hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 62 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 62 results in 21 document sections:

1 2 3
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
& nephew to Heber, of the posteritie of Sem. But this seemeth to be nothing but a conjecture taken out of the likenes of the name Asarmathes. For the dwelling of all Joktans posteritie is described by Moses to have bene betwixt Mescha or Masius (an hil of the Ammonites) & Sephace, nere to the river Euphrates : which maketh it very unlikely that Asarmathes should plant any colonies so far off in ye North & northwest countries. It is bounded northward by the Lappes & the North Ocean. On the Southside by the Tartars called Crimmes. Eastward they have the Nagaian Tartar, that possesseth all the countrey on the East side of Volga towards the Caspian sea. On the West and Southwest border lieth Lituania , Livonia and Polonia . The whole Countrey being nowe reduced under the government of one, conteineth these chiefe Provinces or Shires. Volodemer, (which beareth the first place in the Emperours stile, because their house came of the Dukes of that Countrey) Mosco, Nisnovogrod, Plesko, S
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Locke to Jerusalem. (search)
lew so hard and contrary, that we could not. This citie of Ragusa paieth tribute to the Turke yerely fourteene thousand Sechinos, and every Sechino is of venetian money eight livers and two soldes, besides other presents which they give to the Turkes Bassas when they come thither. The Venetians have a rocke or cragge within a mile of the said towne, for the which the Raguseos would give them much money, but they doe keepe it more for the namesake, then for profite. This rocke lieth on the Southside of the towne, and is called 11 cromo, there is nothing on it but onely a Monasterie called Sant Jeronimo. The maine of the Turkes countrie is bordering on it within one mile, for the which cause they are in great subjection. This night wee were put backe by contrarie windes, and ankered at Melleda. The 24 being at an anker under Melleda, we would have gone on land, but the winde came so faire that we presently set sayle and went our course, and left on the right hand of us the forenamed
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Neustat. The 3. day to dinner at Bamberg : and before wee came (search)
urt and residence, in a marveilous goodly place, with divers gardens and houses of pleasure, which is at the least two English miles in compasse, and the three parts thereof joyne upon the sea: and on the Northeast part of the Citie on the other side of the water over against the Citie is the Towne of Pera, where the most part of the Christians do lye. And there also wee did lye. And on the North part of the saide Towne is the Arsenal, where the Galies are built and doe remaine: And on the Southside is all the Ordinance, artilerie, and houses of munition. Note that by the way as wee came from Ragusa to Constantinople, wee left on our right hand the Countreys of Albania, and Macedonia , and on the left hande the countreys of Bosnia , Bulgaria , and the river of Danubius . The 14. of September was the Turkes Beyram, that is, one of their chiefest feastes. The 15. we went to the blacke Sea called Pontus Euxinus, and there upon a rocke we sawe a piller of white Marble that was se
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
y brought unto us roials of plate, giving us them for Calicut cloth: which roials they finde by diving for them in the Sea, which were lost not long before in two Portugall ships which were bound for China and were cast away there. They call in their language the Coco Calambe, the Plantane Pison, a Hen Jam, a Fish Iccan, a Hog Babee. From thence we returned the 21 of November to goe for the Iland of Zeilan, and arrived there about the third of December 1592. and ankered upon the Southside in sixe fadomes water, where we lost our anker, the place being rockie and foule ground. Then we ranne along the Southwest part of the sayd Iland, to a place called Punta del Galle, where we ankered, determining there to have remained untill the comming of the Bengala Fleet of seven or eight ships, and the Fleete of Pegu of two or three sailes, and the Portugall shippes of Tanaseri being a great Baie to the Southward of Martabam in the kingdom of Siam : which ships, by divers intelligences
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
e, and conferred them with the Mappes and Globes both Antique and Moderne: I came in fine to the fourth part of the world, commonly called America , which by all descriptions I found to bee an Iland environed round about with Sea, having on the Southside of it the frete or straight of Magellan, on the West side Mar del Sur, which Sea runneth towards the North, separating it from the East parts of Asia, where the Dominions of the Cathaians are: On the East part our West Ocean, and on the North se the whole yeere, and that presently the Masons and Carpenters might goe in hande therewith. First therefore they perused the Bils of lading, what every man received into his Shippe, and found that there was arrived onely the Eastside, and the Southside of the house, and yet not that perfect and entier: for many pieces thereof were used for fenders in many Shippes, and so broken in pieces whilest they were distressed in the yce. Also after due examination had, and true account taken, there was
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by Sir Humphrey Gilbert Knight, to prove a passage by the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. (search)
prove by authoritie a passage to be on the Northside of America, to goe to Cathaia, and the East India. Chapter 1. WHEN I gave my selfe to the studie of Geographic, after I had perused and diligently scanned the descriptions of Europe, Asia & Afrike, and conferred them with the Mappes and Globes both Antique and Moderne: I came in fine to the fourth part of the world, commonly called America , which by all descriptions I found to bee an Iland environed round about with Sea, having on the Southside of it the frete or straight of Magellan, on the West side Mar del Sur, which Sea runneth towards the North, separating it from the East parts of Asia, where the Dominions of the Cathaians are: On the East part our West Ocean, and on the North side the sea that severeth it from Groneland, thorow which Northren Seas the Passage lyeth, which I take now in hand to discover. Plato in Timaeo, and in the Dialogue called Critias, discourseth of an incomparable great Iland then called Atlantis,
prove by authoritie a passage to be on the Northside of America, to goe to Cathaia, and the East India. Chapter 1. WHEN I gave my selfe to the studie of Geographic, after I had perused and diligently scanned the descriptions of Europe, Asia & Afrike, and conferred them with the Mappes and Globes both Antique and Moderne: I came in fine to the fourth part of the world, commonly called America , which by all descriptions I found to bee an Iland environed round about with Sea, having on the Southside of it the frete or straight of Magellan, on the West side Mar del Sur, which Sea runneth towards the North, separating it from the East parts of Asia, where the Dominions of the Cathaians are: On the East part our West Ocean, and on the North side the sea that severeth it from Groneland, thorow which Northren Seas the Passage lyeth, which I take now in hand to discover. Plato in Timaeo, and in the Dialogue called Critias, discourseth of an incomparable great Iland then called Atlantis,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
, as with other provision for the habitation. The ninth of August the Generall with the Captaynes of his counsell assembled together, and began to consider and take order for the erecting up of the house or Fort for them that were to inhabite there the whole yeere, and that presently the Masons and Carpenters might goe in hande therewith. First therefore they perused the Bils of lading, what every man received into his Shippe, and found that there was arrived onely the Eastside, and the Southside of the house, and yet not that perfect and entier: for many pieces thereof were used for fenders in many Shippes, and so broken in pieces whilest they were distressed in the yce. Also after due examination had, and true account taken, there was found want of drinke and fuel to serve one hundreth men, which was the number appoynted first to inhabite there, because their greatest store was in the Shippes which were not yet arrived. Then Captaine Fenton seeing the scarcitie of the necessary t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The third voyage of Captaine Frobisher, pretended for the discoverie of Cataia, by Meta Incognita, Anno Do. 1578. (search)
, as with other provision for the habitation. The ninth of August the Generall with the Captaynes of his counsell assembled together, and began to consider and take order for the erecting up of the house or Fort for them that were to inhabite there the whole yeere, and that presently the Masons and Carpenters might goe in hande therewith. First therefore they perused the Bils of lading, what every man received into his Shippe, and found that there was arrived onely the Eastside, and the Southside of the house, and yet not that perfect and entier: for many pieces thereof were used for fenders in many Shippes, and so broken in pieces whilest they were distressed in the yce. Also after due examination had, and true account taken, there was found want of drinke and fuel to serve one hundreth men, which was the number appoynted first to inhabite there, because their greatest store was in the Shippes which were not yet arrived. Then Captaine Fenton seeing the scarcitie of the necessary t
, as with other provision for the habitation. The ninth of August the Generall with the Captaynes of his counsell assembled together, and began to consider and take order for the erecting up of the house or Fort for them that were to inhabite there the whole yeere, and that presently the Masons and Carpenters might goe in hande therewith. First therefore they perused the Bils of lading, what every man received into his Shippe, and found that there was arrived onely the Eastside, and the Southside of the house, and yet not that perfect and entier: for many pieces thereof were used for fenders in many Shippes, and so broken in pieces whilest they were distressed in the yce. Also after due examination had, and true account taken, there was found want of drinke and fuel to serve one hundreth men, which was the number appoynted first to inhabite there, because their greatest store was in the Shippes which were not yet arrived. Then Captaine Fenton seeing the scarcitie of the necessary t
1 2 3