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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 9 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 22 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 22 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 20 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Florence (Italy) or search for Florence (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 24 results in 17 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Americus Vespucius, 1451-1512 (search)
Americus Vespucius, 1451-1512 Navigator; born in Florence, March 9, 1451. When Columbus was in Seville preparing for his second voyage, Vespucius was there as a commercial agent of the Medici family of Florence, and he became personally acquainted with the discoverer. That acquaintance Americus Vespucius. inspired the Florentine with an ardent desire to make a voyage to the newly found continent, and he was gratified when, in 1499, he sailed from Spain with Alonzo de Ojeda as an adventuitle of this continent by fraud. Vespucius died in Seville, Feb. 22, 1512. His first voyage. He started from Cadiz on May 10, 1497, and returned to that city on Oct. 15, 1498. His letter to Pier Soderini, gonfalonier of the republic of Florence, is as follows: Magnificent Lord. After humble reverence and due commendations, etc. It may be that your Magnificence will be surprised by (this conjunction of) my rashness and your customary wisdom, in that I should so absurdly bestir mys
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Commissioners to foreign courts. (search)
y of alliance and commerce. Commissioners were also appointed to other European courts in 1777—Arthur Lee to that of Madrid; his brother William (lately one of the sheriffs of London) to Vienna and Berlin, and Ralph Izard, of South Carolina, to Florence. All but the French mission were failures. Arthur Lee was not allowed to enter Madrid, and went on a fruitless errand to Germany; Izard made no attempt to visit Florence, and William Lee visited Berlin without accomplishing anything. There hid; his brother William (lately one of the sheriffs of London) to Vienna and Berlin, and Ralph Izard, of South Carolina, to Florence. All but the French mission were failures. Arthur Lee was not allowed to enter Madrid, and went on a fruitless errand to Germany; Izard made no attempt to visit Florence, and William Lee visited Berlin without accomplishing anything. There his papers were stolen from him, through the contrivance, it was believed, of the British resident minister. See ambassado
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
er; the secular feud of pope and emperor scourged the land; province against province, city against city, street against street, waged remorseless war with each other from father to son, till Dante was able to fill his imaginary hell with the real demons of Italian history. So ferocious had the factions become that the great poet-exile himself, the glory of his native city and of his native language, was, by a decree of the municipality, condemned to be burned alive if found in the city of Florence. But these deadly feuds and hatreds yielded to political influences, as the hostile cities were grouped into states under stable governments; the lingering traditions of the ancient animosities gradually died away, and now Tuscan and Lombard, Sardinian and Neapolitan, as if to shame the degenerate sons of America, are joining in one cry for a united Italy. In France, not to go back to the civil wars of the League in the sixteenth century and of the Fronde in the seventeenth; not to spea
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), French, Daniel Chester 1850- (search)
French, Daniel Chester 1850- Sculptor; born in Exeter, N. H., April 20, 1850; educated in Boston, Mass., and in Florence, Italy; had a studio in Washington, D. C., in 1876-78, and then established himself in Florence. His bestknown works are The minute-man of Concord, in Concord, N. H.; a life-size statue of General Cass, in the Capitol in Washington; Dr. Gallaudet and his first deaf-mute pupil; the Millmore Memorial; the colossal Statue of the republic, at the World's Columbian ExpositioFlorence. His bestknown works are The minute-man of Concord, in Concord, N. H.; a life-size statue of General Cass, in the Capitol in Washington; Dr. Gallaudet and his first deaf-mute pupil; the Millmore Memorial; the colossal Statue of the republic, at the World's Columbian Exposition; and the Garfield Memorial, in Philadelphia, Pa. In April, 1901, he was chosen by the Lawton Monument Association, of Indianapolis, Ind., to make a memorial to Gen. Henry W. Lawton (q. v.), who was killed in the battle of San Mateo, Philippine Islands, Dec. 19, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Greenough, Horatio 1805-1852 (search)
Greenough, Horatio 1805-1852 Sculptor; born in Boston, Mass., Sept. 6, 1805; graduated at Harvard in 1825; evinced a taste and talent for the cultivation of art in Horatio Greenough. his early youth; and soon after his graduation he went to Italy, where he remained about a year. On his return to Boston in 1826 he modelled several busts, and then returned to Italy, making Florence his residence. Ever active, ever learning, and exceedingly industrious, he executed many pieces of sculpture of great merit. Among them was a group—The Chanting Cherubs—the first of the kind ever undertaken by an American sculptor. He made a colossal statue of Washington, half nude, in a sitting posture, for the Capitol at Washington, but it was so large that it could not be taken into the rotunda, its destined resting-place, and it occupies a position before the eastern front of the great building. He also executed a colossal group for the government—The rescue—which occupied the artist about e
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hildreth, Richard 1807-1865 (search)
1807-1865 Historian; born in Deerfield, Mass., June 22, 1807; graduated at Harvard College in 1829; studied and practised law and wrote for newspapers and magazines until 1832, when he began to edit the Boston Atlas. In the course of many years Mr. Hildreth wrote several books and pamphlets, chiefly on the subject of slavery, to which system he was opposed. He resided on a plantation in the South in 1834-35; in Washington, D. C., as correspondent of the Atlas, in 1837-38, when he resumed his editorial post on that paper; and resided in Demerara, British Guiana, from 1840 to 1843, when he edited, successively, two newspapers there. Mr. Hildreth's principal work was a History of the United States, in 6 volumes (1849-56). He was one of the editors of the New York Tribune for several years. In 1861 President Lincoln appointed him United States consul at Trieste, but failing health compelled him to resign the post. and he died in Florence, Italy, July 11, 1865. Richard Hildreth.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hoe, Richard March 1812-1833 (search)
ing-presses, his business increased, but, his health failing, in 1832 his eldest son, Richard, took charge of the business, with two partners. Meanwhile Richard had made material improvements in the manufacture of saws, and the production of these implements became an important part of their business. In 1837 Richard went to England to obtain a patent for an improved method of grinding saws. His observation of printing-presses in use there enabled him to make very great improvements in printing-machines. He patented his lightning press, so called Richard March Hoe. because of the rapidity of its motions, in 1847. For many years Richard carried on the manufacture of printing, hydraulic, and other presses, with his two brothers, Robert and Peter, the senior partner adding from time to time, by his inventive genius, great improvements, especially in the construction of power-presses, for rapid and excellent printing. Richard M. Hoe died suddenly in Florence, Italy, June 7, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Huntington, Daniel 1816- (search)
Huntington, Daniel 1816- Artist; born in New York, Oct. 14, 1816; was educated at Hamilton College. In 1835 he began studying art with Samuel F. B. Morse (q. v.), president of the National Academy of Design; in 1839 and 1844 visited Europe; and while in Rome and Florence produced several notable paintings. In 1862 and 1869 he was elected president of the National Academy, and served continuously in the same office in 1877-91. His paintings include The bar-room politician; A Toper asleep; portraits: Abraham Lincoln; Martin Van Buren; Daniel Huntington. Albert Gallatin, etc.; figure pieces: Mercy's dream; Sacred lesson; Mrs. Washington's reception; The good Samaritan; Righteousness and peace; The Atlantic cable projectors, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jarves, James Jackson 1820-1888 (search)
Jarves, James Jackson 1820-1888 Author; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 20, 1820; established the first newspaper printed in the Hawaiian Islands, in 1840. In 1850 he was appointed by King Kamehameha III. commissioner to the United States, Great Britain, and France, for the purpose of negotiating treaties, and in 1879 United States vice-consul in Florence, Italy. Among his works are History of Hawaii; Parisian sights and French principles seen through American spectacles; Italian sights, etc. He died in Terasp, Switzerland, June 28, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mazzei, Philip 1730-1816 (search)
ic funds—a contrivance invented for the purpose of corruption, and for assimilating us in all things to the rotten as well as the sound parts of the British model. It would give you a fever, he continued, were I to name to you the apostates who have gone over to these heresies—men who were Samsons in the field and Solomons in the council, but who have had their heads shorn by the harlot of England. This letter was dated April 24, 1796. Mazzei published an Italian translation of it in Florence, Jan. 1, 1797. Thence it was retranslated into French, and published in the Moniteur, Jan. 25. Translated a third time, into English, it made its way to the American newspapers, through the London press, in the beginning of May, and produced a most profound sensation in the United States. Jefferson first saw it on May 9, at Bladensburg, while on his way to Philadelphia to take his seat as president of the Senate, having been chosen Vice-President of the United States. The administration
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