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t foure of the clocke in the evening. This bay of Sant Iago standeth in nineteene degrees and eighteene minuts to the Northward of the lyne. The 3 of September wee arrived in a little bay a league to the Westwarde off Port de Natividad called Malacca , which is a very good place to ride in: and the same day about twelve of the clocke our Generall landed with thirtie men or there about, and went up to a towne of Indians which was two leagues from the road, which towne is called Acatlan: there were in it about 20 or 30 houses and a Church, which we defaced and came abourd againe the same night. All the people were fled out of the towne at the sight of us. The fourth of September, wee departed from the roade of Malacca , and sayled along the coast. The 8 we came to the roade of Chaccalla, in which bay there are two litle houses by the waters side. This bay is 18 leagues from the Cape de los Corrientes. The 9 in the morning our Generall sent up Captaine Havers with fortie me
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The admirable and prosperous voyage of the Worshipfull Master Thomas Candish of Trimley in the Countie of Suffolke Esquire, into the South sea, and from thence round about the circumference of the whole earth, begun in the yeere of our Lord 1586, and finished 1588. Written by Master Francis Pretty lately of Ey in Suffolke, a Gentleman employed in the same action. (search)
t foure of the clocke in the evening. This bay of Sant Iago standeth in nineteene degrees and eighteene minuts to the Northward of the lyne. The 3 of September wee arrived in a little bay a league to the Westwarde off Port de Natividad called Malacca , which is a very good place to ride in: and the same day about twelve of the clocke our Generall landed with thirtie men or there about, and went up to a towne of Indians which was two leagues from the road, which towne is called Acatlan: there were in it about 20 or 30 houses and a Church, which we defaced and came abourd againe the same night. All the people were fled out of the towne at the sight of us. The fourth of September, wee departed from the roade of Malacca , and sayled along the coast. The 8 we came to the roade of Chaccalla, in which bay there are two litle houses by the waters side. This bay is 18 leagues from the Cape de los Corrientes. The 9 in the morning our Generall sent up Captaine Havers with fortie me
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ities might call him to an account for burning a vessel under the British flag, so he called the unlucky shipmaster into his cabin and extorted from him a confession that he had resorted to a stratagemn to save his ship in case lie should fall in with the Alabama. Notwithstanding the uncomplimentary manner in which Captain Semmes had treated the flag which has braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze, when tile Alabama arrived at her next port and anchored off the little town of Malacca, the English officers and inhabitants went wild over her. After leaving this place, Semmes fell in with an English vessel, the master of which gave him such information as enabled him to capture two large American ships in that vicinity. the Sonora, of Newburyport, and the Highlander. of Boston. When the Master of The Alabama off Capetown. From a sketch by Rear-Admiral Walke. the Sonora came on board the Alabama, he said pleasantly to Captain Semmes: I have been expecting you for the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
rer of the territory north of Mexico, now New Mexico, Arizona, and Colorado......1540-42 Frobisher, Sir Martin, born in England in 1536; died in Plymouth, England, Nov. 7, 1594; discovers Frobisher's Strait......July 21, 1576 Drake, Sir Francis, born in England in 1537 (?); died in Puerto Bello, Dec. 27, 1595; explores the coast of California in 1578-79; first Englishman to sail around the globe, reaching England......1580 Davis, John, born in England in 1550; died on the coast of Malacca in 1605; discoverer of Davis's Strait in 1585; of the Falkland Islands......1592 Hudson, Henry, born in England; discoverer and explorer of the Hudson River in the interests of the Dutch, September, 1609, and Hudson Bay in 1611. Sent adrift in an open boat by his crew and never heard of afterwards......1611 under the Continental Congress For previous history see each State separately. Pursuant to arrangements made by committees appointed in the colonies to confer regarding the
lash two deep sea leads together, each weighing forty-five pounds, to keep our drift-lead on the bottom. Here was another of those elliptical currents spoken of a few pages back. If the reader will look at a map of the China Sea, he will observe that the north-east monsoon, as it comes sweeping down that sea, in the winter months, blows parallel with the coasts of China and Cochin China. This wind drives a current before it to the south-west. This current, as it strikes the peninsula of Malacca, is deflected to the eastward toward the coast of Sumatra. Impinging upon this coast, it is again deflected and driven off in the direction of the island of Borneo. This island in turn gives it a northern direction, and the consequence is, that the south-westerly current which came sweeping down the western side of the China Sea, is now going up on the eastern side of the same sea, as a north-easterly current. We lay five days at our kedge, during a calm that lasted all that time. The m
pends a night the Chinese in possession of all the business of the place Alabama leaves Singapore capture of the Martaban, Alias Texan Star Alabama touches at Malacca capture of the Highlander and Sonora Alabama once more in the Indian Ocean. It turned out as I had conjectured in the last chapter. The Wyoming had been at ng recorded the court adjourned. At a late hour in the night, the moon shining quite brightly, we ran in past some islands, and anchored off the little town of Malacca—formerly a Portuguese settlement, but now, like Singapore, in the possession of the English. My object was to land my prisoners, and at early dawn we dispatched They left us after a short visit, and at half-past 9 A. M., our boats having returned, we were again under steam. Bartelli was seen lugging a basketfull of fine Malacca oranges into the cabin, soon after the return of our boats—a gift from some of our lady friends who had visited us. I have observed by Mr. Seward's little bil
from Cornwall 1100 B. C., before the building of Solomon's Temple. See brass. Tarshish was thy merchant [Tyre]; with silver, iron, tin, and lead they traded in thy fairs. The tin of Cornwall, and also probably that from the peninsula of Malacca, was mixed with the copper of the Wady Maghara to form the Egyptian, Phoenician, and Assyrian bronzes. Dr. Wilson (Prehistoric Man) supposes that tin was first brought to the Mediterranean from Malacca, and gave a new impetus to early Eastern cMalacca, and gave a new impetus to early Eastern civilization. Britain was the next source. Chili and Mexico are more lately known as productive sources of the same useful metal. The ordinary Assyrian bronze is composed of copper 10, tin 1. Their bell-metal was, copper 86, tin 14. The ancient bronze cutting-tools contained from 4 to 15 per cent of tin, from which it is gathered that the secret of their manufacture is rather in their mode of working and tempering than in their com- position. This appears to be also the case with Chin
, freed from various appendages, assorted into sizes, and seasoned. Many different processes are required to finish even the cheapest cane. The bark is to be removed after boiling the stick in water, or to be polished after roasting it in ashes; exerescences are to be manipulated into points of beauty; handles straightened and shanks shaped; forms twisted and heads rasped; tops carved or mounted, surfaces charred and scraped, shanks smoothed or varnished, and bottoms shaped and ferruled. Malacca canes have frequently to be colored in parts, so that stained and natural surfaces are not distinguishable; ivory for handles is turned or carved into shape; horns and hoofs for handles are baked, to retain their forms; tortoise-shell raspings are conglomerated by pressure into ornamental shapes, and lithographic transfers are extensively used upon walking-sticks for the Parisian market. The Egyptian gentleman did not consider himself fixed without a walking-cane. He affected a certain
he Baltic. It should also be mentioned here that this map of Eratosthenes was merely a plane exemplification, and that he was fully aware of the spherical form of the earth. Aristotle had said, 100 years before, that it was possible that Spain and India were only separated by the sea. Eratosthenes said that only the extent of the Atlantic Ocean prevented sailing from Spain to India along the same parallel. In the map of Ptolemy, the land grows toward sunrise, Burmah with the peninsula of Malacca comes into view, with some traces of an eastern archipelago, and a country beyond India of unknown and undefined extent; so much land in this direction, indeed, that the sea is suppressed. Taprobane is still there, but the old geographer who put upon his map the interior lakes of Africa where Livingstone found them to be, would not take the sea for granted on the southern confines of Africa more than he would on the eastern regions of Asia. Africa assumes large proportions, and the name L
asgow, Scotland21.33 Bergen, Norway88.61 Stockholm20.4 Copenhagen18.35 Berlin23.56 Mannheim22.47 Prague14.1 Cracow13.3 Brussels28.06 Paris22.64 Geneva31.07 Milan38.01 Rome30.86 Naples29.64 Marseilles23.4 Lisbon27.1 Coimbra Port118.8 Bordeaux34.00 Algiers36.99 St Petersburg17.3 Simpheropol, Crimea14.83 Kutais (E shore of Black Sea)59.44 Bakou (S of Caspian)13.38 Ekatherinburg, Ural Mts.14.76 Barnaoul, Siberia11.80 Pekin, China26.93 Canton, China69.30 Singapore, Malacca97 Sierra Leone, Africa86.2 Uttray Mullay, India267.2 Madras, India44.6 Calcutta, India76.4 Cherrapoonjee, India592 Khasia, India610 Raised up-on′. (Shipbuilding.) Having the upper works hightened; the opposite of razeed. Rais′er. (Carpentry.) The front of a step. The elevation of a step. A riser. The flat portion of a step is the tread. Rais′ing. 1. (Metal-working.) The process of forming circular work or embossing in sheet-metal by striking up or raising
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