, 414. Carter, Colonel, 303-06, 558. Abner, 201. Casey, General, 129. Cash, Colonel, 601. Castlereagh, Viscount, 7. Cedar Run, Battle of, 265-69. Chalmers, General J. R., 43, 50, 548. Description of battle of Shiloh, 50-51. Chambersburg, Pa., burned, 448. Chancellorsville, Battles of, 300-08, 309. Account of Taylor, 309-10. Charleston, S. C., 174-75. Harbor defense, 171-72. Evacuation, 533. Chase, Judge, 518, 635. Chattanooga, Tenn., battles around, 358-65. Cheatham, General, 41, 44, 46, 359, 360, 361, 486, 489, 490, 534. Chickamauga, Battle of, 358-62. Chickamauga (warship), 222, 237.
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
position that, although for five precious days Lee sought diligently by feints and demonstrations to find a favorable opening, his efforts were vain. But to do nothing was to lose the campaign. By a bold raid of Stuart's, however, Lee now had the good luck to turn the tables and come into possession of Pope's private despatch book, with copies of his most important correspondence with Lincoln, Halleck, and others. Stuart had gotten Lee's permission to try to burn a railroad bridge over Cedar Run, near Catlett's Station, some 12 miles in rear of Pope's army. With about 1500 cavalry and two guns, he crossed the Rappahannock at Waterloo Bridge, above Pope's right flank, on Aug. 22, and pushed on through Warrenton toward Catlett's Station. A terrific rain-storm came on late in the afternoon, and in it the command captured the enemy's picket and surprised the Federal encampments. The night was memorable for black darkness, the time being just at the change of the moon. A negro reco
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
who is on the road from Fayetteville, probably in the direction of Bealeton. Say to Banks, also, that he had best run back the railroad trains to this side of Cedar Run. If he is not with you, write him to that effect. By command of Major-General Pope. George D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. Maj.-Gen. F.-J. Porter, Wd till he comes up, with instructions to follow you immediately. If Banks is not at the Junction, instruct Colonel Cleary to run the trains back to this side of Cedar Run, and post a regiment and section of artillery with it. By command of Major-General Pope. George D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. When this order walate Huger's) divisions. Longstreet is said by a deserter to be very strong. They have much artillery and long wagon-trains. The raid on the railroad was near Cedar Run, and made by a regiment of infantry, two squadrons of cavalry, and a section of artillery. The place was guarded by nearly three regiments of infantry and some
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trimble, Isaac Ridgeway 1802- (search)
reak of the Civil War, when he took command of the nonuniformed volunteers recruited to defend Baltimore from Northern soldiers. In the same year he was made colonel of engineers in Virginia and directed the construction of the field works and forts at Norfolk; was promoted brigadier-general on finishing that work, and then took charge of the location and construction of the batteries at Evansport on the Potomac River. With these batteries he blockaded the river against United States vessels during the winter of 1861-62. He also participated and won distinction in various battles, including Gaines's Mills, Slaughter's Mountain, Second Bull Run, Chancellorsville, etc.; was promoted major-general for gallantry and meritorious services April 23, 1863. During the third day of the action at Gettysburg he lost a leg, was captured, and held a prisoner at Johnson's Island for twenty-one months before being exchanged. After the war he settled in Baltimore, Md., where he died, Jan. 2, 1888.
ble repulses on various occasions, they certainly made considerable progress in occupying important portions and positions of the Confederacy. In 1861 were fought the battles of Bethel, June 10th; Manassas, July 21st; Ball's Bluff, October 21st—in Virginia; and in Missouri the battles of Springfield, August 10th; Lexington, September 21st; Belmont, November 7th. In 1862 the battle of Seven Pines, May 31st; Port Republic, June 8th; the seven days battles near Richmond, at the end of June; Cedar Run, July 19th; second Manassas, July 29th, 30th, 31st—in Virginia; followed by Boonsboroa and Sharpsburg, on the 14th and 17th of September. In the West there were fought the battle of Elkhorn, in Arkansas, March 5th; Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, Tennessee, on the 5th and 16th of February; and Shiloh, in North Mississippi, on the 6th and 7th of April. The Confederate States lost the harbor of Port Royal, South Carolina, November 7th, 1861; Norfolk, with its Navy Yard, May, 1862; and also P
Moved to Grafton February 19, and duty there till March 31. Moved to Green Spring River March 31, thence to Romney April 10. Ordered to join Milroy at Monterey. Battle of McDowell May 8. March to the Shenandoah Valley May 26-29. Near Franklin May 26. Harrisonburg June 6. Battle of Cross Keys June 8. At Middletown till July 7, and at Sperryville till August 8. Reconnoissance to Madison Court House July 16-19. Battle of Cedar Mountain August 9 (Reserve). Slaughter Mountain August 10. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. Catlett's Station August 22. Battles of Bull Run August 28-30. Duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till December. Reconnoissance to Bristoe Station and Warrenton Junction September 25-28. Moved to Fredericksburg December 12-16. Mud March January 20-24, 1863. At Falmouth till April. Chancellorsville Campaign April 27-May 6. Battle of Chancellorsville May 1-5. Gettysburg (Pa.) C
oad trains, 296, 297. Carney Guards, 321. Carney, William H., 81, 84, 90. Carter, H. J., 249. Cary house, 284, 310. Casualties—general— James Island, 63; assault Wagner, 88; siege Wagner, 126; attempt on Sumter, 128; Olustee, 172; James Island, 216; Honey Hill, 252; Devaux's Neck, 258. Casualties—in regiment—James Island, 63; assault Wagner, 90, 91; siege Wagner, 126; Olustee, 173; James Island, 204, 205; Honey Hill, 252; Boykin's Mills, 304. Catskill, monitor, 111. Cedar Run, Fla., 175, 176, 178,183. Celebration of Emancipation, 144. Cezar, G. G., 163, 232. Champlin, Jason, 183. Chandler, Peleg W., 8. Chaplains, 118, 149, 232. Charleston, S. C., 36, 54, 109, 112,113, 114, 120, 133, 135, 139, 141, 143, 145, 190, 194, 195, 199, 207, 215, 219, 222, 225, 226, 227, 228, 230, 232, 233, 235, 240, 264, 267, 270, 275, 277, 279, 280, 281, 284, 288, 289, 295, 305, 309, 310, 311, 312. Charleston and Savannah Railroad, 52, 193, 199, 238, 240, 256, 258, 259, 262, 2
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 7: the Army of Virginia under General PopeBattle of Cedar Mountain. (search)
road. We soon came to where Ricketts' division, of three brigades of McDowell's corps, was watching the road which turns off from the Orange Court House and Culpeper road to Madison Court House. These troops were stripped of harness, and taking their ease under shelter tents. We passed them and pushed onward, until in the Second regiment one recruit fell dead from exhaustion, and many veterans of a year were disabled; onward for about five miles, until before us, high in air, rose Slaughter Mountain, We called it Cedar Mountain. bearing southwest from Crawford's brigade, which was drawn up in line of battle. When I arrived at Cedar Creek, though all was quiet, I felt in the air an impending battle. The cavalry were still in our front, but not far; Crawford's skirmishers were deployed through the woods; and there too was General Roberts, a staff-officer sent by Pope to designate the ground Banks was to hold, and to give him instructions. It was about twelve o'clock at noon
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