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Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 341 (search)
Chorus Leader Hold the frantic maiden, royal mistress, lest with nimble foot she rush to the Argive army. Hecuba You god of fire, it is yours to light the bridal torch for men, but piteous is the flame you kindle here, beyond my blackest expectation. Ah, my child! how little did I ever dream that such would be your marriage, a captive, and of Argos too! Give up the torch to me; you do not bear its blaze aright in your wild frantic course, nor have your afflictions left you in your sober senses, but still you are as frantic as before. Take in those torches, Trojan friends, and for her wedding madrigals weep your tears instead. Cassandra O mother, crown my head with victor's wreaths; rejoice in my royal match; lead me and if you find me unwilling at all, thrust me there by force; for if Loxias is indeed a prophet, Agamemnon, that famous king of the Achaeans, will find in me a bride more vexatious than Helen. For I will slay him and lay waste his home to avenge my father's and my
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 531 (search)
Chorus Then hastened all the race of Phrygia to the gates, to make the goddess a present of an Argive band ambushed in the polished mountain-pine, Dardania's ruin, a welcome gift to be to her, the virgin queen of deathless steeds; and with nooses of cord they dragged it, as it had been a ship's dark hull, to the stone-built temple of the goddess Pallas, and set it on that floor so soon to drink our country's blood. But, as they labored and made merry, came on the pitchy night; loud the Libyan flute was sounding, and Phrygian songs awoke, while maidens beat the ground with airy foot, uplifting their glad song; and in the halls a blaze of torchlight shed its flickering shadows on sleeping eyes.
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 945 (search)
Enough of this! For all that followed I must question myself, not you; what thought led me to follow the stranger from your house, traitress to my country and my home? Punish the goddess, show yourself more mighty even than Zeus, who, though he lords it over the other gods, is her slave; therefore I may well be pardoned. Still, from this you might draw a specious argument against me; when Paris died, and earth concealed his corpse, I should have left his house and sought the Argive fleet, since my marriage was no longer in the hands of gods. That was what I was eager to do; and the warders on the towers and watchmen on the walls can bear me witness, for often they found me seeking to let myself down stealthily by cords from the battlements [but tbere was that new husband, Deiphobus, that carried me off by force to be his wife against the will of Troy]. How then, my lord, could I be justly put to death . . . by you, with any show of right, seeing that he wedded me against my will,
Homer, Odyssey, Book 24, line 35 (search)
ound thee stood the daughters of the old man of the sea wailing piteously, and they clothed thee about with immortal raiment.And the Muses, nine in all, replying to one another with sweet voices, led the dirge. There couldst thou not have seen an Argive but was in tears, so deeply did the clear-toned Muse move their hearts. Thus for seventeen days alike by night and day did we bewail thee, immortal gods and mortal men,and on the eighteenth we gave thee to the fire, and many well-fatted sheep we famed Hephaestus. In this lie thy white bones, glorious Achilles, and mingled with them the bones of the dead Patroclus, son of Menoetius, but apart lie those of Antilochus, whom thou didst honor above all the rest of thy comrades after the dead Patroclus.And over them we heaped up a great and goodly tomb, we the mighty host of Argive spearmen, on a projecting headland by the broad Hellespont, that it might be seen from far over the sea both by men that now are and that shall be born hereafter.
Hyperides, Against Athenogenes, section 31 (search)
a man who made light of his duty to you would have cared about his obligations to me. He is so degraded and so true to type wherever he is, that even after his arrival at Troezen when they had made him a citizen he became the tool of Mnesias the ArgiveMnesias the Argive is mentioned as a traitor by Demosthenes. (See Dem. 18.295, where, however, the name is spelt *mnase/as.) and, after being made a magistrate by him, expelled the citizens from the city. The men themselves will bear witness to came the tool of Mnesias the ArgiveMnesias the Argive is mentioned as a traitor by Demosthenes. (See Dem. 18.295, where, however, the name is spelt *mnase/as.) and, after being made a magistrate by him, expelled the citizens from the city. The men themselves will bear witness to this; for they are here in exile.As these men were still in Athens, Alexander's decree of 424 B.C., providing that exiles should return, cannot yet have been issued. Hence we have a terminus ante quem for the
Isocrates, To Philip (ed. George Norlin), section 32 (search)
ou will review their conduct in relation to your ancestors; for you will find that each one of them is to be credited with great friendship and important services to your house: Argos is the land of your fathers,Perdiccas I., the founder of the Argive dynasty in Macedonia, was, according to Hdt. 8.137, a descendant of the Argive hero Temenus. See also Hdt. 5.22 and Grote, Hist. iii. p. 432. and is entitled to as much consideration at your hands as are your own ancestors; the Thebans honor thd of your fathers,Perdiccas I., the founder of the Argive dynasty in Macedonia, was, according to Hdt. 8.137, a descendant of the Argive hero Temenus. See also Hdt. 5.22 and Grote, Hist. iii. p. 432. and is entitled to as much consideration at your hands as are your own ancestors; the Thebans honor the founderHeracles. See General Introd. p. xli. of your race, both by processionals and by sacrifices,At the “Festival of Heracles.” Xen. Hell. 6.4.7; Dio. Sic. 15.53. beyond all the other go
Isocrates, Archidamus (ed. George Norlin), section 99 (search)
Remember the men who at DipaeaIn 471 B.C. See Hdt. 9.35, and Paus. 8.8.4. fought against the Arcadians, of whom we are told that, albeit they stood arrayed with but a single line of soldiery, they raised a trophy over thousands upon thousands; remember the three hundred who at ThyreaIn 542 B.C. See Hdt. 1.82, and Paus. 2.38.5. lsocrates confuses two contests, one earlier, where three hundred Argives fought against three hundred Spartans, one later, where both sides matched their full forces. defeated the whole Argive force in battle; remember the thousand who went to meet the foe at Thermopylae,
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 122 (search)
matricide and incest and begetting of children by sons with their own mothers; feasting of a father on the flesh of his own sons, plotted by those nearest of kin; exposure of infants by parents, and drownings and blindingsMost of these horrors are taken from the Argive legend of the house of Pelops and the Theban story of the house of Labdacus: from the former, Thyestes feasting unwittingly upon the flesh of his own sons, served up to him by his brother, Atreus; from the latter, Oedipus exposed as a child by his parents to perish in the mountains, the slaying of Laius, his father, by Oedipus, the marriage of Oedipus to his own mother, Jocasta, the death at each other's hands of the sons, Eteocles and Polyneices, who were born of that incestuous union, and the blinding of Oedipus. and other iniquities so many in number that no lack of material has ever been felt by those who are wont each year to present in the theatreThese stories furnished largely the themes of the tragic poets. the
Isocrates, Panathenaicus (ed. George Norlin), section 169 (search)
how in his desire to restore to power the son of Oedipus, his own son-in-law, he lost a great number of his Argive soldiers in the battle and saw all of his captains slain, though saving his own life in dishonor, and, when he failed to obtain a truce and was unable to recover the bodies of his dead for burial, he came as a suppliant to Athens, while Theseus still ruled the city, and implored the Athenians not to suffer such men to be deprived of sepulture nor to allow ancient custom and immemorial law to be set at naught—that ordinance which all men respect without fail, not as having been instituted by our human nature, but as having been enjoined by the divine power?See Isoc. 4.55, note
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 15 (search)
As you go to the portico which they call painted, because of its pictures, there is a bronze statue of Hermes of the Market-place, and near it a gate. On it is a trophy erected by the Athenians, who in a cavalry action overcame Pleistarchus, to whose command his brother Cassander had entrusted his cavalry and mercenaries. This portico contains, first, the Athenians arrayed against the Lacedaemonians at Oenoe in the Argive territory.Date unknown. What is depicted is not the crisis of the battle nor when the action had advanced as far as the display of deeds of valor, but the beginning of the fight when the combatants were about to close. On the middle wall are the Athenians and Theseus fighting with the Amazons. So, it seems, only the women did not lose through their defeats their reckless courage in the face of danger; Themiscyra was taken by Heracles, and afterwards the army which they dispatched to Athens was destroyed, but nevertheless they came to Troy to fight all the Greeks as w
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