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John Esten Cooke, Wearing of the Gray: Being Personal Portraits, Scenes, and Adventures of War., From the Rapidan to Frying-Pan in October, 1863. (search)
e infantry having few opportunities to become engaged-and I shall ask the reader to follow Stuart and his horsemen. I think it was the morning of the ioth of October when, moving on the right of the long column of Ewell and Hill then streaming toward Madison Court-House, Stuart came on the exterior picket of the enemy-their advance force of cavalry, infantry, and artillery, being near the little village of James City. The picket on a little stream was driven in, and pushing on to Thoroughfare Mountain (not to be confounded with that near Manassas), we ran into a regiment of infantry which had hastily formed line of battle at the noise of the firing. Gordon, that gallant North Carolinian, at once became hotly engaged; but there was no time to stop long. Stuart took Young's brigade-he had but two-and, making a detour to the left, charged straight down upon the enemy's right flank. Cheers, yells, carbines crackingand the infantry broke and scattered in the mountains, dropping lar
December 6. Major-General W. T. Sherman and staff; accompanied by Brigadier-General Wilson, arrived at General Burnside's headquarters, at Knoxville, Tenn., at noon to-day.--A most successful reconnaissance was made to Madison Court-House, Va., by four squadrons of the First New York Dragoons, under Major Scott, demonstrating that no rebel force existed in that quarter. At James City a few rebels, who fled on the approach of the Nationals, were seen. On Thoroughfare Mountain, the rebel signal-station was found in the possession of some thirty or more cavalry, who at once beat a hasty retreat. They were pursued some distance by Major Scott's men, but without capture. It was found to be a good position for its past uses, as well as in turn to be used against them, as from it the position of nearly the whole rebel army can be seen. The destruction was made as complete as possible.--the National iron-clad Weehawken, during a terrific storm, sunk at her anchorage at the entranc
iew. We had the Yankees on what is called a big drive. Some of the incidents of the campaign may be interesting. One division of the cavalry corps, under General Fitz Lee, was left on the Rapidan, to watch the enemy below, while General Stuart advanced with Hampton's division to protect the flank of the army, then moving toward Madison Court-House, from observation. This division consisted of the brigades of Gordon, Young, and Jones; Colonel Funsten commanding the latter. At Thoroughfare Mountain, General Gordon, whose brigade led the advance, encountered a regiment of infantry, and attacked with his habitual gallantry and skill. A brisk action ensued between the opposing sharp-shooters, the enemy giving way from the first. Just as they were breaking, Young's brigade, which General Stuart had taken round to the left, came down in a thundering charge on the flank of the Federals, and dispersed, killed, or captured nearly the entire party of about four hundred infantry and th
rosses Robertson's River, as a support to the cavalry of Gen. Buford, in front of him. Gen. Bayard, with four regiments of cavalry, was posted near Rapidan station, the point where the Orange and Alexandria road crosses Rapidan River, with his pickets extended as far to the east as Raccoon Ford, and connecting with Gen. Buford on his right at Burnett's Ford. From Raccoon Ford to the forks of the Rappahannock, above Falmouth, the Rapidan was lined with cavalry pickets. On the top of Thoroughfare Mountain, about half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and inspected the corps of Major-Gen. Sigel. I remained at Sperryville until four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, during which time I received several reports from the front that the enemy was crossing the Rappahannock at several points between the railroad-crossing of that riv
rosses Robertson's River, as a support to the cavalry of Gen. Buford, in front of him. Gen. Bayard, with four regiments of cavalry, was posted near Rapidan station, the point where the Orange and Alexandria road crosses Rapidan River, with his pickets extended as far to the east as Raccoon Ford, and connecting with Gen. Buford on his right at Burnett's Ford. From Raccoon Ford to the forks of the Rappahannock, above Falmouth, the Rapidan was lined with cavalry pickets. On the top of Thoroughfare Mountain, about half-way between Generals Bayard and Buford, was established a signal-station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court-House. On the seventh I proceeded to Sperryville, and inspected the corps of Major-Gen. Sigel. I remained at Sperryville until four o'clock in the afternoon of that day, during which time I received several reports from the front that the enemy was crossing the Rappahannock at several points between the railroad-crossing of that riv
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
March 15. Capture of Rectortown, Piedmont, Markham, Linden and Front Royal March 15-20. Operations about Middleburg and White Plains March 27-28. Thoroughfare Gap April 2. Warrenton April 6. Near Piedmont April 14. Linden May 15 (Co. O ). Reconnoissance from Front Royal to Browntown May 24. Guard railroad from White Plains to Manassas till May 24, and railroad and gaps of the Blue Ridge till June 23. Joined Banks at Middletown June 29. Reconnoissance to Thoroughfare Mountain August 9. Pope's Campaign in Northern Virginia August 16-September 2. White Sulphur Springs August 24. Bull Run August 30. Maryland Campaign September 6-24. Battle of Antietam September 16-17. Duty at Bolivar Heights till December. Reconnoissance to Lovettsville October 21. Reconnoissance to Rippon, W. Va., November 9. Reconnoissance to Winchester December 2-6. Moved to Fredericksburg, Va., December 10-14. At Stafford Court House till April 27, 1863.
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 7: the Army of Virginia under General PopeBattle of Cedar Mountain. (search)
rps, stationed where the road from Madison Court House to Sperryville crosses Robertson's River. General Bayard, with four regiments of cavalry, was near Rapidan Station, the point where the Orange and Alexandria Railroad crosses Rapidan River, with his pickets extended east to Raccoon Ford, and connecting with Buford at Barnett's Ford. The Rapidan was lined with cavalry pickets from Raccoon Ford to the forks of the Rappahannock above Falmouth; and in addition thereto, on the top of Thoroughfare Mountain, about half-way between Bayard and Buford, there was a signal station, which overlooked the whole country as far south as Orange Court House. Pope's Report. On the morning of the 8th, Pope, who had in person arrived at Culpeper Court House, sent word to Banks to move his corps to that town, and at the same time notified Siegel at Sperryville, to which place he had marched from Luray, to move to the same point. The other important orders given by Pope this day were to Crawfor
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
C. 79, 3; 80, 6; 86, 5 Thompson's Cross-Roads, Va. 74, 1; 81, 6; 100, 1 Thompson's Hill, Miss. 31, 6 Battle of, May 1, 1863. See Porl Gibson, Miss. Thompson's Station, Tenn. 30, 2; 117, 1; 149, A6 Fort Thorn, N. Mex. 54, 1; 98, 1; 171 Thornburg, Va. 74, 1; 100, 1 Thorn Hill, Ala. 76, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, F4 Thornton Station, Va. 7, 1; 22, 6; 100, 1 Thoroughfare Gap, Va. 7, 1; 22, 5-22, 7; 23, 2; 74, 1; 100, 1; 137, A6 Thoroughfare Mountain, Va. 22, 5; 74, 1; 85, 3; 100, 1 Tilton, Ga. 24, 3; 57, 1-57, 3; 58, 2; 63, 4; 88, 2; 101, 6, 101, 8; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, E11 Timber Ridge, W. Va. 100, 1; 137, E2 Timberville, Va. 74, 1; 81, 4; 94, 2; 100, 1; 137, B4 Tippah Creek, Miss. 154, C12 Tipton, Mo. 47, 1; 135-A; 152, D3 Tishomingo Creek, Miss. 63, 3 Tobesofkee Creek, Ga. 101, 21 Todd's Tavern, Va. 41, 1; 45, 1; 55, 3; 74, 1; 81, 1; 94, 7; 96, 3; 100, 1; 117, 1
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
ection between Thoroughfare and Cedar Mountains against Custer, who, being ordered not to open the battle, gradually falls back before it. The main body of the division follows the James City road, which ascends the northern extremity of Thoroughfare Mountain. Kilpatrick awaits the enemy in that position with his second brigade, which Colonel Davies commands since the death of Farnsworth; General Prince, who, with a division of the Third corps, is encamped between Griffinsburg and James City,ar Mountain. At Bethel, Kilpatrick, reinforced by the remainder of Prince's troops, prepares to resist, but Stuart, whose mission is simply to cover Lee's right, is waiting for night at James City. However, the news of the engagement at Thoroughfare Mountain has reached Meade's Headquarters about noon: Hill's movement, being signalled on the road from Madison to Sperryville, cannot leave him in any doubt. The question is no longer to pursue the retreat of the enemy, but to avert the blow whi
e, of them came crowding around the table, clamoring for milk. The farmer and his family, partly through fear, rose up and commenced dealing out to them some milk. But in a shorter time than it has taken me to tell of it, they pounced upon the food like harpies, and the table was cleared of everything except what I had insisted on retaining on my own plate. They informed me that they were part of the escort to the signal corps, and had been driven down by the Confederates from Thoroughfare Mountain, their baggage wagon captured, and several of their number taken prisoners. Proceeding a little further, I descried in the distance a baggage train moving toward Culpeper Court-House. I supposed it to be that of General Cluseret. If so, I fear it has been captured. A considerable force of the enemy were not far from it at the time. As I approached my destination the cannonading had commenced. A line of dust above the woods indicated the road upon which our troops were a
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