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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 36 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 18 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 10 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 10 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Waterloo, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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is time nearly his whole army on the Rappahannock, had abandoned the idea of forcing a passage of that river, in favor of an effort, by a long flank movement, to turn our right. To this end, Jackson was directed to take the advance, cross above Waterloo, and move around our army so as to strike the railroad in its rear; while Longstreet, following, was to menace our front and fix Pope's attention until Jackson's hazardous movement should be accomplished. Jackson moved rapidly across Aug. 25. the Rappahannock at Hinson's Mill, four miles above Waterloo, and encamped that night at Salem, behind the Bull Run Mountains, between Thoroughfare and Manassas Gaps. Starting early next morning, he passed through Thoroughfare Gap and moved south-easterly by Gainesville, where he was joined by Stuart with two cavalry brigades; striking before dark Aug. 26. the Alexandria Railroad at Bristow Station, thus placing himself directly between Pope's far superior force and his base at Alexandri
.; Maj. James Cavanagh, 69th N. Y.; and Maj. Carraher, 28th Mass. The London Times's correspondent, watching the battle from the heights, and writing front Lee's headquarters, says: To the Irish division, commanded by Gen. Meager, was principally committed the desperate task of bursting out of the town of Fredericksburg, and farming, under the withering fire of the Confederate batteries, to attack Marye's Heights, towering immediately in their front-Never at Fontenoy, Albuera, nor at Waterloo, was more undoubted courage displayed by the sons of Erin than during those six frantic dashes which they directed against the almost impregnable position of their foe. That any mortal men could have carried the position before which they were wantonly sacrificed, defended as it was, it seems to me idle for a moment to believe. But the bodies which he in dense masses within 40 yards of the muzzles of Col. Walton's guns are the best evidence what manner of men they were who pressed on to
him,and the enemy were held in check till evening, when Pleasanton withdrew across the river. Meade now, presuming the enemy in force at Culpepper Court House, pushed over Oct. 12. the 6th, 5th, and 2d corps to Brandy Station, while Buford's cavalry moved in the van to Culpepper Court House; when, on hearing from Gen. Gregg, commanding the cavalry division on our right, that the enemy had driven him back from Hazel run across the Rappahannock, and were crossing at Sulphur Springs and Waterloo in heavy force, Meade hastily drew back his army across the river and retreated Oct. 13. to Catlett's Station and thence Oct. 14. to Centerville; Gregg, with the 4th and 13th Pa. and 1st N. Y. . cavalry and 10th N. Y. infantry, being surrounded and attacked Oct. 12. near Jefferson, and routed, with a loss of 500, mainly prisoners. Our army was sharply and impudently pursued, especially by Stuart's cavalry, who gathered up quite a number of prisoners, mainly stragglers, of little