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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 1 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Forty, Fort (search)
Forty, Fort A protective work erected by the Connecticut settlers in Wyoming Valley, Pa., in 1769. It was the rendezvous of the Americans when the valley was invaded by Tories and Indians on June 3, 1778, and was surrendered on the following day. See Wyoming, massacre of.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pennymite and Yankee War. (search)
Pennymite and Yankee War. Trouble began in Wyoming Valley between Connecticut settlers under the auspices of the Susquehanna Company and the Pennsylvanians in 1769, when the former made a second attempt to clear the way for planting a colony in that region. In 1768 the proprietary of Pennsylvania purchased of the Six Nations the whole Wyoming Valley, and leased it for seven years to three Pennsylvanians, who built a fortified trading-house there. In February, 1769, forty pioneers of the Wyoming Valley, and leased it for seven years to three Pennsylvanians, who built a fortified trading-house there. In February, 1769, forty pioneers of the Susquehanna Company entered the Wyoming Valley and invested the block-house, garrisoned by ten men, who gave Governor Penn notice of the situation. Three of the Connecticut men were lured into the blockhouse under pretence of making an adjustment of difficulties, and were seized by the sheriff and taken to jail at Easton. Other immigrants flocked in from Connecticut, and the sheriff called upon the posse of the county to assist in their arrest. The Connecticut people also had built a block-
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
loring the Chickahominy, is attacked by Indians and captured; his companions killed......December, 1607 Condemned to death by Powhatan, he is saved by his daughter Pocahontas......December, 1607 Captain Newport returns with supplies and 120 immigrants......Jan. 8, 1608 Newport returns to England with a shipload of worthless earth, supposed to contain gold......April 10, 1608 Capt. John Smith explores the region of the Chesapeake Bay, nearly 3,000 square miles, as far north as Wyoming Valley......July 24, 1608 Newport arrives with supplies and about seventy immigrants, among them two women, the first in this colony......September, 1608 Smith returns to Jamestown......Sept. 7, 1608 He is made president of the council......Sept. 10, 1608 Smith compels the colonists to labor six hours each day......1608-9 New charter granted the London Company under the title of Adventurers and planters of the City of London, with ample privileges......May 23, 1609 Nine vess
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wyoming Valley, Civil War in the (search)
Wyoming Valley, Civil War in the At the close of the Revolution settlers from Connecticut began to pour into the Wyoming Valley, in Pennsylvania, under the auspices of the Susquehanna settlers (q. v.). Pennsylvania denied the claim of Connecticut to the valley, and asked Congress to appoint a commission to hear the claimants by representatives, and determine the questions in dispute. The commissioners, sitting at Trenton, decided against the claims of Connecticut. The settlers, who beliWyoming Valley, in Pennsylvania, under the auspices of the Susquehanna settlers (q. v.). Pennsylvania denied the claim of Connecticut to the valley, and asked Congress to appoint a commission to hear the claimants by representatives, and determine the questions in dispute. The commissioners, sitting at Trenton, decided against the claims of Connecticut. The settlers, who believed the decision covered only the question of jurisdiction, were content, but the authorities of Pennsylvania claimed a right to the soil, and would not confirm the land-titles of the inhabitants received from the Susquehanna Company. Not only so, but measures were taken to expel the Connecticut people from the valley. The most unjust and oppressive measures were employed by civil and military officers there. These the people endured for a while; but when, in July, 1784, two young men were
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wyoming Valley massacre. (search)
Wyoming Valley massacre. Among the Connecticut settlers in the Wyoming Valley were some Scotch and Dutch families from the Mohawk Valley. About thirty of them, suspected of being Tories, were arrested at the beginning of the war, and sent to Connecticut for trial. They were released for want of evidence, returned to the Mohawk, joined the Tory partisan corps of Johnson and Butler, and waited for a chance of vengeance on their persecutors. In June, 1778, a motley host of Tories and Indians, under the general command of Colonel Butler, gathered at Tioga, on the Susquehanna River. They entered the Wyoming Valley July 2. Among them were the vengeful Scotch and Dutch. Butler made his headquarters at the fortified house of Wintermoot, a Tory. Two full companies, out of 3,000 inhabitants, had been raised in the valley for the Continental army, and its only defenders were old men, brave women, tender youths, and a handful of trained soldiers. These, 400 in number, Col. Zebulon B