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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 18 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Locke to Jerusalem. (search)
morning we were in sight of an Iland, which we left on our left hande called Cephalonia , it is under the Venetians and well inhabited, with a faire towne strongly s One houre within night we sayled by the towne standing on the South cape of Cephalonia , whereby we might perceive their lights. There come oftentimes into the creeante , but we could not for that night. This Iland of Zante is distant from Cephalonia , 12 or 14 miles, but the towne of Cephalonia , from the towne of Zante , is Cephalonia , from the towne of Zante , is distant fortie miles. This night we went but little forward. The 30 day we remained still turning up and downe because the winde was contrary, and towards night the winde mended, so that we entered the channell betweene Cephalonia , & Zante , the which chanell is about eight or tenne miles over, and these two beare East and urke. About 2. houres before night, we had sight of the Islands of Zante and Cephalonia , which are from Modon one hundreth miles. The 12. day in the morning, wi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
much Corall, and we saw likewise Sardinia , which is an Iland subject to Spaine. The 13 in the morning we were hard by Sardinia . The 15 we did see an Iland neere Sicilia , and an Iland on Africa side called Cysimbre. The same day likewise we saw an Iland called Pantalaria, and that night we were thwart the middle of Sicilia . The 16 at night we were as farre as Capo Passaro, which is the Southeast part of Sicilia . The 24 we were put into a port called Porto de Conte, in an Iland called Cephalonia : it is an out Iland in the dominions of Grecia , and now at this present governed by the Signory of Venice, as the rest of Grecia is under the Turke, for the most part. The 27 we came from thence, and that day arrived at Zante which is also in Grecia : for at this present wee entred the parts of Grecia . The second of March we came from Zante ; and the same day were thwart of an Iland called Prodeno: and the 4 we were thwart of an Iland called Sapientia. There standeth a faire Towne and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made to Tripolis in Barbarie, in the yeere 1583. with a ship called the Jesus, wherein the adventures and distresses of some Englishmen are truely reported, and other necessary circumstances observed. Written by Thomas Sanders. (search)
Pursser Richard Burges, and the other Englishman, were taken and bound into chaines, to be hanged at their arrivall in Constantinople: and as the Lordes will was, about two dayes after, passing through the gulfe of Venice , at an Island called Cephalonia , they met with two of the duke of Venice his Gallies, which tooke that Galley, and killed the kings sonne, and his mother, and all the Turkes that were there, in number 150. and they saved the Christian captives, and would have killed the twoied in Zante , and afterward the other eight shipped themselves at Zante , in a shippe of the said Marcus Segorus, which was bound for England: and before we departed thence, there arrived the Assension, and the George Bonaventure of London in Cephalonia , in a harbour there, called Arrogostoria, whose Marchants agreed with the Marchants of our shippe, and so laded al the marchandise of our shippe into the said ships of London, who tooke us eight in as passengers, and so we came home, and withi