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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Galba (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 8 (search)
among The Fifteen, another in the college of Titius, and a third amongst the Augustals; and from that time to the middle of Nero's reign, he lived for the most part in retirement. He never went abroad so much as to take the air, without a carriage attending him, in which there was a million of sesterces in gold ready at hand; until at last, at the time he was living in the town of Fundi, the province of Hispanic Tarraconensis was offered him. After his arrival in the province, whilst he was sacrificing in a temple, a boy who attended with a censer, became all on a sudden grey-headed. This incident was regarded by some as a token of an approaching revolution in the government, and that an old man would succeed a young one: that is that he would succeed Nero. And not long after, a thunderbolt falling into a lake in Cantabria, It has been remarked before, that the Cantabria of the ancients is now the province of Biscay. twelve axes were found in it; a manifest sign of the supreme power.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
the duke of Medina Sidonia generall of the Fleete, ten Galeons, two Zabraes, 1300. Mariners, 3300. souldiers, 300. great pieces, with all requisite furniture. Biscay , under the conduct of John Martines de Ricalde Admiral of the whole Fleete, set forth tenne Galeons, 4. Pataches, 700. mariners, 2000. souldiers, 250. great piecere so battered with English shot, that that very night and the day following, two or three of them suncke right downe: and among the rest a certaine great ship of Biscay , which Captaine Crosse assaulted, which perished even in the time of the conflict, so that very few therin escaped drowning; who reported that the governours of tatitude, being distant from any land at the least 40 leagues. Heere the Duke of Medina generall of the Fleet commanded all his followers to shape their course for Biscay : and he himselfe with twenty or five and twenty of his ships which were best provided of fresh water and other necessaries, holding on his course over the maine O
The escape of the Primrose a tall ship of London, from before the towne of Bilbao in Biscay : which ship the Corrigidor of the same Province, accompanied with 97 Spaniards, offered violently to arrest, and was defeated of his purpose, and brought prisoner into England. Whereunto is added the Kings Commission for a generall imbargment or arrest of all English, Netherlandish, and Easterlings ships, written in Barcelona the 19 of May 1585. IT is not unknowen unto the world what danger our Englisch that he was doubtfull of these men what their intent was; neverthelesse he sayd nothing, nor seemed in any outward wise to mistrust them at all. Foorthwith there came a ship-boate wherein were seventie persons being Marchants and such like of Biscay : and besides this boate, there came also the Pinnesse which before had brought the other three, in which Pinnesse there came foure and twentie, as the Spaniards themselves since confessed. These made towards the Primrose, and being come thither,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
rmed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa: and that beeing rigged, armed and set in good order, they bee victualled for eight moneths, and that foorthwith there bee levied a thousand marinerement to presse a greater number, to the ende that these may bee able men for service. Moreover it is needfull for this armie that 20. pataches be brought from Biscay , and 20. Azabras from Castro . That the pataches bee from 50. to 60. tunnes: and that the Azabras bee like those which were in the expedition to Tercera. That e sinking of that great shippe, being also reputed rich by divers intelligences out of Spaine: which we then supposed not, & were doubtfull whether she had bin of Biscay or S. John de Luz in France laden with fish onely from Newfoundland . In this voyage I and my fleete tooke, sunke and burnt nine Spanish ships; which was loss
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The opinion of Don Alvaro Bacan, Marques of Santa Cruz, and high Admirall of Spaine, touching the armie of sir Francis Drake lying at the Isles of Bayona in Galicia , written in Lisbon the 26 of October after the account of Spaine in the yere 1585. (search)
bee: And likewise to arrest a Galeon of the Duke of Florence, which is very well armed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa: and that beeing rigged, armed and set in good order, they bee victualled for eight moneths, and that foorthwith there bee levied a thousand mariners of Catalunna and Genoa to bee divided among the Fleete, and bee conducted, as the of Tercera: furthermore that sixe thousande souldiers bee levied, giving commaundement to presse a greater number, to the ende that these may bee able men for service. Moreover it is needfull for this armie that 20. pataches be brought from Biscay , and 20. Azabras from Castro . That the pataches bee from 50. to 60. tunnes: and that the Azabras bee like those which were in the expedition to Tercera. That sufficient provision be made of artillerie, powder, match, and lead, and harquebu
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rico, Mona , Zacheo, the shoalds called Abreojos, and the isle of Bermuda . In which voyage he and his company tooke and sunke nine Spanish ships, wherof one was an armada of 600 tunnes. Written at the request of M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
ie in this miserable estate, I made for England , where I arrived at S. Ives in Cornewall about the latter ende of May 1595, scaping most dangerously in a great fogge the rocks of Silly. Thus by the providence of God landing safely, I was kindely intertained by all my friends, and after a short time learned more certaintie of the sinking of that great shippe, being also reputed rich by divers intelligences out of Spaine: which we then supposed not, & were doubtfull whether she had bin of Biscay or S. John de Luz in France laden with fish onely from Newfoundland . In this voyage I and my fleete tooke, sunke and burnt nine Spanish ships; which was losse to them, though I got nothing. Here follow certaine wordes of the language of Trinidad which I observed at my being there. Guttemock. A man. Tabairo, Dabarah, Or Dabarra. The heare of ones head. Dessie The forehead. Dasereth, or Dacosi An eye. Dalacoack The mouth. Archeh The teeth. Daria
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Great Lakes and the Navy, the. (search)
a potential strength that adds immensely to the maintenance of her present sea power. But England will in time be confronted with a new difficulty. The ores in that country are not suitable for steel making, and for some years past large quantities of ore have been imported from mines in the northern part of Spain. These mines are being rapidly exhausted. Fourfifths of the output goes to England, and it has been estimated that at the present rate ten years will exhaust the mines of the Biscay region. Of course there are other sources of supply, Sweden, for example; but they are not easily accessible, and cheapness of transportation is essential. The condition of affairs promises, therefore, to be very much the same, so far as materials go, as it was at that period when England passed from the use of wood to that of metal in building ships. Let us now look at the condition of the steel industry in the United States. In 1892 there were put out 16,036,043 tons of iron ore, of
so named as being made of the wool of the merino sheep. It is a lady's dress goods, all wool, and twilled on both sides. The Merino variety of sheep is a native of Spain, which country was celebrated for its wool in the time of Pliny. The greater number of the sheep of Spain belong to the mesta, or merino corporation, which has about 5,000,000 sheep in flocks of 10,000 each. Each flock has an officer, 50 shepherds, and 50 dogs. In summer, the sheep feed upon the elevated lands of Biscay, Navarre, and Arragon, and toward winter are driven southward to the fertile plains of New Castile, Andalusia, and Estramadura. The lambs come in January, and shearing commences the 1st of May, being carried on in houses where the flocks of sheep are folded on their northern march. 125 men shear 1,000 ewes per day, 50 weathers per man being considered a day's work. The ewes yield from 4 to 5 pounds of wool, the weathers from 7 to 8. The wool of each sheep is sorted into four varieties.
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 19: 1860-1863: Aet. 53-56. (search)
sla River, one at Burgos and Palencia from the northern tributaries, one at Soria and Segovia from the southern tributaries. If this could be done on such a scale as I propose, it would in itself be a work worthy of the Spanish government, and most creditable to any man who should undertake it. The fact is that nothing of the kind has ever been done yet anywhere. A single collection from the Minho would be sufficient, say from Orense or Melgaqo. From the northern rivers along the gulf of Biscay all that would be necessary would be one thoroughly complete collection from one of the little rivers that come down from the mountains of Asturias, say from Oviedo. The Ebro would require a more elaborate survey. From its upper course, one collection would be needed from Haro or Frias or Miranda; another from Saragossa, and one from its mouth, including the minnows common among the brackish waters near the mouth of large rivers. In addition to this, one or two of the tributaries of the
ed, or lost their lives in the tumult. The clothes which had been saved from the fires of Mobile, were destroyed, and the Spaniards, now as naked as the natives, suffered from the cold. Weapons and equipments were consumed or spoiled. Had the Indians made a resolute onset on this night or the next, the Spaniards Chap. II.} 1541. would have been unable to resist. But in a respite of a week, forges were erected, swords newly tempered; and good ashen lances were made, equal to the best of Biscay. When the Indians attacked the camp, they Mar. 15. found the Christians prepared. All the disasters which had been encountered, far from diminishing the boldness of the governor, served only to confirm his obstinacy by wounding his pride. Should he, who had promised greater booty than Mexico or Peru had yielded, now return as a defeated fugitive, so naked that his troops were clad only in skins and mats of ivy? The search for some wealthy April 25. region was renewed; the caravan mar
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