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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter written to M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, conteining a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578. (search)
ow to certifie you of the fertilitie and goodnesse of the countrey, you shall understand that I have in sundry places sowen Wheate, Barlie, Rie, Oates, Beanes, Pease and seedes of herbes, kernels, Plumstones, nuts, all which have prospered as in England . The countrey yeeldeth many good trees of fruit, as Filberds in some places, but in all places Cherie trees, and a kind of Pearetree meet to graffe on. As for Roses, they are as common as brambles here: Strawberies, Dewberies, and Raspis, as comou shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of Isles of yce lie neere the shore: but up in the land they shall finde it hotter then in England in many parts of the countrey toward the South. This colde commeth by an accidentall meanes, as by the yce that commeth fleeting from the North partes of the worlde, and not by the situation of the countrey, or nature of the Climate. The cou
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Letters Patents graunted by her Majestie to Sir Humfrey Gilbert knight, for the inhabiting and planting of our people in America . (search)
of our people in America . ELIZABETH by the grace of God Queene of England , &c. To all people to whom these presents shall come, greeting.Kno in fee simple or otherwise, according to the order of the laws of England , as nere as the same conveniently may be, at his, and their will &nd enjoy all the privileges of free denizens and persons native of England , and within our allegiance: any law, custome, or usage to the contconveniently may, agreeable to the forme of the lawes & pollicy of England : and also, that they be not against the true Christian faith or religion now professed in the church of England , nor in any wise to withdraw any of the subjects or people of those lands or places from the alr, sir William Cecill knight, lord Burleigh, our high treasurer of England , and to the lord treasurer of England of us, for the time being, England of us, for the time being, and to the privie counsell of us, our heires and successours, or any foure of them for the time being, that he, they, or any foure of them, sh
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A report of the voyage and successe thereof, attempted in the yeere of our Lord 1583 by sir Humfrey Gilbert knight, with other gentlemen assisting him in that action, intended to discover and to plant Christian inhabitants in place convenient, upon those large and ample countreys extended Northward from the cape of Florida , lying under very temperate Climes, esteemed fertile and rich in Minerals, yet not in the actuall possession of any Christian prince, written by M. Edward Haie gentleman, and principall actour in the same voyage, who alone continued unto the end, and by Gods speciall assistance returned home with his retinue safe and entire. (search)
ant countreys apperteining unto the crowne of England : the same (as is to be conjectured by infallie as conveniently might be) unto the lawes of England : under which all people comming thither herease of high treason, according to the lawes of England . The 3. if any person should utter words sounSeptember, the heate is somewhat more then in England at those seasons: so men remaining upon the Se, nor much differing from the temperature of England . Those which have arrived there after Novembeaine of the Delight or Admirall returned into England , in whose stead was appointed Captaine Mauricaine also was amongst them that returned into England ) the same Frigate being most convenient to dipon they besought the Generall to returne for England , before they all perished. And to them of thewe changed our course, and returned backe for England , at which very instant, even in winding aboutat store of peason as good as any wee have in England : a man would thinke they had bene sowed there[14 more...]
f Florida unto those Islands which we now call the Newfoundland : all which they brought and annexed unto the crowne of England . Since when, if with like diligence the search of inland countreys had bene followed, as the discovery upon the coast, ast Indies for Spaine, John and Sebastian Cabot made discovery also of the rest from Florida Northwards to the behoofe of England . And whensoever afterwards the Spanyards (very prosperous in all their Southerne discoveries) did attempt any thing e) to prosecute effectually the full possession of those so ample and pleasant countreys apperteining unto the crowne of England : the same (as is to be conjectured by infallible arguments of the worlds end approching) being now arrived unto the timethen two yeres: many of which circumstances I will omit. The last place of our assembly, before we left the coast of England , was in Causet bay neere unto Plimmouth: then resolved to put unto the sea with shipping and provision, such as we had,
Notes.IF by contrary windes we be driven backe upon the coast of England , then to repaire unto Silley for a place of our assembly or meeting. If we be driven backe by contrary winds that we can not passe the coast of Ireland , then the place of our assembly to be at Beare haven or Baltimore haven. If we shall not happen to meete at cape Rase, then the place of Rendez vous to be at cape Briton, or the neerest harbour unto the Westward of cape Briton. If by meanes of other shipping we may not safely stay there, then to rest at the very next safe port to the Westward; every ship leaving their marks behinde them for the more certainty of the after commers to know where to finde them. The marks that every man ought to leave in such a case, were of the Generals private device written by himselfe, sealed also in close waxe, and delivered unto every shippe one scroule, which was not to be opened untill occasion required, whereby every man was
er June, which in March, Apriell & May, hath bene performed out of England in 22 dayes and lesse. We had winde alwayes so scant from West northe sea. Upon Tuesday the 11 of June, we forsooke the coast of England . So againe Tuesday the 30 of July (seven weekes after) we got sighpart were such as had bene by us surprised upon the narrow seas of England , being pirats and had taken at that instant certaine Frenchmen lad to take possession of those lands to the behalfe of the crowne of England , and the advancement of Christian religion in those Paganish regioand dignitie thereof, had delivered unto him (after the custome of England ) a rod & a turffe of the same soile, entring possession also for hf, agreeable (so neere as conveniently might be) unto the lawes of England : under which all people comming thither hereafter, either to inhaband executed as in case of high treason, according to the lawes of England . The 3. if any person should utter words sounding to the dishonour
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe relation of the New found lande, and the commodities thereof. (search)
vehement coldnesse. Besides, as in the monethes of June, July, August and September, the heate is somewhat more then in England at those seasons: so men remaining upon the South parts neere unto Cape Rece, untill after Hollandtide, have not found the cold so extreme, nor much differing from the temperature of England . Those which have arrived there after November and December, have found the snow exceeding deepe, whereat no marvaile, considering the ground upon the coast, is rough and uneven,sion as might be spared for transporting home the sicke people. The Captaine of the Delight or Admirall returned into England , in whose stead was appointed Captaine Maurice Browne, before Captaine of the Swallow: who also brought with him into th Generall made choise to goe in his frigate the Squirrell (whereof the Captaine also was amongst them that returned into England ) the same Frigate being most convenient to discover upon the coast, and to search into every harbor or creeke, which a g
d want of clothes chiefly: Whereupon they besought the Generall to returne for England , before they all perished. And to them of the Golden Hinde, they made signes othe afternoone the 31 of August, we changed our course, and returned backe for England , at which very instant, even in winding about, there passed along betweene us warre against such an enemie, if it were the devill. The wind was large for England at our returne, but very high, and the sea rough, insomuch as the Frigat wheree man altogether. Last, being demanded what means he had at his arrivall in England , to compasse the charges of so great preparation as he intended to make the nen keeping much to the North, until we had got into the height and elevation of England : we met with very foule weather, and terrible seas, breaking short and high Pyooked out all that night, and ever after, untill wee arrived upon the coast of England : Omitting no small saile at sea, unto which we gave not the tokens betweene us
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A relation of Richard Clarke of Weymouth , master of the ship called the Delight, going for the discovery of Norembega, with Sir Humfrey Gilbert 1583. Written in excuse of that fault of casting away the ship and men, imputed to his oversight. (search)
three to goe every way to see what foode they could find to sustaine themselves, and appointed them to meete there all againe at noone with such foode as they could get. As we went aboord we found great store of peason as good as any wee have in England : a man would thinke they had bene sowed there. We rested there three dayes and three nights and lived very well with pease and berries, wee named the place Saint Laurence, because it was a very goodly river like the river of S. Laurence in Canad the visitors came aboord, as it is the order in Spaine, they demaunding what we were, he sayd we were poore fishermen that had cast away our ship in Newfound land, and so the visitors inquired no more of the matter at that time. Assoone as night was come he put us on land and bad us shift for our selves. Then had wee but tenne or twelve miles into France, which we went that night, and then cared not for the Spanyard. And so shortly after we came into England toward the end of the year 1583.
nth day of the same moneth, and returned into England . The other foure (through the assistance osame very temperate, but somewhat warmer then England at that season of the yeere, replenished withim, after the maner of the law and custome of England . Then he signified unto the company both saine and France, stretch out it selfe towards England only: In maner praying our ayde and helpe, asn himselfe came even unto this our country of England , then called the Island of Britaines, bending ap Owen Gwyneth, departing from the coast of England , about the yeere of our Lord God 1170. arrivend Sancius his sonnes, who were borne here in England : in true testimony whereof there is a faire hding the fish which is taken and brought into England by the English navy of fishermen, will not su. For after once we are departed the coast of England , wee may passe straightway thither, without d fresh waters taken in there, our men here in England at their returne home have found so wholsome [6 more...]
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