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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 194 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 124 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 22 8 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 20, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
1864.Battle of Peach Tree Creek. July 21, 1864.Engagement at Bald (or Leggett's) Hill. July 22, 1864.Battle of Atlanta. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson in command of the Army of the Tennessee. July 22-24, 1864.Garrard's raid to Covington. July 23, 1864.Brig. Gen. Morgan L. Smith, U. S. Army, in temporary command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. July 23-Aug. 25, 1864.Operations about Atlanta, including battle of Ezra Church (July 28), assault at Utoy Creek (Aug. 6), and other combats. July 24, 1864.Skirmish near Cartersville. July 27, 1864.Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard, U. S. Army, assumes command of the Army of the Tennessee. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan, U. S. Army, resumes command of the Fifteenth Army Corps. Maj. Gen. David S. Stanley, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Oliver O. Howard in command of the Fourth Army Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Cor
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
al Schofield moved from the left on the 1st of August, and General Palmer's corps followed at once, taking a line below Utoy Creek, and General Schofield prolonged it to a point near East Point. The enemy made no offensive opposition, but watched ouGeneral Cox's division, General Schofield's army, on the 5th tried to break through the enemy's line about a mile below Utoy Creek, but failed to carry the position, losing about 400 men, who were caught in the entanglements and abatis, but the next ion was turned by General Hascall, and General Schofield advanced his whole line close up to and facing the enemy below Utoy Creek. Still he did not gain the desired foothold on either the West Point or Macon road. The enemy's line at that time mustawing out and moving rapidly by a circuit well toward Sandtown and across Camp Creek; the Army of the Cumberland, below Utoy Creek, General Schofield, remaining in position. This was effected with the loss of but a single man in the Army of the Tenn
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
and rapidly moved to the right near the poor-house and extending nearly to the north branch of Utoy Creek at Willis' Mill, the engineers giving general directions concerning the lines. I rode over thbject of all our movements. August 3, a portion of the Army of the Ohio was thrown across .Utoy Creek, and established itself on the south side without much opposition. August 4, an attack wasnts had been. The Army of the Ohio was engaged in intrenching itself in its position south of Utoy Creek. August 10, 11, and 12, no advances were made. August 13, it was decided to move all tmy of the Ohio, as well as the position which Lieutenant Twining had already selected south of Utoy Creek to be occupied by the Army of the Ohio upon the withdrawal of the Armies of the Tennessee and rries, while the former passing in rear of the Army of the Tennessee, bivouacked next night on Utoy Creek. Before the movement began its left had rested on the Decatur road. August 26, the moveme
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 16 (search)
bout the time the troops were stretched out on the road the attack upon our pickets became more serious, and General Kimball had to send two regiments, which had just gotten in position behind an old breast-work when the rebel skirmish line charged. They received a volley which dispersed them, and our rear came away without any further molestation. The day was exceedingly sultry, and the most trying upon the men of any during the campaign. The corps, however, made a good march, crossing Utoy Creek and taking position in line of battle, facing east, in the vicinity of Utoy Post-Office. On the 27th we moved by a road leading south and took position at Mount Gilead Church, forming line facing nearly south. The enemy's pickets were just in front — of us at this place. They fired a few shots from artillery at our pickets. On the 28th the corps moved to the vicinity of Red Oak, on the West Point railroad, following the Fourteenth Corps, the artillery and trains following a parallel ro
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 19 (search)
rebels shelling my lines from their works on the northwest side of Atlanta but injuring no one. While my pickets were preparing to withdraw, as the march was commenced that morning, the enemy charged them with a strong line of skirmishers, but they were handsomely repulsed and driven back with a loss to them of 4 killed and 2 captured, and with no loss to me; the lines were then withdrawn without further molestation from him. The command bivouacked that evening on the south side and near Utoy Creek. On the 27th the division was marched to Mount Gilead Church, near Camp Creek, and intrenched the position, in which it remained during the night. On the 28th the division marched to near the West Point and Atlanta Railroad at Red Oak Station, and took up a position, which was fortified. On the 29th, by your order, I sent the Second Brigade (Colonel Taylor) to destroy the railroad toward Atlanta, and three regiments under Colonel Bennett, of the Seventy-fifth Illinois, toward West Point
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
he Fifty-ninth Illinois into the Second Brigade. With frequent skirmishing and changes of lines and positions of regiments this brigade substantially remained at the same position in the siege of Atlanta from the morning of the 22d of July until the night of the 25th of August. We received orders and marched to the right, seven miles south across Proctor's Creek, and rested until daylight on the morning of August 26, when, starting at 8 a. m., we moved with corps seven miles south across Utoy Creek and camped for the night. August 27, marched four miles south with the corps to Camp Creek and camped. August 28, marched three miles southeast to Red Oak Station, on West Point railroad, striking this road twelve miles southwest of the Atlanta. August 29, lay still and fortified. August 30, marched to Shoal Creek, distance five miles. August 31, the Army of the Tennessee fighting to-day in front and on the west of Jonesborough, Ga. Our corps advanced east, met cavalry behind works o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
ime was usefully employed in adjusting lines, constructing new lines, in brisk skirmishes with the enemy, and in demonstrations. The position of the enemy became perfectly known to us, and was found to be impregnable to attack. August 25, evacuated our lines before Atlanta about midnight without annoyance from the enemy, this division bringing up the rear of the corps, and marched to Proctor's Creek. August 26, crossed Proctor's Creek, no enemy following but a thin skirmish line; crossed Utoy Creek and encamped, this division leading. August 27, left at 3 p. m., bringing up the rear of the corps and guarding the baggage train; passing the rest of the corps in camp, and crossed Camp Creek, covering the road to Fairburn. August 28, moved second in order of march, and took position near Red Oak, on the West Point railroad. August 29, remained in camp. August 30, marched first in order, and took position at Mann's house. Our march this day was much impeded by the Fourteenth Corps. Au
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
e march at 12 at night on the Buck Head road for some distance, then turned to the left, and at 4 o'clock night bivouacked near Proctor's Creek. 26th, the rebel skirmishers advanced toward us in early a. m. Took defensive position, my brigade on the left, General Bradley on my right. The enemy shelled my left, but did no harm. We soon moved toward the Sandtown road. Crossed Proctor's Creek rapidly, my brigade leading, and were soon in rear of the Twenty-third Corps. Bridged and crossed Utoy Creek, the banks of which were full from recent rains, and bivouacked in battle order some distance from the other brigades of the division and in a strong position. 27th, moved at about 3 p. m., my brigade in rear of the train. Got into a strong position after dark and put up works, General Wagner's brigade on my left and the Fifteenth Army Corps on my right. 28th, did not get thoroughly on the road till 4 p. m.; moved slowly on, the Fourteenth Army Corps leading; bivouacked after dark in tw
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
having frequent demonstrations on the lines. At midnight of August 25 the brigade marched out with sixty rounds of cartridges and three days rations, moving to the rear and right, being on the left of the corps. The Twenty-seventh Illinois went to the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. After a tedious night's march, we halted about daybreak for breakfast. Formed line of battle at 8 a. m. and commenced fortifying. Moved to the right soon after; marched eight miles and camped on Utoy Creek. August 27, marched at 2 p. m. as rear guard, made about five miles and crossed Camp Creek, going into position on right of General Wood's division; occupied two hills in advance of the line and fortified. Marched at 4 p. m. of 28th about four miles, and camped near Montgomery railroad. On the 29th advanced our lines about half a mile and fortified. August 30, marched at 6 a. m. and crossed the Montgomery railroad near Red Oak. Moved east about six miles and formed line of battle on
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 60 (search)
them with our own skirmishers. This carried our front line of riflepits to within 400 yards of the enemy's main line of works or forts. Our casualties from July 22 to August 25, inclusive, in front of Atlanta: Killed, 3; wounded, 21; missing, 1-supposed to be killed in one of the many advances on the enemy's works. (See schedule, marked A.) At 10 p. m. August 25 moved toward the extreme right of the army; marched all night. August 26, marched to the right and southwest, and camped near Utoy Creek. August 27, marched southward and west of Atlanta; built breast-works. 28th, marched eastward toward West Point railroad. 29th, remained inl camp. August 30. marched eastward across West Point railroad toward Rough and Ready; on Macon railroad. August 31, reached Macon railroad and built breast-works. September 1, detailed pioneers, who, with the pioneers of the brigade, under charge of Major Kidder, of the Eighty-ninth, tore up and destroyed two miles of the Macon railroad; marched sa
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