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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
eck on the 29th of November, from where it moved to strike the railroad at Grahamville. At Honey Hill, about three miles from Grahamville, the enemy was found and attacked in a strongly fortified position, which resulted, after severe fighting, in our repulse, with a loss of 746 in killed, wounded, and missing. During the night General Hatch withdrew. On the 6th of December General Foster obtained a position covering the Charleston and Savannah Railroad, between the Coosawhatchee and Tulifinny Rivers. Hood, instead of following Sherman, continued his move northward, which seemed to me to be leading to his certain doom. At all events, had I had the power to command both armies, I should not have changed the orders under which he seemed to be acting. On the 26th of October the advance of Hood's army attacked the garrison at Decatur, Ala., but failing to carry the place, withdrew toward Courtland, and succeeded, in the face of our cavalry, in effecting a lodgment on the north si
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
e fortified and firmly held until the remainder of Foster's column came up to his help. It was here that the commanding general first heard, on the 12th of December, of Sherman being before Savannah, when he hastened to meet him, as recorded in the text. By direction of Sherman, he held on to the position near the Charleston and Savannah railway, and after Hardee fled to Charleston he took possession of and occupied the Confederate works at Pocotaligo, and at the railway crossings of the Tullifinny and Coosawhatchie rivers. That doubt was soon removed. Hazen had signaled back to Sherman, I am ready and will assault at once. He did so. It was toward evening of a beautiful day. His bugles sounded a charge, and over abatis and every other obstruction his troops swept impetuously, in the face of a heavy storm of grape and canister shot, up to the parapets and over them, A novel way for scaling the parapets was exhibited in this assault. The front line of soldiers rushed forward
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
for that purpose, he sent Colonel W. W. Wright, superintendent of military roads, to New Berne to prepare for extending the railway from that place to Goldsboroa. Meanwhile, during the delay caused by the floods, some feints were made from Pocotaligo of an advance on Charleston, and thereby Hardee was kept from interfering with Sherman's preparations for his proposed stride. Finally, when the waters had somewhat subsided, and every thing was in readiness for an advance, the posts at the Tullifinny and Coosawhatchie rivers were abandoned as useless and the troops a long the Charleston and Savannah railway were concentrated at Pocotaligo. Sherman's whole army moved forward on the first of February, nearly in a due north course, toward Columbia, the capital of South Carolina. All the roads in that direction had, for weeks, been held by Wheeler's cavalry, who had employed a large force of negroes in felling trees and burning bridges in the expected pathway of Sherman's march. In th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Samuel Jones of operations at Charleston, South Carolina, from December 5th to 27th, 1864. (search)
be thrown thence to any point that might be threatened, the train to remain at Coosawhatchie and be held in readiness to move the troops at any moment. This order, I regret to say, was not promptly obeyed. Dispatches received during the night indicated that the enemy was threatening Coosawhatchie by way of Bee's creek and the Coosawhatchie river. At ten o'clock the morning of the 6th, General Gartrell telegraphed me that the enemy was landing from twelve barges at Gregory's point on Tulifinny river; that he had moved forward a part of his force to meet them. The battalion of South Carolina cadets, having arrived at Pocotaligo, was ordered to guard the Tulifinny trestle, and aid in checking any advance on Coosawhatchie. A section of artillery, supported by the battalion of the Thirty-second Georgia regiment, was ordered to a point on the left of the Tulifinny, from which it was thought it could drive off or annoy the enemy's transports and barges, and I started myself to ride to
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865, Chapter 13: operations about Pocotaligo. (search)
ward the railroad, which, crossing to the Neck by means of a bridge over the Coosawhatchie, ran over the peninsula and left it by another bridge spanning the Tullifinny River. Potter, leading his skirmishers, forced back the enemy's light troops, making a few captures. Brig.-Gen. L. H. Gartrell, the Confederate district commandening immense stores and many guns, retiring to Hardeeville, S. C., across the river. Graham's Neck, occupied by our brigade, is the point of land between the Tullifinny and Pocotaligo rivers. Along its length farther inland than our position was a road from Mackay's Point on the Broad to the State road, which crossed Graham's 1st making a corduroy road from the landing. Innumerable wagons of Sherman's army came and went over the roads, carrying supplies from various landings on the Tullifinny and Pocotaligo rivers to the camp. January 24 was cold but clear, after several days of rain. In accordance with orders received to move when favorable weat
Theodore, 136, 138. Tomlinson, Ezekiel G., 133, 145, 164, 166, 196. Tomlinson, Reuben, 131. Torpedoes, 119, 132,187, 191, 219. Townsend, E. D., 97. Tragedy in regiment, 309. Transfer of recruits, 230. Treadwell, Joshua B., 315, 317. Trenholm, George A., 312. Trotter, James M., 243. Truces, 101, 107, 112, 218, 221, 226. Tucker, Charles E., 34, 85, 90, 105, 133, 183, 191, 219, 233, 237, 264, 266, 291, 292, 297, 311, 317. Tudor, Frederick, 16. Tufts, William, 320. Tullifinny River, S. C., 256, 257, 258, 262, 263, 269. Turkey Creek, S. C., 294. Turner, John W., 157, 185. Turtle River, Ga., 40. Tynes, Battery, 202, 213, 214. U. Uncle Sam, tug, 318. United States Troops (colored). Infantry: Third, 114, 117, 125, 126, 149, 155. Seventh, 210. Eighth, 149, 160, 161, 163, 171, 174, 184. Twenty-First, 176, 188, 201, 222, 231, 282, 310, 311, 312. Twenty-Sixth, 212, 236, 241, 254, 255, 262, 263, 265, 315. Thirty-Second, 219, 236, 238, 241, 244, 247, 255, 257, 259
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
early morning of the 22d, General Brannan marched with all of his troops except the Forty-eighth New York and two companies of engineers, immediately up the road leading to Old Pocotaligo. The force detached was sent by boat up the Broad, and thence up the Coosawhatchie to destroy the railroad bridge over the latter river, where the main column, in case of victory at Pocotaligo, should unite with it in tearing up the railroad on either hand, including the bridge over the Pocotaligo and Tulifinny rivers. If General Brannan had succeeded, he would have cut very effectually the communication between Savannah and Charleston, captured the military stores at Coosawhatchie and Pocotaligo, and inflicted a serious blow to General Beauregard's line of defense. But his expedition signally failed, and he was defeated with brilliant success by Colonel Walker's troops at Old Pocotaligo and at Coosawhatchie bridge. Learning of his landing at Mackay's point and of his advance, Colonel Walker or
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
. White, as a private in Company A, Citadel cadets. with this command he was under fire at Tulifinny river while on duty between Charleston and Savannah, and subsequent to the evacuation of the cityfrequent encounters with the enemy. Most important among these were the engagements on the Tulifinny river, and along the Charleston & Savannah railroad during the greater part of the month of Decemsame year he was transferred to Company B, battalion of State cadets, then stationed at the Tulifinny river. With the latter command he served until captured and paroled near Greenville, S. C., in As captain of Company B, Second regiment, State troops, and took part in the fighting on the Tulifinny river, and was for a time in command of the Second regiment near Adams' run. When Sherman's army as stationed during the summer of 1864 on the Ashepoo river, taking part in the actions on the Tulifinny and Coosawhatchie rivers; was in the fight at Grimbal's causeway, James island, February, 1865