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Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz), Book 1, Addressed partially to Cynthia, partially to third party (search)
Addressed partially to Cynthia, partially to third party ARIADNEfrom Knossos in Crete, daughter of King Minos, she gave Theseus the ball of twine whereby he could escape the labyrinth, after killing the Minotaur. Theseus took her with him, but left her on the island of Naxos as she slept. (Cf. Strauss' opera). She was transported to Olympos by Bacchus. ANDROMEDAdaughter of King Cepheus and Cassiopeia of Ethiopia, was chained to a rock by the sea to be eaten by a sea monster; rescued by Perseus. EDONIANa Thracian tribe that worshipped Bacchus. APIDANUSriver in Thessaly. LIBERsame as Bacchus, Dionysus, god of wine and revelry. ARGUShundred-eyed creature commanded by Juno to guard Io, Inachus' daughter, after Jupiter had an affair with her. Juno had been sleeping; Jupiter went down to earth, placed a cloud overhead, and began having sex with Io. Juno awoke, saw the suspicious cloud and zoomed down, whisking the cloud aside. Jupiter, seeing the cloud gone, quickly changes
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz), Book 1, Addressed to Tullus, nephew of Lucius Volcacius Tullus, consul 33 and proconsul of Asia 30-29 (search)
Addressed to Tullus, nephew of Lucius Volcacius Tullus, consul 33 and proconsul of Asia 30-29 See poems 1, 14, and 22. RHIPAEAN MOUNTAINSa mythical range to the far north. MEMNONking of Ethiopia. PACTOLUSa river in Lydia formerly rich in gold. Really, I'm not afraid of exploring the Adriatic with you, Tullus, or to set sail on the Aegean. We could climb the Rhipaean mountains together! and go even further, to the land of Memnon, but the words and embraces of my girl make me linger, her earnest prayers and rapidly changing color. She pierces every night like a flame, complaining she is abandoned, no gods exist. She is already denying she is mine, making threats like a spurned girlfriend to a graceless man. I can't endure a single hour of these complaints! To hell with him who can be flippant in the face of love! Is it worth so much to me to know Athens' sophistications, to see the ancient splendors of Asia, when Cynthia launches such invective toward my ship and disfigures her f
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK VIII, CHAPTER II: RAINWATER (search)
ltica, the Rhine; on this side of the Alps, the Timavo and Po; in Italy, the Tiber; in Maurusia, which we call Mauretania, the Dyris, rising in the Atlas range and running westerly to Lake Heptagonus, where it changes its name and is called Agger; then from Lake Heptabolus it runs at the base of barren mountains, flowing southerly and emptying into the marsh called Here there is something lost, as also in chapter III, sections 5 and 6 . . . It surrounds Meroƫ, which is a kingdom in southern Ethiopia, and from the marsh grounds there, winding round by the rivers Astansoba and Astoboa and a great many others, it passes through the mountains to the Cataract, and from there it dashes down, and passes to the north between Elephantis and Syene and the plains of Thebes into Egypt, where it is called the Nile. 7. That the source of the Nile is in Mauretania is known principally from the fact that there are other springs on the other side of the Atlas range flowing into the ocean to the west,
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK VIII, CHAPTER III: VARIOUS PROPERTIES OF DIFFERENT WATERS (search)
t there are marshy lakes which are so salt that they have a crust of salt on the surface. In many other places there are springs and rivers and lakes which are necessarily rendered salt because they run through salt pits. 8. Others flow through such greasy veins of soil that they are overspread with oil when they burst out as springs: for example, at Soli, a town in Cilicia, the river named Liparis, in which swimmers or bathers get anointed merely by the water. Likewise there is a lake in Ethiopia which anoints people who swim in it, and one in India which emits a great quantity of oil when the sky is clear. At Carthage is a spring that has oil swimming on its surface and smelling like sawdust from citrus wood, with which oil sheep are anointed. In Zacynthus and about Dyrrachium and Apollonia are springs which discharge a great quantity of pitch with their water. In Babylon, a lake of very great extent, called Lake Asphaltitis, has liquid asphalt swimming on its surface, with which a
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 52 (search)
In the number of his mistresses were also some queens; such as Eunoe, a Moor, the wife of Bogudes, to whom and her husband he made, as Naso reports, many large presents. But his greatest favourite was Cleopatra, with whom he often revelled all night until the dawn of day, and would have gone with her through Egypt in dalliance, as far as Ethiopia, in her luxurious yacht, had not the army refused to follow him. He afterwards invited her to Rome, whence he sent her back loaded with honours and presents, and gave her permission to call by his name a son, who, according to the testimony of some Greek historians, resembled Caesar both in person and gait. Mark Antony declared in the senate, that Caesar had acknowledged the child as his own; and that Caius Matias, Caius Oppius, and the rest of Caesar's friends knew it to be true. On which occasion Oppius, as if it had been an imputation which he was called upon to refute, published a book to shew, "that the child which Cleopatra fathered upo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
aire castle, but not strong, for that it may be battered on every side, but very rich & large, compassed about with faire gardens into the which they conveigh water for their necessitie out of Nilus, with certaine wheeles & other like engines. This magnificent citie is adorned with very fruitfull gardens both pleasant and commodious, with great plenty of pondes to water the same. Notwithstanding the great pleasures of Cairo are in the moneth of August, when by meanes of the great raine in Ethiopia the river Nilus overfloweth and watereth all the countrey, and then they open the mouth of a great ditch, which extendeth into the river, and passeth through the midst of the citie, and entring there are innumerable barkes rowing too and fro laden with gallant girles and beautifull dames, which with singing, eating, drinking and feasting, take their solace. The women of this country are most beautifull, and goe in rich attire bedecked with gold, pretious stones, and jewels of great value
aire castle, but not strong, for that it may be battered on every side, but very rich & large, compassed about with faire gardens into the which they conveigh water for their necessitie out of Nilus, with certaine wheeles & other like engines. This magnificent citie is adorned with very fruitfull gardens both pleasant and commodious, with great plenty of pondes to water the same. Notwithstanding the great pleasures of Cairo are in the moneth of August, when by meanes of the great raine in Ethiopia the river Nilus overfloweth and watereth all the countrey, and then they open the mouth of a great ditch, which extendeth into the river, and passeth through the midst of the citie, and entring there are innumerable barkes rowing too and fro laden with gallant girles and beautifull dames, which with singing, eating, drinking and feasting, take their solace. The women of this country are most beautifull, and goe in rich attire bedecked with gold, pretious stones, and jewels of great value
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
m which congeleth in certaine canes, whereof I found many in Pegu , when I made my house there, because that (as I have said before) they make their houses there of woven canes like to mats. From Chaul they trade alongst the coast of Melinde in Ethiopia , within the land of Cafraria: on that coast are many good harbors kept by the Moores. Thither the Portugals bring a kinde of Bombast cloth of a low price, and great store of Paternosters or beads made of paltrie glasse, which they make in Chaulevish people, and have dealt so of a long time: and by this trade the Portugals change their commodities into gold, and cary it to the Castle of Mozambique, which is in an Island not farre distant from the firme land of Cafraria on the coast of Ethiopia , and is distant from India 2800. miles. Now to returne to my voyage, when I came to Ormus, I found there Master Francis Berettin of Venice, and we fraighted a bark together to goe for Basora for 70. duckets, and with us there went other Marchan
m which congeleth in certaine canes, whereof I found many in Pegu , when I made my house there, because that (as I have said before) they make their houses there of woven canes like to mats. From Chaul they trade alongst the coast of Melinde in Ethiopia , within the land of Cafraria: on that coast are many good harbors kept by the Moores. Thither the Portugals bring a kinde of Bombast cloth of a low price, and great store of Paternosters or beads made of paltrie glasse, which they make in Chaulevish people, and have dealt so of a long time: and by this trade the Portugals change their commodities into gold, and cary it to the Castle of Mozambique, which is in an Island not farre distant from the firme land of Cafraria on the coast of Ethiopia , and is distant from India 2800. miles. Now to returne to my voyage, when I came to Ormus, I found there Master Francis Berettin of Venice, and we fraighted a bark together to goe for Basora for 70. duckets, and with us there went other Marchan
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voiage made out of England unto Guinea and Benin in Affrike, at the charges of certaine marchants Adventurers of the Citie of London, in the yeere of our Lord 1553. (search)
sea of sand, called Mare de Sabione, a very dangerous sea lying between ye great citie of Alcair, or Cairo in Aegypt, and the country of Aethiopia: In the which way are many unhabitable deserts, continuing for the space of five dayes journey. And they affirme, that if the sayd Christian Emperor were not hindered by those deserts (in the which is great lacke of victuals, & especially of water) he would or now have invaded the kingdom of Egypt , and the citie of Alcair. The chiefe city of Ethiopia , where this great emperor is resident, is called Amacaiz, being a faire citie, whose inhabitants are of the colour of an Olive. There are also many other cities, as the city of Sava upon the river of Nilus, where the Emperour is accustomed to remaine in the Sommer season. There is likewise a great city named Barbaregaf, and Ascon, from whence it is said that the Queene of Saba came to Hierusalem to heare the wisedom of Salomon. This citie is but litle, yet very faire, and one of the chief
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