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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 28 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Anthony Jenkinson, made from the citie of Mosco in Russia , to the citie of Boghar in Bactria , in the yeere 1558: written by himself to the Merchants of London of the Moscovie companie. (search)
arrived at New Astracan, which this Emperour of Russia conquered sixe yeeres past, in the yeere 1552. It is from the Mosco unto Astracan sixe hundreth leagues, or thereabout. The towne of Astracan is situated in an Island upon a hill side, having a castle within the same, walled about with earth and timber, neither faire nor strong: The towne is also walled about with earth: the buildings and houses (except it be the captaines lodging, and certaine other gentlemens) most base and simple. The Island is most destitute and barren of wood and pasture, and the ground will beare no corne: the aire is there most infected, by reason (as I suppose) of much fish, and specially Sturgion, by which onely the inhabitants live, having great scarsitie of flesh and bread. They hang up their fish in their streets and houses to dry for their provision, which causeth such abundance of flies to increase there, as the like was never seene in any land, to their great plague. And at my being at the sayd As
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The way and distances from Saint Nicholas to the Caspian Sea. (search)
Danzickers put in old cable and rotten stuffe, which in fowle weather is found of no strength. Sosnova, a tree that cureth the wolfe with the shavings of the wood, groweth in these parts, and of the barks they make ropes as big as a mans arme for their boats. The Samoeds lacking linnen make handkerchiefs and towels of the very wood of this tree. The wood of this tree is as heavie as hollie, and the shavings tough. Rose Island in S. Nicholas Baie is full of Roses damaske and red, of violets and wild Rosemarie: This Island is neere 7. or 8. miles about, and good pasture, and hath the name of the roses. The snow here about the midst of May is cleared, having bin two moneths in melting, then the ground is made dry within 14. dayes after, and then the grasse is knee high within a moneth. Then after September the frost commeth in, the snow is a yard deepe upon plaine ground. The Island hath Firre and Birch, and a faire fresh spring neere the house built there by the English.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter sent to the right Honorable Sir William Cecill Lord Burghley, Lord high Treasurer of England &c. From M. Thomas James of Bristoll, concerning the discoverie of the Isle of Ramea, dated the 14 of September. 1591. (search)
e 14 of September. 1591. RIGHT Honourable, my humble duetie to your good Lordship done, I thought good humbly to advertise your honour of the discovery of an Island made by two smal shippes of Saint Malo; the one 8 daies past being prised neare Silley, by a ship of which I am part owner, called the Pleasure, sent by this citie to my Lord Thomas Howard, for her Majesties service. Which prise is sent backe to this Port by those of the sayd shippes, with upwards of fortie tunnes of Traine. The Island lyeth in 47. degrees, some fiftie leagues from the grand Bay, neere Newfoundland : and is about twentie leagues about, and some part of the Island is flat Sands and shoulde: and the fish commeth on banke (to do their kinde) in April May & June, by numbers of thousands, which fish is very big: and hath two great teeth: and the skinne of them is like Buffes leather: and they will not away from their yong ones. The yong ones are as good meat as Veale. And with the bellies of five of the said
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Charles Leigh, and divers others to Cape Briton and the Isle of Ramea. (search)
e it hath great abundance of cod-fish. We were on land in it in foure severall places: 1 At Caplin bay and Farrillon: 2 At Cape Rase: 3 At the harborow of Lano, which lieth foure leagues to the West beyond Cape Laurence: 4 At S. Marie port. The Island of Menego for the soile is much like Newfoundland , but the fish about it, as also throwout the Grande Bay within Cape Briton, is much larger and better then that of the Newfoundland . This Island is scant two leagues long, and very narrow. Insland wee found to be very good, and sandy ground. It hath in it store of firre trees. It is somewhat more then a league long, and about three leagues in compasse. Here we were on land once, and went from the one side of it to the other. The Island of Ramea we tooke to be like ground as Brions Island, having also abundance of firre trees. It seemeth to be in length about twelve or thirteene leagues at least. We were there in harborow, but not on shore, which we much desired, and hoped t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Certaine observations touching the countreys and places where we travelled. (search)
e it hath great abundance of cod-fish. We were on land in it in foure severall places: 1 At Caplin bay and Farrillon: 2 At Cape Rase: 3 At the harborow of Lano, which lieth foure leagues to the West beyond Cape Laurence: 4 At S. Marie port. The Island of Menego for the soile is much like Newfoundland , but the fish about it, as also throwout the Grande Bay within Cape Briton, is much larger and better then that of the Newfoundland . This Island is scant two leagues long, and very narrow. Insland wee found to be very good, and sandy ground. It hath in it store of firre trees. It is somewhat more then a league long, and about three leagues in compasse. Here we were on land once, and went from the one side of it to the other. The Island of Ramea we tooke to be like ground as Brions Island, having also abundance of firre trees. It seemeth to be in length about twelve or thirteene leagues at least. We were there in harborow, but not on shore, which we much desired, and hoped t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
gone this course, then put your selfe in what heigth you will, and make your way as you will your selfe. But if you passe the chanell in the Summer time towards Spaine, stir away Eastnortheast, and you shall passe by the North side of Bermuda ; and when you have brought your selfe in 35. degrees, stirre East and by North untill you bring your selfe to 25. degrees and 1/2, and from thence stir away East for the Isle of Fayal or of Flores . Markes to know the Isle of Fayal. THE Island called Fayal upon the Southwest side, maketh an high hill or loafe like to the top of Brasilla in the Island of Terzera; and behinde that high Pike or loafe is an harbour called Puerto Pini, and upon the East side it maketh a little plaine Island; and upon the North side there standeth a rocke or Island by it selfe. And from this Island being one of the Azores , you may shape your course to which of the Islands you please, or to any other place which you know. Markes to k
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A principal ruttier conteining most particular directions to saile from S. Lucar in Andaluzia by the Isles of the Canaries, the small Isles called Las Antillas, along the South parts of the Isles of S. Juan de Puerto rico, Hispaniola and Cuba : and from Cabo de Corrientes, or Cabo de S. Anton without and within the litle Isles called Los Alacranes, to the port of S. Juan de Ullua in Nueva Espanna: and the course from thence backe againe by Havana , and through the Chanell of Bahama to Spaine: together with the speciall markes of all the Capes, Islands, and other places by the way; and a briefe declaration of their latitudes and longitudes. (search)
gone this course, then put your selfe in what heigth you will, and make your way as you will your selfe. But if you passe the chanell in the Summer time towards Spaine, stir away Eastnortheast, and you shall passe by the North side of Bermuda ; and when you have brought your selfe in 35. degrees, stirre East and by North untill you bring your selfe to 25. degrees and 1/2, and from thence stir away East for the Isle of Fayal or of Flores . Markes to know the Isle of Fayal. THE Island called Fayal upon the Southwest side, maketh an high hill or loafe like to the top of Brasilla in the Island of Terzera; and behinde that high Pike or loafe is an harbour called Puerto Pini, and upon the East side it maketh a little plaine Island; and upon the North side there standeth a rocke or Island by it selfe. And from this Island being one of the Azores , you may shape your course to which of the Islands you please, or to any other place which you know. Markes to k
Markes to know the Isle of Fayal. THE Island called Fayal upon the Southwest side, maketh an high hill or loafe like to the top of Brasilla in the Island of Terzera; and behinde that high Pike or loafe is an harbour called Puerto Pini, and upon the East side it maketh a little plaine Island; and upon the North side there standeth a rocke or Island by it selfe. And from this Island being one of the Azores , you may shape your course to which of the Islands you please, or to any other place which you know.
through their Zenith over their heads, by meanes whereof they have two Summers, & being so neere the heate of the line, they never lose the heate of the Sunne so much, but the fruites have their increase and continuance in the midst of Winter. The Island is wonderfully stored with goates and wilde hennes, and it hath salt also without labour, save onely that the people gather it into heapes, which continually in great quantitie is increased upon the sands by the flowing of the sea, and the recuncustomed (the value whereof I cannot learne) consisting of pearles, precious stones, reals of plate, and other things of great worth. With all this purchase he sayled toward Nueva Espanna; and at an Island lying before that coast called The Island of Cano hee discharged all things out of his shippe and graved her, and remained there ten dayes. From thence hee went along the coast of Nueva Espanna, where hee tooke certaine ships laden with spices, silkes, and velvets, but no golde nor si
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The famous voyage of Sir Francis Drake into the South sea, and therehence about the whole Globe of the earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord, 1577. (search)
: and that season being with us the depth of Winter, it may seeme strange that those fruites were then there growing: but the reason thereof is this, because they being betweene the Tropike and the Equinoctiall, the Sunne passeth twise in the yeere through their Zenith over their heads, by meanes whereof they have two Summers, & being so neere the heate of the line, they never lose the heate of the Sunne so much, but the fruites have their increase and continuance in the midst of Winter. The Island is wonderfully stored with goates and wilde hennes, and it hath salt also without labour, save onely that the people gather it into heapes, which continually in great quantitie is increased upon the sands by the flowing of the sea, and the receiving heate of the Sunne kerning the same, so that of the increase thereof they keepe a continuall traffique with their neighbours. Amongst other things we found here a kind of fruit called Cocos, which because it is not commonly knowen with us
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