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Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Fragments of Book 10, Chapter 14 (search)
m much the more cruel and arrogant. Cambyses the Persian, after he had taken Memphis and Pelusium,525 B.C. since he could not bear his good fortune as men should, dug up the tomb of Amasis, the former king of Egypt. And finding his mummified corpse in the coffin, he outraged the body of the dead man, and after showing every despite to the senseless corpse, he finally ordered it to be burned. For since it was not the practice of the natives to consign the bodies of their dead to fire, he supposed that in this fashion also he would be giving offence to him who had been long dead. When Cambyses was on the point of setting out upon his campaign against Ethiopia, he dispatched a part of his army against the inhabitants of Ammonium,The site of the oracle of Ammon, the present oasis of Siwah. giving orders to its commanders to plunder and burn the oracle and to make slaves of all who dwelt near the shrine.Const. Exc. 2 (1), pp. 224-225.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 7 (search)
century B.C., by Battus, otherwise called Aristotle, a Greek from the island of Thera, and attained great reputation as a centre of trade, and as the birthplace of Eratosthenes, Aristippus, and Callimachus. oraclum Iovis: the Egyptian deity Ammon, or Hammon, originally worshipped in Thebes under the form of a ram, or of a human figure with a ram's horns, had his most famous temple and oracle in the oasis of Siwah in the Libyan desert, 400 miles from Cyrene (Plin. l.c.). He was identified by the Greeks and Romans with Zeus and Jupiter; cf. Prop. 4.1.103 hoc neque harenosum Libyae Iovis explicat antrum. aestuosi: of glowing heat, as in Catul. 46.5 Nicaeae aestuosae; cf. Hor. Carm. 1.22.5 per Syrtes aestuosas ; Hor. Carm. 1.31.5 aes