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The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death. 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 24: echo of Seven days, North and South. (search)
nstitution — for the flag, and for the Union! Whether they were so tightly blindfolded as not yet to see their error, is no question to be discussed here. No sooner had the howl gone up through the North, against the General who-spite of refused re-enforcements, jealousy and intrigue behind his back, and the terrible enemy before him-had saved his army, than the Government responded to it. Large numbers of men were sent from Harrison's Landing to Acquia Creek; the Federal forces at Warrentown, Alexandria and Fredericksburg were mobilized and strengthened; and the baton of command was wrenched from the hand of McClellan to be placed in that of Major-General John Pope! The history of this new popular hero, to this time, may be summed up by saying that he had been captain of Topographical Engineers; and that the books of that bureau showed he had prosecuted his labors with perhaps less economy than efficiency. Rapidly promoted for unknown reasons in the western armies, the
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley, Chapter 12: editor of the New Yorker. (search)
a man in any way for obnoxious opinions differ from the most glaring tyranny? In the New Yorker of July 16th, 1836, may be seen, at the head of a long list of recent marriages, the following interesting announcement: In Immanuel church, Warrentown, North Carolina, on Tuesday morning, 5th inst., by Rev. William Norwood, Mr. Horace Greeley, editor of the New Yorker, to Miss Y. Cheney, of Warrentown, formerly of this city. The lady was by profession a teacher, and to use the emphatic lanWarrentown, formerly of this city. The lady was by profession a teacher, and to use the emphatic language of one of her friends, crazy for knowledge. The acquaintance had been formed at the Graham House, and was continued by correspondence after Miss Cheney, in the pursuit of her vocation, had removed to North Carolina. Thither the lover hied; the two became one, and returned together to New York. They were married, as he said he would be, by the Episcopal form. Sumptuous was the attire of the bridegroom; a suit of fine black broadcloth, and on this occasion only, a pair of silk stockings
Hudson, they burned the bridges, wood piles, water tanks, ties, tore up the rails for miles, bent them, and destroyed the telegraph line. This was continued to Warrentown, where the work of destruction ceased. How many were concerned in this villainous work is not yet known, but there is no doubt but that it was a preconcerted angle party could have accomplished so much in one night. Three hundred of the villains are known to have been engaged in the destruction of the bridge track at Warrentown. [Second Dispatch.] Warrenton. Dec. 24, 1861--The damage to the North Missouri Railroad may be summed up as follows; Bridges at Sturgeon, Centralia, Mexico, Jeffstown, and Warrentown, burned; also one station and perhaps twenty cars, from fifty to sixty culverts, large and small; three or four water stations, 10,000 ties, from 200 to 300 telegraph poles, and five miles of iron destroyed, and ten miles of wire rendered useless. Two trains, one having eight car loads of hog