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. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Secessionville, S. C. 27 Ware Bottom Church, Va. 3 Pinckney Island, S. C. 5 Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864 16 Morris Island, S. C. 7 Deep Bottom, Va. 28 Fort Wagner, S. C. (assault) 12 New Market Road, Va., Oct. 7, 1864 5 Siege of Fort Wagner, S. C. 5 Darbytown Road, Va., Oct. 13, 1864 1 Chester Station, Va. 1 Charles City Road, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 8 Drewry's Bluff, Va. 66 Fort Fisher, N. C. 5 Bermuda Hundred, Va. 8 Sugar Loaf Hill, N. C. 1 Present, also, at Pocotaligo; St. John's River; Pilatka. notes.--Organized at Concord in August, 1861, and left the State on Sept. 3d. After a short stay, successively, at Long Island, Washington, Annapolis, and Fort Monroe, it arrived November 4th at Port Royal, S. C. Remaining at Hilton Head and its vicinity, the regiment was not under fire until the affair at Secessionville, June 16, 1862, where, under command of Colonel Jackson, it established a reputation for gallant
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, United States Colored Troops. (search)
lt on and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. d capture of Fort Fisher, N. C., January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. d capture of Fort Fisher, N. C., January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fosault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Sugar Loaf Battery February 11. sault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fosault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fosault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fosault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fosault and capture of Fort Fisher January 15. Sugar Loaf Hill January 19. Federal Point February 11. Fo
aid out, across the plain, coming out upon the Menotomy road, at or near where the railroad bridge at North Somerville now stands, that being the point where Winters brook crosses the Menotomy road. The two bridges referred to were over Winters and Twopenny brooks, and the Sorrelly plain was situated between Main street and Broadway on the north and south, and between the two brooks on the east and west. The Sugar Loaf road (leading from Woburn street across Winthrop street, east of Sugar Loaf hill, into the woodlands) Ramshead and Brooks lanes were laid out as ways to the woodlots and pastures in the north part of the town. The irregular course of Brooks lane at its southerly end, with its sharply defined angles, as shown on the map, suggests that at some former time its location had been changed. Powder House road was the way to the Powder House, which now stands on land of Dr. Green, on the easterly side of Highland avenue. The easterly branch of Ramshead lane is suppos
d Shaw with his express came not till ‘71, nor was he located beside Whitmore Brook till five years later. Cunningham's omnibus made no trips to Medford Square, nor did, indeed, till ‘76, while the bobtail car which succeeded the omnibus would at that day have been deemed a wild enterprise. Purchase street (now Winthrop), had been open some twenty-five years, and Woburn street, once the main road to Boston, was but little used, as the northern travel came not up Marm Simond's Hill. Sugar Loaf Hill had not been cut out so widely, nor yet by the action of the stone-crusher granulated and spread on Medford streets, to sweeten the experiences of travel. Purchase street was Medford's Via Dolorosa—the way to the almshouse and the silent city of the dead. Mystic Hill, rocky and bare at its top, was beginning to be invaded by dwellers, but they were few and far apart. Nestled in a little hollow on its western slope was a pond, whose denizens in the good old summer time made night melo<
. Patten and partly by Henry Putnam, westerly by lately Whitmores, southwest by country road or any other way reputed to be bounded. By comparison we conclude that this country road was Woburn street, and the Turell purchase lay just beyond the present Wyman street, in the angle of the old lane or wood road, still existing and bordered by elm trees extending to Winthrop, formerly Purchase street. The latter laid out and built nearly a century ago was filled to grade with material from Sugar Loaf hill. Noting the bounds of each conveyance, we come to the conclusion that Putnam's twenty-four-acre pasture lay between the present Sarah Fuller home and the grim old stone lion which lies crouched on the hill slope opposite the Sugar Loaf. So much for his pasture, now for his dwelling. A deed from Samuel Brooks of Exeter, N. H., Gentleman Thomas Brooks of Medford, Gentleman and Edward Brooks of Medford, Clerk (for so the record reads), for a proper and sufficient consideration hav