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T. Maccius Plautus, Curculio, or The Forgery (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian the Grammarian.] (search)
THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian the Grammarian.] On an errand of Phædromus, Curculio (Curculio) goes to Caria, that (Ut) he may obtain some money; there he despoils the rival (Rivalem) of Phædromus of his ring. He writes a letter, and seals it with that seal. Lyco, when he sees it, recognizes (Cognoscit) the seal of the Captain; that (Ut) he may send him his mistress, he pays the money to the Procurer. The Captain threatens to summon Lyco (Lyconem) and the Procurer to justice: he himself (Ipsus) discovers his sister that was lost, at whose request (Oratu) he gives her in marriage to Phædromu
T. Maccius Plautus, Curculio, or The Forgery (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 1 (search)
RUS You are too exacting, in requiring that of him which no Procurer possesses. PHÆD. Now, I've sent my Parasite hence to CariaTo Caria: Caria was in Asia Minor. Schmieder justly observes, that the Parasite must have used the wings of Dædalus, to gCaria: Caria was in Asia Minor. Schmieder justly observes, that the Parasite must have used the wings of Dædalus, to go from Epidaurus in the Peloponnesus, to Caria, and discharge his commission and return in four days only. A Roman audience would not, however, be likely to know much about the relative distance of places so far off., to ask for money on loan from mCaria was in Asia Minor. Schmieder justly observes, that the Parasite must have used the wings of Dædalus, to go from Epidaurus in the Peloponnesus, to Caria, and discharge his commission and return in four days only. A Roman audience would not, however, be likely to know much about the relative distance of places so far off., to ask for money on loan from my friend; if he doesn't bring me this, which way to turn myself I know not. PALINURUS If you salute the Deities, towards the rightTowards the right: Dextrovorsum. A quibble seems to be intended in the use of this word; Palinurus, in saying "turn toCaria, and discharge his commission and return in four days only. A Roman audience would not, however, be likely to know much about the relative distance of places so far off., to ask for money on loan from my friend; if he doesn't bring me this, which way to turn myself I know not. PALINURUS If you salute the Deities, towards the rightTowards the right: Dextrovorsum. A quibble seems to be intended in the use of this word; Palinurus, in saying "turn to the right hand," probably meæis, sarcastically, "turn to a right course of life." I think; now this is this altar of Venus before their door. PHÆD. I have already vowed to bring meTo bring me: "Me inferre." These words may mean, according to the <
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 2 (search)
are to you. THAIS Such is the fact; but do allow me to arrive at the point I wish. In the mean time, the Captain, who had begun to take a fancy to me, set out to Caria;Set out for Caria: This was a country of Asia Minor upon the sea-coast, opposite to the island of Rhodes. since when, in the Caria: This was a country of Asia Minor upon the sea-coast, opposite to the island of Rhodes. since when, in the interval, I became acquainted with you. You yourself are aware how very dear I have held you; and how I confess to you all my nearest counsels. PHAEDRIA Nor will Parmeno be silent about that. PARMENO O, is that a matter of doubt? THAIS Attend; I entreat you. My mother died there recently; her brother is somewhat greedy after wealt
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Heautontimorumenos: The Self-Tormenter (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 3 (search)
the thousand drachmae. SYRUS Dear me, is it to be doubted ? I think so. CHREMES What then do you intend doing? SYRUS What, I? I shall go to Menedemus; I'll tell him she is a captive from Caria, rich, and of noble family; if he redeems her, there will be a considerable profit in this transaction. CHREMES You are in an error. SYRUS Why so ? CHREMES I'll now an
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 4 (search)
Soon after this civil discord was composed, he preferred a charge of extortion against Cornelius Dolabella, a man of consular dignity, who had obtained the honour of a triumph. On the acquittal of the accused, he resolved to retire to Rhodes, A city and an island, near the coast of Caria, famous for the huge statue of the Sun, called the Colossus. The Rhodians were celebrated not only for skill in naval affairs, but for learning, philosophy, and eloquence. During the latter periods of the Roman republic, and under some of the emperors, numbers resorted there to prosecute their studies; and it also became a place of retreat to discontented Romans. with the view not only of avoiding the public odium which he had incurred, but of prosecuting his studies with leisure and tranquillity, under Apollonius, the son of Molon, at that time the most celebrated master of rhetoric. While on his voyage thither, in the winter season, he was taken by pirates near the island of Pharmacusa, Pharmacusa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
istoriographer, in his first booke of his Turkish storie. Wherein hee followeth divers verie probable conjectures. The first taken from the verie name it selfe, for that the worde Turk signifieth a Shepheard or one that followeth a vagarant and wilde kinde of life. By which name these Scythian Tartars have ever beene noted, being called by the Greekes o-Kv4aLvo/ma8& or the Scythian shepheards. His second reason because the Turkes (in his time) that dwelt in Asia the lesse, to wit, in Lydia , Caria , Phrygia and Cappadocia , spake the very same language that these Tartars did, that dwelt betwixt the river Tanais or Don, and the countrey of Sarmatia , which (as is well knowen) are these Tartars called Crims. At this time also the whole nation of the Turkes differ not much in their common speech from the Tartar language. Thirdly because the Turke and the Crim Tartar agree so well together, as well in religion, as in matter of traffique never invading, or inurying one another: save that
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the Tartars, and other borderers to the country of Russia , with whom they have most to doe in warre, and peace. (search)
istoriographer, in his first booke of his Turkish storie. Wherein hee followeth divers verie probable conjectures. The first taken from the verie name it selfe, for that the worde Turk signifieth a Shepheard or one that followeth a vagarant and wilde kinde of life. By which name these Scythian Tartars have ever beene noted, being called by the Greekes o-Kv4aLvo/ma8& or the Scythian shepheards. His second reason because the Turkes (in his time) that dwelt in Asia the lesse, to wit, in Lydia , Caria , Phrygia and Cappadocia , spake the very same language that these Tartars did, that dwelt betwixt the river Tanais or Don, and the countrey of Sarmatia , which (as is well knowen) are these Tartars called Crims. At this time also the whole nation of the Turkes differ not much in their common speech from the Tartar language. Thirdly because the Turke and the Crim Tartar agree so well together, as well in religion, as in matter of traffique never invading, or inurying one another: save that
extensive grain business, his scribes carried their writing-implements in boxes with pendent leather tops, and with handles at the sides. As the scribe had two colors of ink, he needed two pens, and we see him on the monuments of Thebes, busy with one pen at work, and the other placed in that most ancient pen-rack, behind the ear. Such is represented in a painting at Beni Hassan. It is said that the best reeds for the purpose formerly grew near Memphis, on the Nile; near Cnidus of Caria, in Asia Minor; in Armenia and in Italy: those of the latter being of relatively poor quality. A place yet famous for them, and which may have supplied the ancient demand in part, is in the vicinity of the Persian Gulf, in a large fen or tract of soggy land supplied with water by the river Helle, a place of Arabia formed by united arms of the Euphrates and Tigris. They are cut in March, tied in bundles, laid six months in a manure-heap, where they assume a beautiful color, mottled yellow and black
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