Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Slaughter Mountain (Virginia, United States) or search for Slaughter Mountain (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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rt, the rebels showing their front upon Slaughter's Mountain, a sugarloaf eminence, situated two milationed in position at what is known as Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles distant from Culpeper. Abr Mountain, or, as it is called by many, Slaughter-Mountain. In this direction General Banks moved.so many noble dead and dying been called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford andld we had artillery enough to have blown Slaughter Mountain from its base, but by the superior skills with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. s with the enemy, we learn that the fight at Cedar Run, on Saturday last, was the most desperate anks's corps, in the direction of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain, to support Gen. Bayard, who was fallingeither fall back and meet Heintzelman behind Cedar Run, or cross the Rappahannock with my whole forClary to run the trains back to this side of Cedar Run, and to post a regiment and section of artil[2 more...]
private died, on the march, the regiment reached a wood near Slaughter's Mountain, and some sixteen hundred yards from the enemy's position, wt a mile and more apart, the rebels showing their front upon Slaughter's Mountain, a sugarloaf eminence, situated two miles to the west of the at Mitchell's station. Our front was on much lower ground, with Cedar Run in our rear and a small wooded ridge behind that. Gradually, fame upon the enemy stationed in position at what is known as Slaughter's Mountain, eight miles distant from Culpeper. About eleven A. M. a darom a party near Cedar Mountain, or, as it is called by many, Slaughter-Mountain. In this direction General Banks moved. Four or five miles s the spot where lie so many noble dead and dying been called Slaughter Mountain. The brigade of Generals Crawford and Gordon, occupying ther and the battle-field we had artillery enough to have blown Slaughter Mountain from its base, but by the superior skill of some one, only fo
Rebel reports and narratives. General Jackson's report. headquarters valley District, August 12--6 1/2 P. M. Colonel: On the evening of the ninth instant, God blessed our arms with another victory. The battle was near Cedar Run, about six miles from Culpeper Court-House. The enemy, according to the statement of prisoners, consisted of Banks's, McDowell's, and Sigel's commands. We have over four hundred prisoners, including Brig.-Gen. Prince. While our list of killed is less thaag of truce. Lynchburgh Republican account. Lynchburgh, Va., August 15. From an officer of the Stonewall brigade, one who has followed its fortunes in all its desperate and bloody encounters with the enemy, we learn that the fight at Cedar Run, on Saturday last, was the most desperate and determined of any that he has yet witnessed. The enemy's cavalry first advanced upon our column in heavy force, and were suffered to approach within a few yards of our men, when the whole line po
of the enemy and the lower fords of the Rappahannock. Early in the day I pushed forward Crawford's brigade, of Banks's corps, in the direction of Cedar or Slaughter Mountain, to support Gen. Bayard, who was falling back in that direction, and to assist him as far as practicable in determining the movements and the forces of the above, and my rear is entirely exposed if I move toward Sulphur Springs or Warrenton. I must do one of two things: either fall back and meet Heintzelman behind Cedar Run, or cross the Rappahannock with my whole force and assail the enemy's flank and rear. I must do one or the other at daylight. Which shall it be? I incline to up, with instructions to follow you immediately upon his doing so. If Banks is not at the Junction, instruct Col. Clary to run the trains back to this side of Cedar Run, and to post a regiment and section of artillery with it. By command of General Pope. Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smit