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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 14 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 18 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 12 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 8 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 6 0 Browse Search
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Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., III: a word more about America. (search)
which I am speaking. The business of these districts would be more advantageously done in assemblies of the kind; they would form a useful school for the increasing number of aspirants to public life, and the House of Commons would be relieved. The strain in Ireland would be relieved too, and by natural and safe means. Irishmen are to be found, who, in desperation at the present state of their country, cry out for making Ire. land independent and separate, with a national Parliament in Dublin, with her own foreign office and diplomacy, her own army and navy, her own tariff, coinage, and currency. This is manifestly impracticable. But here again let us look at what is done by people who in politics think straight and see clear; let us observe what is done in the United States. The Government at Washington reserves matters of imperial concern, matters such as those just enumerated, which cannot be relinquished without relinquishing the unity of the empire. Neither does it allow
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
cury and the York-shire Post in the north of England, like the Scotsman and the Glasgow Herald in Scotland. The Americans used to say to me that what they valued was news, and that this their newspapers gave them. I at last made the reply: Yes, news for the servants' hall! I remember that a New York newspaper, one of the first I saw after landing in the country, had a long account, with the prominence we should give to the illness of the German Emperor or the arrest of the Lord Mayor of Dublin, of a young woman who had married a man who was a bag of bones, as we say, and who used to exhibit himself as a skeleton; of her growing horror in living with this man, and finally of her death. All this in the most minute detail, and described with all the writer's powers of rhetoric. This has always remained by me as a specimen of what the Americans call news. You must have lived amongst their newspapers to know what they are. If I relate some of my own experiences, it is because thes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agassiz, Louis John Rudolph, 1807-1873 (search)
ssor Agassiz settled in Cambridge, and was made Professor of Zoology and Geology of the Lawrence Scientific School at its foundation in 1848. That year he made. with some of his pupils, a scientific exploration of the shores of Lake Superior. He afterwards explored the southern coasts of the United States, of Brazil, and the waters of the Pacific Ocean. An account of his explorations on the Brazilian coast was given in A journey to Brazil, by Mrs. Agassiz, in 1867. He received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London; from the Aeademy of Sciences of Paris, the Monthyon Prize and the Cuvier Prize; the Wollaston Medal from the Geological Society of London; and the Medal of Merit from the King of Prussia. He was a member of many scientific societies, and the universities of Dublin and Ediniburgh conferred on him the honorary degree of Ll.D. Professor Agassiz published valuable scientific works in Europe and in the United States. He died in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 14, 1873.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barre, Isaac, 1726-1802 (search)
Barre, Isaac, 1726-1802 Military officer; born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1726. His parents Isaac Barre. were French, his father being a small tradesman in Dublin. Isaac entered the British army at the age of twenty-one, and participated in the expedition against Louisburg in 1758. Wolfe was his friend, and appointed him major of brigade; and in May, 1759, he was made adjutant-general of Wolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, byDublin. Isaac entered the British army at the age of twenty-one, and participated in the expedition against Louisburg in 1758. Wolfe was his friend, and appointed him major of brigade; and in May, 1759, he was made adjutant-general of Wolfe's army that assailed Quebec. He was severely wounded in the battle on the Plains of Abraham, by which he lost the sight of one eye. Barre served under Amherst in 1760; and was the official bearer of the news of the surrender of Montreal to England. In 1761 he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel, and the same year he obtained a seat in Parliament, where he found himself in opposition to the ministry. For this offence he was deprived of his offices, given him as a reward for his services in America. He was the warm friend of the colonies, and made able speeches in Parliament in their favo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 (search)
Berkeley, George, 1684-1753 Bishop of Cloyne; born in Kilcrin, Kilkenny, Ireland, March 12, 1684; was educated at Trinity College, Dublin; became a Fellow there; and at an early age wrote on scientific subjects. Between 1710 and 1713 his two famous works appeared, in which he denies the existence of matter, and argues that it is not without the mind, but within it, and that that which is called matter is only an impression produced by divine power on the mind by the invariable laws of nature. On a tour in France he visited the French philosopher Malebranche, who became so excited by a discussion with Berkeley on the non-existence of matter that, being ill at the time, he died a few days afterwards. Miss Vanhomrigh (Swift's Vanessa ) bequeathed to Berkeley $20,000: and in 1728 his income was increased $5,500 a year by being made Dean of Derry. Berkeley conceived a plan for establishing a college in the Bermudas for the instruction of pastors for the colonial churches and missiona
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 (search)
Burke, Edmund, 1730-1797 Statesman; born in Dublin, June 1, 1730; was one of fifteen children of Richard Burke, an attorney, and was descended from the Norman De Burghs, who early settled in Ireland; graduated at Trinity College, Dublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an aDublin (1748); studied law, and in 1756 published his famous essay on The sublime and beautiful. In 1758-59 he and Dodsley established the Annual Registor; and in 1765 he was made secretary to Premier Rockingham. He entered Parliament in 1766. There he took an active and brilliant part in debates on the American question, and always in favor of the Americans. advocating their cause with rare eloquence. In 1771 he was appointed agent for the colony of New York. He lost some popularity by advocating the claims of the Roman Catholics in 1780, and opposing the policy of repressing the trade of Ireland. During the brief administration of the Rockingham ministry in 1782, he was a member of the privy council and paymaster of the forces. Taking a prominen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carey, Matthew 1760-1839 (search)
Carey, Matthew 1760-1839 Publicist; born in Dublin, Ireland, Jan. 28, 1760; learned the business of printer and bookseller, and at the age of seventeen wrote and published a pamphlet on duelling. This was soon followed by an address to the Roman Catholics in Ireland on their oppressions by the penal code. This was so seditious and inflammatory that he was compelled to fly to Paris, but returned to Ireland in the course of a year, where, in 1783, he edited the Freeman's journal, and established the Volunteer's journal. Because of a violent attack on Parliament, he was confined in Newgate Prison; and after his release he sailed for the United States, arriving in Philadelphia, Nov. 15, 1784. There he started the Pennsylvania Herald, the first newspaper in the country that gave accurate reports of legislative proceedings. He was always aggressive with his pen. He fought a duel with Colonel Oswald, editor of a rival newspaper. He married in 1791, and began business as a booksell
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
family and in a most meagre manner to eke out existence upon the present allowance. So, too, in Europe, in such places as Liege, and Copenhagen, and Nice, and many others where the salary is $1,500 and the unofficial work yields hardly any return. These are only a few of the most glaring cases, but the position of a man without property of his own sufficient to make him practically independent of his salary so far as subsistence is concerned, who goes, for instance, to Trieste, Cologne, Dublin, or Leeds, or to Sydney, New South Wales, or to Guatemala, or Managua, or to Tamatave, Madagascar, or to Odessa, or Manila, or Beirut, or Jerusalem, on a salary of $2,000 is relatively little better off. Nor is the position of a consul at Buenos Ayres, or at Brussels, or at Marseilles, Hamburg, Sheffield, Nuevo Laredo, Athens, Ningpo, or Victoria, B. C., with a salary of $2,500 to be envied, with the necessary demands which he is obliged to meet. It is of course notorious that there are m
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Croghan, George 1746-1782 (search)
Croghan, George 1746-1782 Indian agent; born in Ireland; was educated in Dublin; emigrated to Pennsylvania; and in 1746 was engaged in trade with the Indians. Acquiring their language and friendship, Pennsylvania made him Indian agent. Captain in Braddock's expedition in 1755, he showed such excellence in military matters that in 1756 he was intrusted with the defence of the western frontier of Pennsylvania, and was made by Sir William Johnson his deputy, who, in 1763, sent him to England to confer with the ministry about an Indian boundary-line. On that voyage he was wrecked on the coast of France. In May, 1776, Croghan founded a settlement 4 miles above Fort Pitt (now Pittsburg). He was active in securing the attachment of the Indians to the British interest until 1776, but took no active part in the events of the Revolution. He died in Passayunk, Pa., in August, 1782. Military officer; born near Louisville, Ky., Nov. 15, 1791; educated at the College of William an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cunningham, William 1774- (search)
Cunningham, William 1774- Provost-marshal; born in Dublin, Ireland; landed in New York in 1774; became provost-marshal there; and in 1778 had charge of the prisoners there and in Philadelphia. Of the prisoners under his care nearly 2,000 were starved to death (whose rations he sold), and more than 250 were privately hanged, without trial, to gratify his brutal appetite. He was executed in England for forgery, Aug. 10, 1791.
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