hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 28 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 4 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 4 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 86 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
not amisse, briefly in particular to name both the Townes, Countreys & Islands, so neere as I could upon the sudden call them to remembrance: for the rest I doe referre the Reader to the histories, where more at large the same is to be seene. First, they did winne and conquere from the princes of Barbary the Island of Geisera & towne of Arzila, not past an 140. mile distant from their Metropolitane & chiefe city of Fesse: and after that they wonne also from the said princes the townes of Tanger , Ceuta , Mazigam, Azamor, and Azaffi, all alongst the Sea coasts. And in the yeere of our Lord, 1455. Alouis de Cadomosta a Gentleman Venetian, was hee that first discovered for their use Cape Verd, with the Islands adjoyning, of which he then peopled and planted those of Bonavista and Sant Iago discovering also the river Senega, otherwise called Niger , and Cape Roxo & Sierra Leone, and in a few yeeres after they did discover the coast of Guinea, and there peopled and built the castle of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The seventh Chapter sheweth that the planting there, is not a matter of such charge or difficultie, as many would make it seeme to be. (search)
not amisse, briefly in particular to name both the Townes, Countreys & Islands, so neere as I could upon the sudden call them to remembrance: for the rest I doe referre the Reader to the histories, where more at large the same is to be seene. First, they did winne and conquere from the princes of Barbary the Island of Geisera & towne of Arzila, not past an 140. mile distant from their Metropolitane & chiefe city of Fesse: and after that they wonne also from the said princes the townes of Tanger , Ceuta , Mazigam, Azamor, and Azaffi, all alongst the Sea coasts. And in the yeere of our Lord, 1455. Alouis de Cadomosta a Gentleman Venetian, was hee that first discovered for their use Cape Verd, with the Islands adjoyning, of which he then peopled and planted those of Bonavista and Sant Iago discovering also the river Senega, otherwise called Niger , and Cape Roxo & Sierra Leone, and in a few yeeres after they did discover the coast of Guinea, and there peopled and built the castle of
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, May, 1863. (search)
Inspector-general of Cavalry to Bragg's army. This afternoon I made his acquaintance, and I consider him one of the most extraordinary characters I ever met. Although he is a member of a well-known English family, he seems to have devoted his whole life to the exciting career of a soldier of fortune. He told me that in early life he had served three years in a French lancer regiment, and had risen from a private to be a sous-lieutenant. He after wards became a sort of consular agent at Tangier, under old Mr. Drummond Hay. Having acquired a perfect knowledge of Arabic, he entered the service of Abd-el-Kader, and under that renowned chief he fought the French for four years and a half. At another time of his life he fitted out a yacht, and carried on a private war with the Riff pirates. He was brigade-major in the Turkish contingent during the Crimean war, and had some employment in the Indian mutiny. He has also been engaged in war in Buenos Ayres and the South American republi
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States, June, 1863. (search)
ays number 10,000 men, but then there are generally only two or three divisions in a corps d'armee. At 5.30 P. M. the firing on Morris Island became distinctly audible. Captain Mitchell had evidently commenced his operations against Little Folly. While I was walking on the battery this evening, a gentleman came up to me and recalled himself to my recollection as Mr. Meyers of the Sumter, whom I had known at Gibraltar a year ago. This was one of the two persons who were arrested at Tangier by the acting United States consul in such an outrageous manner. He told me that he had been kept in iron during his whole voyage, in the merchant vessel, to the United States; and, in spite of the total illegality of his capture on neutral ground, he was imprisoned for four months in Fort Warren, and not released until regularly exchanged as a prisoner of war. Mr. Meyers was now most anxious to rejoin Captain Semmes, or some other rover. I understand that when the attack took place in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 12.91 (search)
allotted space with a guard over them. The prisoners of the first half-dozen prizes were put in irons, including the captains and mates, at which the captains were very indignant. Captain Semmes replied that he confined them in irons in retaliation for the manner in which the agents of the United States Government had treated the purser of the Confederate States steamer Sumter. The purser, under orders, was en route from Gibraltar to Cadiz in a French merchant steamer. Walking ashore at Tangier, in a neutral country, he was seized by the United States consul at the head of an armed force, and brutally imprisoned, with heavy manacles, and finally sent to New York in irons. The purser was a gentleman of unimpeachable character and high position. Again, there were occasions during the cruise when the number of prisoners warranted placing some in irons, but never were captains put in irons after that first measure of retaliation.--J. Mi. K, Our little ship was now showing signs o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 45: the cruise of the Sumter and the havoc she committed. (search)
e Sumter was like some young fellow entertained as a visitor, with two policemen watching the house ready to seize him when he came out. To make matters still more unpleasant for Commander Semmes, Paymaster Myers of the Sumter was arrested at Tangier on the opposite side of the Straits. Mr. Myers was on his way to Cadiz to negotiate for coal or money, and landed from the passenger steamer to walk about the town. The United States treaty with Morocco called for the surrender of all persons aign Government put a still more dubious aspect on the Sumter's case. There was a flaw in the Sumter somewhere, and this episode was the feather that broke the camel's back. We do not dwell with any satisfaction on the action of the consul at Tangier, who was doubtless prompted in his course by the instructions from the Department of State denouncing the Confederate cruisers as pirates. The paymaster of the Sumter was of little consequence one way or another, and whether he was a prisoner,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
The third son of Sir Robert Spottiswoode was XII.--Robert Spottiswoode, who, having studied medicine was appointed physician to the Governor and garrison at Tangiers. He went to that place with the Earl of Middleton, and died there in 1680. He was quite distinguished as a botanist, and in 1673 published a work entitled Plants within the fortifications of Tangiers. He left by his wife, Catherine, widow Elliott, only one son, XIII.--Major-General Alexander Spotswood, born at Tangiers, 1676. The Virginian historian, Charles Campbell, a descendant of Governor Spotswood, says: He was bred in the army from his childhood, served with distinction under Tangiers, 1676. The Virginian historian, Charles Campbell, a descendant of Governor Spotswood, says: He was bred in the army from his childhood, served with distinction under the Duke of Marlborough, and in 1710 was appointed Governor of Virginia. Being a master of the military art, he kept the malitia under excellent discipline. In 1716 he made the first complete discovery of a passage over the Blue Ridge mountains. He urged upon the British Government the policy of establishing a chain of posts be
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dongan, Thomas, 1634-1715 (search)
Dongan, Thomas, 1634-1715 Colonial governor; born in Castletown, county Kildare, Ireland, in 1634; a younger son of an Irish baronet; was a colonel in the royal army, and served under the French King. In 1678 he was appointed lieutenant-governor of Tangier, Africa, whence he was recalled in 1680. The relations between England and France were then delicate, and Dongan being a Roman Catholic, like the proprietor of New York, he was chosen by Duke James governor of that province (1683), as it was thought his experience in France might make it easier to keep up friendly relations with the French on the borders. Dongan caused a company of merchants in New York to be formed for the management of the fisheries at Pemaquid, a part of the duke's domain, and he took measures to protect the territory from encroachments. Dongan managed the relations between the English, French, and Indians with dexterity. He was not deceived by the false professions of the French rulers or the wiles of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spottswood, Sir Alexander 1676-1740 (search)
Spottswood, Sir Alexander 1676-1740 Colonial governor; born in Tangier, Africa, in 1676; served in the army under the Duke of Marlborough; was wounded in the battle of Blenheim; was governor of Virginia in 1710-23. In 1736 he was colonial postmaster, and in 1739 commander of the forces intended to operate against Florida. The French, in pursuance of their policy for spreading their dominions in America, had always concealed from the English all knowledge of the country beyond the Apalachian range of mountains. In 1714 Governor Spottswood resolved to acquire some knowledge of that mysterious region, and he went in person, with a few attendants, over those lofty ranges to the headwaters of the Tennessee and Kentucky rivers. He made the first certain discovery of a passage through those everlasting hills; but the country was very little known to Europeans until the middle of the eighteenth century. Spottswood was a zealous friend of the College of William and Mary and of effor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
83 Convention of International boundaryWashingtonNov. 12, 1884 Mexican Republic: Convention of Adjustment of claimsWashingtonApril 11, 1839 Treaty of Peace, friendship, limitsGuadalupe-HidalgoFeb. 2, 1848 Treaty of Boundary, etc.MexicoDec. 30, 1853 Morocco: Treaty of Peace and friendshipJan., 1787 Treaty of PeaceSept. 16, 1836 Convention of To maintain light-house at Cape Spartel. (Signed by U. S. Austria, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden´╝ëTangierMay 31, 1865 Convention of Protection (signed by 13 powers)MadridJuly 3, 1880 Muscat: Treaty of Amity and commerceMuscatSept. 21, 1833 Nassau: Convention of Abolishing droit d'aubaineBerlinMay 27, 1846 Netherlands: Treaty of Amity and commerceThe HagueOct. 8, 1782 Treaty of Commerce and navigationWashingtonJan. 19, 1839 Convention of CommercialWashingtonAug. 26, 1852 Convention of ConsularThe HagueJan. 22, 1855 Convention of ConsularWashingtonMay 23, 1878 Convention of Extraditio
1 2 3