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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
port. attack abandoned. casualties. an artillery raid. the South side. our balloon. Next morning (Tuesday, July 1) we began to pay the penalty for our unimproved opportunity of the day before. Of course, the enemy was gone, and about three miles down the road we came upon his whole army, now united and massed, upon Malvern Hill. This position is a high plateau stretching north from the lowlands along the valley of James River, over which it dominates in high steep hills, with Turkey Run on the west, and Western Run on the east. It is about a mile wide and, for two miles from the river, is open land, rolling and sloping toward the north where it ends in a heavy forest, intersected by marshy streams, with only one good road leading through the forest out upon the plateau. The Rev. L. W. Allen, already mentioned as on the staff of Magruder, was a native of this section, and had described to D. H. Hill its striking features, noting, — its commanding height, the difficul
m, against double his numbers holding McClellan's left. Longstreet had charge of the contest His advance was through fallen timber, tangled underbrush, and hummocky ground on his left, while on his right the head swamp of the western branch of Turkey run was between him and the Federal left. Eager for the fray, Longstreet's men rushed forward, overcame all obstacles, and fell upon McCall's left with such a blow that his men fled, in panic, backward through Hooker's line of battle in their rearich Jackson would advance, and the one leading to Richmond by way of Darbytown, along which would be the advance of Longstreet and those under him. The flanks of this Federal front extended to the edge of the bluffs above the swampy branches of Turkey run. A cloud of sharpshooters covered the front. Couch's corps was behind these, on the right of the road, with Heintzelman's and Sumner's corps in his rear, but farther extended to the east. Morrell was on the left of the Quaker road, with Syke
of the column at a trot. The order of the troops in march was now as follows: first, a small body of cavalry as advance guard, followed at a few rods distance by Gen. French and staff; then came a small regiment of infantry; and after it our right section, followed by the First Brigade of the First Division, Col. Collis commanding; and this, in turn, succeeded in column by the rest of the Battery; then came the remainder of the First Division. In this order the column had just crossed Turkey Run, and was marching along less than half a mile south of where the road, sloping gently down, debouches suddenly on Cedar Run and the little settlement of Auburn on its north bank. A continuous piece of woods stretched along on our right, but on the left was an opening, beyond which also extended another tract of woods. Scarcely had the right section reached the position in column assigned it, before Capt. Clark, assistant chief of artillery, came galloping back to say to Lieut. Granger, G
149, 204, 302, 303, 304, 305, 399, 400, 401, 404, 405, 406, 430. Thompson, Alvin M., 203, 204, 210, 304, 326, 339, 402, 407. Thompson, Chas. D., 203, 205, 206, 326, 398, 402, 404. Thresher, E. D., 204, 205, 208, 209, 304, 306, 349, 406, 407, 440. Torbert, Gen. A. T. A., 243. Townsend, Geo. M., 31, 81, 155, 156, 204, 205, 242, 255, 359, 362, 382, 395, 397, 409, 425, 439. Trefry, Win. A., 149,151, 162, 201, 303, 304, 305, 306, 338. Tremlett, Maj. H. M., 79. Tripp, Lieut. Col., 177. Turkey Run, 133. Tyler, Gen., 241, 243, 250. U. Upperville, 110. V. Vicksburg, 99, 125. W. Wadsworth, Gen., 107. Wapping Heights, 110. Walker, Wm., 68. Warburton, Hiram B., 116, 152, 163, 183, 349, 350, 402. Ward, Franklin, 47, 48, 49, 151. Ward, Gen., J. Hobart, 110, 156. Warren, Gen. G. K., 127, 142, 143, 154, 172, 175, 178, 182, 193, 194, 217, 218, 228, 249, 254, 301, 307, 328, 329, 381. Warrenton, 110, 112, 113, 117, 118, 132, 143, 155, 183. Webb, Gen. A. S., 381, 395
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
8, 1; 135-A; 149, B8 Fortifications and environs, 1863 31, 5 Vicinity of, 1863 34, 4; 35, 3 Tunica, Miss. 154, C9 Tunnel Hill, Ga. 24, 3; 33, 3; 48, 1; 55, 6; 57, 2, 57, 3; 58, 2; 76, 2; 88, 2; 97, 1; 101, 4; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, D11 Tunstall's Station, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 21, 9; 22, 1; 74, 1; 92, 1; 100, 1; 137, E8 Tupelo, Miss. 63, 2; 117, 1; 149, F1; 154, E13 Expedition to, July 5-21, 1864 63, 2 Turkey Creek, Kans. 66, 2, 66, 3 Turkey Run, Va. 85, 35, 85, 38 Turkey Creek, Va. 16, 1; 92, 1; 93, 1; 100, 1 Turkey Island Bridge, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 19, 1; 20, 1; 22, 1; 74, 1; 100, 1, 100, 2; 137, F8 Turkey Island Creek, Va. 17, 1; 22, 1 Turkeytown, Ala. 46, 3; 118, 1; 135-A; 149, G9 Turkeytown Valley, Ala.: Expedition into, Oct. 24-26, 1864 46, 3 Turnback Creek, Mo. 160, B12 Turner's Ferry, Ga. 45, 5; 57, 1, 57, 3; 62, 9, 62, 11, 62, 12; 65, 3; 88, 1, 88, 2 Turner's Mill, Va.