hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 32 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 21 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 18 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 16 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Copenhagen (Denmark) or search for Copenhagen (Denmark) in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Influence of trees upon Climate. --Joachim Frederic Sahouw, Professor of Botany at Copenhagen, speaks as follows of the influence of forests upon the atmosphere: "We find the most evident signs of it in the torrid zone. The forests increase the rain and moisture, and produce springs and running streams. Tracts destitute of woods become very strongly heated, the air above them ascends perpendicularly, and thus prevents the clouds from sinking, and the constant winds (trade winds or monsoons,) where they can blow uninterruptedly over large surfaces, do not allow the transition of vapors into the form of drops. In the forests, on the contrary, the clothed soil does not become so heated, and, besides the evaporation from the trees favors cooling; therefore, when the currents of air loaded with vapors reach, the forests, they meet with that which condenses them and change into rain. Since, moreover, evaporation of the earth goes on more slowly beneath the trees, and since the