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Pausanias, Description of Greece, Achaia, chapter 3 (search)
d by the sons of Damasichthon. The name of the place where Damasichthon is buried is called Polyteichides. How it befell that Colophon was laid waste I have already related in my account of Lysimachus.Paus. 1.9.7 Of those who were transported to Ephesus only the people of Colophon fought against Lysimachus and the Macedonians. The grave of those Colophonians and Smyrnaeans who fell in the battle is on the left of the road as you go to Clarus. The city of Lebedus was razed to the ground by Lysimachus, simply in order that the population of Ephesus might be increased. The land around Lebedus is a happy one; in particular its hot baths are more numerous and more pleasant than any others on the coast. Originally Lebedus also was inhabited by the Carians, until they were driven out by Andraemon the son of Codrus and the Ionians. The grave of Andraemon is on the left of the road as you go from Colophon, when you have crossed the river Calaon. Teos used to be inhabited by Minyans of Orchome
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 9 (search)
n; the Artemis, Poseidon and also Lysander by Dameas; the Apollo and Zeus by Athenodorus. The last two artists were Arcadians from Cleitor. Behind the offerings enumerated are statues of those who, whether Spartans or Spartan allies, assisted Lysander at Aegospotami.405 B.C They are these: —Aracus of Lacedaemon, Erianthes a Boeotian . . . above Mimas, whence came Astycrates, Cephisocles, Hermophantus and Hicesius of Chios; Timarchus and Diagoras of Rhodes; Theodamus of Cnidus; Cimmerius of Ephesus and Aeantides of Miletus. These were made by Tisander, but the next were made by Alypus of Sicyon, namely:—Theopompus the Myndian, Cleomedes of Samos, the two Euboeans Aristocles of Carystus and Autonomus of Eretria, Aristophantus of Corinth, Apollodorus of Troezen, and Dion from Epidaurus in Argolis. Next to these come the Achaean Axionicus from Pellene, Theares of Hermion, Pyrrhias the Phocian, Comon of Megara, Agasimenes of Sicyon, Telycrates the Leucadian, Pythodotus of Corinth and Eua
Plato, Theages, section 129d (search)
And moreover, in regard to the Sicilian business,The disastrous Sicilian expedition of 415-413 B.C. Cf. Thuc. vi. and vii. many will tell you what I said about the destruction of the army. As to bygones, you may hear from those who know: but there is an opportunity now of testing the worth of what the sign says. For as the handsome Sannio was setting out on campaign, the sign occurred to me, and he has gone now with Thrasyllus on an expedition bound for Ephesus and Ionia.409 B.C., when Thrasyllus succeeded in recovering Colophon for Athens. He was one of the commanders put to death by the Athenians after the battle of Arginusae, 406 B.C. I accordingly expect him to be either killed or brought very near it, and I have great fears for our force as a whole.
Plato, Ion, section 530a (search)
SocratesWelcome, Ion. Where have you come from now, to pay us this visit? From your home in Ephesus?IonNo, no, Socrates; from Epidaurus and the festival there of Asclepius.SocratesDo you mean to say that the Epidaurians honor the god with a contest of rhapsodes also?IonCertainly, and of music“Music” with the Greeks included poetry. in general.SocratesWhy then, you were competing in some contest, were you? And how went your competition?IonWe carried off the first prize, Socrat
Plato, Ion, section 533c (search)
or Thamyras,A Thracian Bard. or Orpheus,A Thracian Bard. or Phemius,The minstrel who was forced to sing to the suitors of Penelope (Od 1. 154, 22. 330). the rhapsode of Ithaca, but is at a loss and has no remark to offer on the successes or failures in rhapsody of Ion of Ephesus.IonI cannot gainsay you on that, Socrates: but of one thing I am conscious in myself—that I excel all men in speaking on Homer and have plenty to say, and everyone else says that I do it well; but on the others I am not a good speaker. Yet now, observe what that means.SocratesI do observe it, Ion, and I am going to point out to yo
Plato, Ion, section 541c (search)
Or do you suppose that the Greeks feel a great need of a rhapsode in the glory of his golden crown, but of a general none at all?IonIt is because my city,Ephesus. Socrates, is under the rule and generalship of your people, and is not in want of a general; whilst you and Sparta would not choose me as a general, since you think you manage well enough for yourselves.SocratesMy excellent Ion, you are acquainted with ApollodorusNothing else is known of this general. of Cyzicus, are you not?IonWhat might he be?SocratesA man whom the Athenians have often chosen as their general, though a foreigner;
Plato, Ion, section 541d (search)
invests with the high command and other offices although they are foreigners, because they have proved themselves to be competent. And will she not choose Ion of Ephesus as her general, and honor him, if he shows himself competent? Why, you Ephesians are by origin Athenians,Androclus of Attica founded Ephesus as the Ionian city kthey have proved themselves to be competent. And will she not choose Ion of Ephesus as her general, and honor him, if he shows himself competent? Why, you Ephesians are by origin Athenians,Androclus of Attica founded Ephesus as the Ionian city known to the Greeks of Plato's time. are you not, and Ephesus is inferior to no city? they have proved themselves to be competent. And will she not choose Ion of Ephesus as her general, and honor him, if he shows himself competent? Why, you Ephesians are by origin Athenians,Androclus of Attica founded Ephesus as the Ionian city known to the Greeks of Plato's time. are you not, and Ephesus is inferior to no city?
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
account of him; but there is also a second, that he stayed here till the end of his life; and a third, the aforesaid mythical account, which tells of his disappearance in the island; and as a fourth one might set down the account of the Heneti, for they too tell a mythical story of how he in some way came to his end in their country, and they call it his apotheosis. Now the above distances are put down in accordance with the data of Artemidorus;Artemidorus (flourished about 100 B.C.), of Ephesus, was an extensive traveller and a geographer of great importance. He wrote a geography of the inhabited world in eleven books, a Periplus of the Mediterranean, and Ionian Historical Sketches. But his works, except numerous fragments preserved in other authors, are now lost. but according to the Chorographer,See 5. 2. 7 and footnote. the distances from Brentesium as far as GarganumMonte Gargano. amount to one hundred and sixty-five miles, whereas according to Artemidorus they amount to mo
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK II, section 33 (search)
rians, this is another like instance of his ignorance; for all such as are called out to be colonies, although they be ever so far remote from one another in their original, receive their names from those that bring them to their new habitations. And what occasion is there to speak of others, when those of us Jews that dwell at Antioch are named Antiochians, because Seleucns the founder of that city gave them the privileges belonging thereto? After the like manner do those Jews that inhabit Ephesus, and the other cities of Ionia, enjoy the same name with those that were originally born there, by the grant of the succeeding princes; nay, the kindness and humanity of the Romans hath been so great, that it hath granted leave to almost all others to take the same name of Romans upon them; I mean not particular men only, but entire and large nations themselves also; for those anciently named Iberi, and Tyrrheni, and Sabini, are now called Romani. And if Apion reject this way of obtaining t
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK II, section 125 (search)
teemed to be gods; for it is not reasonable to imitate the clownish ignorance of Apion, who hath no regard to the misfortunes of the Athenians, or of the Lacedemonians, the latter of whom were styled by all men the most courageous, and the former the most religious of the Grecians. I say nothing of such kings as have been famous for piety, particularly of one of them, whose name was Cresus, nor what calamities he met with in his life; I say nothing of the citadel of Athens, of the temple at Ephesus, of that at Delphi, nor of ten thousand others which have been burnt down, while nobody cast reproaches on those that were the sufferers, but on those that were the actors therein. But now we have met with Apion, an accuser of our nation, though one that still forgets the miseries of his own people, the Egptians; but it is that Sesostris who was once so celebrated a king of Egypt that hath blinded him. Now we will not brag of our kings, David and Solomon, though they conquered many nations;
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