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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 4 (search)
gone, or by speed, for I have men-of-war with which I can overtake their craft. But for my part, I swear by the gods that I shall not pursue them, nor shall anyone say about me that I use a man so long as he is with me and then, when he wants to leave me, seize him and maltreat him and despoil him of his possessions. Nay, let them go, with the knowledge that their behaviour toward us is worse than ours toward them. To be sure, I have their wives and children under guard in Tralles,A city in Caria. but I shall not deprive them of these, either, for they shall receive them back because of their former excellence in my service.” Such were his words; as for the Greeks, even those who had been somewhat despondent in regard to the upward march, when they heard of the magnanimity of Cyrus they continued on their way with greater satisfaction and eagerness.After this Cyrus marched four stages, twenty parasangs, to the Chalus river, which is a plethrum in width and full of large, tame fish; t
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
ians, the Illyrian with his Illyrians, and so also all other nations, we are told. Those in Europe, at any rate, are said to be free and independent of one another even to this day. But Cyrus, finding the nations in Asia also independent in exactly the same way, started out with a little band of Persians and became the leader of the Medes by their full consent and of the HyrcaniansThe extent of his kingdom by theirs; he then conquered Syria, Assyria, Arabia, Cappadocia, both Phrygias, Lydia, Caria, Phoenicia, and Babylonia; he ruled also over Bactria, India, and Cilicia; and he was likewise king of the Sacians, Paphlagonians, Magadidae, and very many other nations, of which one could not even tell the names; he brought under his sway the Asiatic Greeks also; and, descending to the sea, he added both Cyprus and Egypt to his empire. He ruled over these nations, even though theyThe secret of his power did not speak the same language as he, nor one nation the same as another; for all that
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 5 (search)
ry large nation, and had made the king of Arabia his vassal; he already had Hyrcania under his dominion and was closely besetting Bactria. So he thought that if he should break the power of the Medes, he should easily obtain dominion over all the nations round about; for he considered the Medes the strongest of the neighbouring tribes. Accordingly, he sent around to all those under his sway and to Croesus, the king of Lydia, to the king of Cappadocia; to both Phrygias, to Paphlagonia, India, Caria, and Cilicia; and to a certain extent also he misrepresented the Medes and Persians, for he said that they were great, powerful nations, that they had intermarried with each other, and were united in common interests, and that unless some one attacked them first and broke their power, they would be likely to make war upon each one of the nations singly and subjugate them. Some, then, entered into an alliance with him because they actually believed what he said; others, because they were brib
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 4, chapter 5 (search)
they proceeded to the division ofThe spoils are divided the spoil, laughing heartily at his joke about the Persian horsemanship, while he called his captains and ordered them to take the horses and the grooms and the trappings of the horses, and to count them off and divide them by lot so that they should each have an equal share for each company. And again Cyrus ordered proclamation to beCyrus finds squires for his Persians made that if there were any one from Media or Persia or Bactria or Caria or Greece or anywhere else forced into service as a slave in the army of the Assyrians or Syrians or Arabians, he should show himself. And when they heard the herald's proclamation, many came forward gladly. And he selected the finest looking of them and told them that they should be made free, but that they would have to act as carriers of any arms given them to carry; and for their sustenance he himself, he said, would make provision. And so he led them at once to his captains and presente
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 7, chapter 4 (search)
Then the Carians fell into strife and civil warAdusius settles a civil war in Caria with one another; they were intrenched in strongholds, and both sides called upon Cyrus for assistance. So while Cyrus himself stayed in Sardis to make siege-engines and battering rams to demolish the walls of such as should refuse to submit, he entan army to Adusius, a Persian who was not lacking in judgment generally and not unskilled in war, and who was besides a very courteous gentleman, and sent him into Caria; and the Cilicians and Cyprians also joined most heartily in this expedition. Because of their enthusiastic allegiance he never sent a Persian satrap to govern eittheir native princes. Tribute, however, he did receive from them, and whenever he needed forces he made a requisition upon them for troops. Adusius now set out for Caria at the head of his army; and there came to him representatives from both parties of the Carians, ready to receive him into their walls to the injury of the rival f
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 6 (search)
o more than fair; for if any danger threatens anywhere, it is we who shall have to ward it off.” With these words he concluded his address onCyrus appoints the satraps that occasion; and then he chose out from the number of his friends those whom he saw eager to go on the conditions named and who seemed to him best qualified, and sent them as satraps to the following countries: Megabyzus to Arabia, Artabatas to Cappadocia, Artacamas to Phrygia Major, Chrysantas to Lydia and Ionia, Adusius to Caria (it was he for whom the Carians had petitioned), and Pharnuchus to Aeolia and Phrygia on the Hellespont. He sent out no Persians as satraps over Cilicia or Cyprus or Paphlagonia, because these he thought joined his expedition against Babylon voluntarily; he did, however, require even these nations to pay tribute. As Cyrus then organized the service, so is it even to this day: the garrisons upon the citadels are immediately under the king's control, and the colonels in command of the garrison
Xenophon, Agesilaus (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 1 (search)
aration for a campaign, and warned the cities that lay on the lines of march to Caria to have their markets ready stocked. He advised by letter the Greeks of Ionia, t Ephesus. Now Tissaphernes reflected that Agesilaus was without cavalry, while Caria was a difficult country for mounted men, and he thought that Agesilaus was wroth with him on account of his deceit. Concluding, therefore, that his estate in Caria was the real object of the coming attack, he sent the whole of his infantry acroreached the country where cavalry could not operate. But instead of marching on Caria, Agesilaus forthwith turned round and made for Phrygia. Picking up the various saying this he meant to deceive him again, and that now he would really invade Caria. Accordingly he sent his infantry across into Caria as before, and stationed hiCaria as before, and stationed his cavalry in the plain of the Maeander. But Agesilaus did not play false: in accordance with his notice he marched straight to the neighbourhood of Sardis; and for t
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 4, line 104 (search)
en buckles of the belt that passed over his double cuirass were fastened, so the arrow struck the belt that went tightly round him. It went right through this and through the cuirass of cunning workmanship; it also pierced the belt beneath it, which he wore next his skin to keep out darts or arrows; it was this that served him in the best stead, nevertheless the arrow went through it and grazed the top of the skin, so that blood began flowing from the wound. As when some woman of Meonia or Caria strains purple dye on to a piece of ivory that is to be the cheek-piece of a horse, and is to be laid up in a treasure house - many a horseman is fain to bear it, but the king keeps it as an ornament [kosmos] of which both horse and driver may be proud - even so, O Menelaos, were your shapely thighs and your legs down to your fair ankles stained with blood. When King Agamemnon saw the blood flowing from the wound he was afraid, and so was brave Menelaos himself till he saw that the barbs o
Polybius, Histories, book 3, Plan: Causes of Wars (search)
I shall pause in my narrative to introduce aFirst digression on the Roman Constitution. disquisition upon the Roman Constitution, in which I shall show that its peculiar character contributed largely to their success, not only in reducing all Italy to their authority, and in acquiring a supremacy over the Iberians and Gauls besides, but also at last, after their conquest of Carthage, to their conceiving the idea of universal dominion. Along with this I shall introduce anotherSecond on Hiero of Syracuse. digression on the fall of Hiero of Syracuse. After these digressions will come the disturbances in5. The attempted partition of the dominions of Ptolemy Epiphanes, B. C. 204. Egypt; how, after the death of King Ptolemy, Antiochus and Philip entered into a compact for the partition of the dominions of that monarch's infant son. I shall describe their treacherous dealings, Philip laying hands upon the islands of the Aegean, and Caria and Samos, Antiochus upon Coele-Syria and Phoenicia.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 36 (search)
11.246). apertos, storm-beaten; Mela says the bay was pleraque asper accessu. Ancona (from the Greek form *)agkw/n): this well-known city of Picenum contained a temple of Venus Marina; cf. Juv. 4.40 domum Veneris, quam Dorica sustinet Ancon. Cnidum: in this famous city at the extremity of the Cnidian Chersonese in Caria were several temples of Aphrodite, and the renowned statue of the goddess by Praxiteles. harundinosam: the reeds of Cnidus were a great article of export on account of their excellence for manufacture into paper; cf. Plin. NH 16.157; Aus. Ep. 7.49 nec iam fissipedis per calami vias grassetur Cnidiae sulcus harundinis. Amathunta: a seaport town
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