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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 90 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 39 9 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 22 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 22 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 20 0 Browse Search
Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 12 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Florence (Italy) or search for Florence (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 5 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
ct I know of no building in Europe that surpasses it. As the twilight closed in, it was grand and impressive indeed; the lights at two or three altars, and the humble worshippers before them, adding not a little to its power. October 8.—Again I passed the morning in inquiries about the cholera and cordons, . . . . with the general conclusion which I came to at Turin, that Castel Franco, between Modena and Bologna, is the best place for us to undergo the quarantine, without which neither Florence nor Rome can be reached. The governor of Lombardy was very civil to me, and showed me all the documents relating to the subject, . . . . and from looking them over I have no doubt the cholera has nearly disappeared from every part of Italy. . . . . The Roman Consul—a great name for a very small personage —was also very good-natured, and showed me whatever I wanted to see. But neither of them gave me any hope that the cordons will be removed at present, and the governor talked of the Duke o<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
ve spoken out their opinions as freely and truly as these persons have spoken them out to me. This is a difference between the countries discreditable to us, and which I feel as a moral stain upon us. November 7.—I spent some time this morning in the King's private library, originally Bonaparte's, and which I knew under Barbier as the library of Louis XVIII. It is an uncommonly comfortable and well-arranged establishment; better than any of the sort I know of, except the Grand Duke's at Florence, and larger than that. Jouy, the author of the Hermite de la Chaussee d'antin, is the head of it, a hale, hearty, white-headed old gentleman of about sixty-five. Like everybody else, now, he talked about politics and the elections, and rejoiced at the success of the Ministry. He seemed to be throughout very content, and has occasion to be so. He made a good fortune by his periodicals, and admits very frankly that he wrote for that purpose; wrote as long as the booksellers would pay him w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
he fougue de ses passions. He left it again as soon as he obtained diplomatic employment, because he much prefers the business of the state to anything else, and holds it to be a duty higher and more honorable. He liked his place as Minister at Florence very much, and he likes his occupations as Deputy. In the summer, when in the country, he still writes poetry, and has finished this year a poem of some length; but he makes everything of the sort to yield to public affairs. Indeed, he says hebout me. He is a short man, wearing spectacles, a little gray-headed, though hardly above forty years old, and with a very natural and earnest, but somewhat nervous manner. He talked to me for half an hour, wholly about his projected history of Florence to the time of Cosmo dea Medici, and talked with great spirit and knowledge. He intends it as a development of the character of the Middle Ages, and means to divide it into four parts, viz. Political History, History of the Laws and Constitutio
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
ot on any of our lists, as I may find cheap and tempting, and to establish agencies in Leipzig, Florence, and perhaps elsewhere; beginning the purchases, and putting the agents in communication with M his more private correspondence also suffered in consequence of his constant occupation. In Florence he established an agency in the autumn, and attended again to its affairs in the spring. He determined, after some preliminary correspondence with an old acquaintance in Florence, Mr. Sloane, to go to the Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, whom Humboldt at Berlin had described tolector for the Library at home. He says: The best places I have yet found for buying books are Florence and Rome. The books that have been thus far bought by me in Brussels, Berlin, and Rome, or under my directions in Leipzig and Florence, have been bought at above forty per cent under the fair, regular prices. To this should be added the fact, that on Mr. Ticknor's purchases the Library was s
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
Chapter 17: Italy. winter in Rome. Florence, Turin, Paris. letters to Mr. Prescott, Count Circourt, and Mr. Greenough. topped there. And then such a journey as we had for seven days to Florence; not a cloud in the sky, so to speak; no wind, no heat, no cold, nadies could see everything they wanted to see, and drove down into Florence on the 2d of November through hedge-rows of myrtle and roses. Themore interested in him, I suppose, than you are in anybody else in Florence. He told me that the first hundred pages of your Ferdinand and Ispassed an evening with the Grand Duke, who, soon after we reached Florence, went off to the marriage of his eldest son with a very charming Soth domestic and foreign, I do not believe. To W. H. Prescott. Florence, May 8, 1857. my dear William,—I have to thank you for two mostom which we turned our faces with great regret,—and a fortnight in Florence, where I did a good deal of work for the Library, and then came on