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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 8 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
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Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 164 (search)
But when Darius was come down to the coastThe coast of Cilicia; the time referred to is that preceding the battle of Issus. with all his forces, and Alexander was shut up in Cilicia in extreme want, as you yourself said, and was, according to your statement, on the point of being trampled under the hoofs of the Persian horse, and when there was not room enough in the city to contain your odious demonstrations and the letters that you carried around, dangling them from your fingers, while you pointed to my face as showing my discouragement and consternation, and in anticipation of some mishap to Alexander you called me “gilded horn,” and said the garland was already on my head,The Greeks gilded the horns of cattle that were about to be sacrificed, and put garlands on their heads. not even then did you take one step, but deferred it all for some more favorable opportun
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 2 (search)
wenty-five parasangs, to Tarsus,The birth-place of the apostle Paul. a large and prosperous city of Cilicia, where the palace of Syennesis, the king of the Cilicians, was situated; and through the middle of the city flows a river named the Cydnus, two plethra in width. The inhabitants of this city had abandoned it and fled, with Syennesis, to a stronghold upon the mountains—all of them, at least, except the tavern-keepers; and there remained also those who dwelt on the sea-coast, in Soli and Issus.Famous as the scene of one of the most important victories of Alexander the Great (333 B.C.). Now Epyaxa, the wife of Syennesis, had reached Tarsus five days ahead of Cyrus, but in the course of her passage over the mountains to the plain two companies of Menon's armycp. 20, above. had been lost. Some said that they had been cut to pieces by the Cilicians while engaged in a bit of plundering; another story was that they had been left behind, and, unable to find the rest of the army or the ro
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 1, chapter 4 (search)
five parasangs, to the Pyramus river, the width of which was a stadium.The stadium = 582 1/2 English feet. From there he marched two stages, fifteen parasangs, to Issus, the last city in Cilicia, a place situated on the sea, and large and prosperous. There they remained three days; and the ships from PeloponnesusSee Xen. Anab. 1.2.21. arrived to meet Cyrus, thirty-five in number, with Pythagoras the Lacedaemonian as admiral in command of them. They had been guided from Ephesus to Issus by Tamos the Egyptian, who was at the head of another fleet of twenty-five ships belonging to Cyrus—these latter being the ships with which Tamos had besieged Miletus, atte. together with seven hundred hoplites, over whom he continued to hold command in the army of Cyrus. And the ships lay at anchor alongside Cyrus' tent. It was at Issus also that the Greek mercenaries who had been in the service of Abrocomas—four hundred hoplites—joined Cyrus, after deserting Abrocomas, and so bore a share in his <