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Pausanias, Description of Greece 16 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 31-40 2 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 2 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
ived a share of the land and the king's daughter Batia, he built a city Dardanus, and when Teucer died he called the whole country Dardania.As to the migration of Dardanus from Samothrace to Asia and his foundation of Dardania or Dardanus, see Diod. 5.48.2ff.; Conon 21; Stephanus Byzantius, s.v. *da/rdanos; compare Hom. Il. 20.215ff. According to one account he was driven from Samothrace by a flood and floated to the coast of the Troad on a raft. See Lycophron, Cassandra 72ff., with the scholia of Tzetzes; Scholiast on Hom. Il. xx.215. As to his marriage with Batia, daughter of Teucer, and his succession to the kingdom, compare Diod. 4.75.1. According to Stephanus Byzantius, s.v. *da/rdanes, Batia, the wife of Dardanus, was a daughter of Tros, not of Teucer. And he had sons born to him, Ilus and Erichthonius, of whom Ilus died childless,Compare Tzetzes, Scholi
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
Tzetzes, it was sent before the Greek army assembled at Aulis; according to the Scholiast on Hom. Il. iii.206, it was despatched from Tenedos. Herodotus says that the envoys were sent after the landing of the army in the Troad. Sophocles wrote a play on the subject of the embassy, called The Demand for the Surrender of Helen. See TGF (Nauck 2nd ed.), pp. 171ff.; The Fragments of Sophocles, ed. A. C. Pearson, vol. i. pp. 121ff. Libaniun 245; Hyginus, Fab. 113; Ovid, Her. xiii.93ff. Protesilaus was reckoned by Paus. 1.34.2 among the men who after death received divine honours from the Greeks. He was buried in the Thracian Chersonese, opposite the Troad, and was there worshipped as a god (Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 532). His grave at Elaeus, or Eleus, in the peninsula was enclosed in a sacred precinct, and his worshippers testified their devotion by dedicating to him
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
s put in to the shore or anchored off the coast, heard the trampling of horses, the shouts of warriors, and the clash of arms. See Paus. 3.19.11-13; Philostratus, Her. xx.32-40. As the mortal remains of Achilles were buried in the Troad, and only his immortal spirit was said to dwell in the White Isle, the statement of Apollodorus that the Greeks interred him in the White Isle must be regarded as erroneous, whether the error is due to Apollodorus himself, or, as heir fate. This last seems to have been the version followed by Apollodorus. The reason of the calamity which befell Laocoon is explained by Servius on the authority of Euphorion. He tells us that when the Greek army landed in the Troad, the Trojans stoned the priest of Poseidon to death, because he had not, by offering sacrifices to the sea god, prevented the invasion. Accordingly, when the Greeks seemed to be departing, it was deemed advisable to sacrif
Demosthenes, Against Apatourius, section 20 (search)
After this there befell Parmeno, men of the jury, a dire misfortune. He was dwelling in OphryniumA city in the Troad. because of his being an exile from home, when the earthquake in the Chersonese occurred; and in the collapse of his house his wife and children perished. Immediately on hearing of the disaster he departed by ship from Athens. Aristocles, although the man had adjured him in the presence of witnesses not to pronounce judgement against him without his co-arbitrators, when Parmeno had left the country because of the disaster, pronounced an award against him by default.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 2 (search)
Xerxes, vying with the zeal displayed by the Carthaginians, surpassed them in all his preparations to the degree that he excelled the Carthaginians in the multitude of peoples at his command. And he began to have ships built throughout all the territory along the sea that was subject to him, both Egypt and Phoenicia and Cyprus, Cilicia and Pamphylia and Pisidia, and also Lycia, Caria, Mysia, the Troad, and the cities on the Hellespont, and Bithynia, and Pontus. Spending a period of three years, as did the Carthaginians, on his preparations, he made ready more than twelve hundred warships. He was aided in this by his father Darius, who before his death had made preparations of great armaments; for Darius, after Datis, his general, had been defeated by the Athenians at Marathon, had continued to be angry with the Athenians for having won that battle. But Darius, when already about to cross overi.e. from Asia into Europe via the
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 72 (search)
Scione, holding the Athenians in contempt because of their defeat at Delium, revolted to the Lacedaemonians and delivered their city into the hands of Brasidas, who was in command of the Lacedaemonian forces in Thrace. In Lesbos, after the Athenian seizure of Mytilene, the exiles, who had escaped the capture in large numbers, had for some time been trying to return to Lesbos, and they succeeded at this time in rallying and seizing Antandrus,On the south coast of the Troad, some fifteen miles from Lesbos. from which as their base they then carried on war with the Athenians who were in possession of Mytilene. Exasperated by this state of affairs the Athenian people sent against them as generals Aristeides and Symmachus with an army. They put in at Lesbos and by means of sustained assaults took possession of Antandrus, and of the exiles some they put to death and others they expelled from the city; then they left a garrison to guar
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 42 (search)
nine ships to the thirteen he already had, and sailing with them to Halicarnassus he exacted money from that city. After this he sacked MeropisThe island of Cos. and returned to Samos with much plunder. And since a great amount of booty had been amassed, he divided the spoils among the soldiers at Samos and his own troops, thereby soon causing the recipients of his benefactions to be well disposed toward himself. About the same time the Antandrians,Just outside the Troad to the south-east. who were held by a garrison,Of Persians (Thuc. 8.108). sent to the Lacedaemonians for soldiers, with whose aid they expelled the garrison and thus made their country a free place to live in; for the Lacedaemonians, finding fault with Pharnabazus for the sending of the three hundred ships back to Phoenicia, gave their aid to the inhabitants of Antandrus. Of the historians, Thucydides ended his history,i.e. with this year. having included
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 45 (search)
In Greece Dorieus the Rhodian, the admiral of the triremes from Italy, after he had quelled the tumult in Rhodes,Cp. chap. 38.5; Thuc. 8.44. set sail for the Hellespont, being eager to join Mindarus; for the latter was lying at Abydus and collecting from every quarter the ships of the Peloponnesian alliance. And when Dorieus was already in the neighbourhood of Sigeium in the Troad, the Athenians who were at Sestus, learning that he was sailing along the coast, put out against him with their ships, seventy-four in all. Dorieus held to his course for a time in ignorance of what was happening; but when he observed the great strength of the fleet he was alarmed, and seeing no other way to save his force he put in at Dardanus. Here he disembarked his soldiers and took over the troops who were guarding the city, and then he speedily got in a vast supply of missiles and stationed his soldiers both on the fore-parts of the sh
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 38 (search)
But west of this region two peninsulas stretch out from it into the sea, which I will now describe. On the north side one of the peninsulas begins at the Phasis and stretches seaward along the Pontus and the Hellespont, as far as Sigeum in the Troad; on the south side, the same peninsula has a seacoast beginning at the Myriandric gulf that is near Phoenicia, and stretching seaward as far as the Triopian headland. On this peninsula live thirty nations.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 26 (search)
This Otanes, then, who sat upon that seat, was now made successor to Megabazus in his governorship. He captured Byzantium, Calchedon, Antandrus in the Troad, and Lamponium, and with ships he had taken from the Lesbians, he took Lemnos and Imbros, both of which were still inhabited by Pelasgians.
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