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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 154 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 33 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 24 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 22 2 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition. You can also browse the collection for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) or search for Munich (Bavaria, Germany) in all documents.

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Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 1: 1807-1827: to Aet. 20. (search)
terial for this account of the student life of the two friends at Heidelberg and of their teachers was chiefly furnished by Alexander Braun himself at the close of his own life, after the death of Agassiz. The later sketches of the Professors at Munich in 1832 were drawn in great part from the same source. As the distance and expense made it impossible for Agassiz to spend his vacations with his family in Switzerland, it soon became the habit for him to pass the holidays with his new friendhave never seen, but I will watch to see whether they are turned inward. . . . Braun to Agassiz. Carlsruhe, August 9, 1827. . . . This is to tell you that I have determined to leave Heidelberg in the autumn and set forth on a pilgrimage to Munich, and that I invite you to be my traveling companion. Judging by a circumstantial letter from Dollinger, the instruction in the natural sciences leaves nothing to be desired there. Add to this that the lectures are free, and the theatre open to
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 2: 1827-1828: Aet. 20-21. (search)
2: 1827-1828: Aet. 20-21. Arrival in Munich. lectures. relations with the professors. Sa nearer view as we advanced, for it encircles Munich at some distance from the town. We arrived hehan that of Heidelberg awaited our students at Munich. Among their professors were some of the most active spirits among the young naturalists at Munich, and was known by the name of The Little Acadealk although it is then dark. The environs of Munich are covered with snow, and the people have bee in my eyes. . . . To his brother Auguste. Munich, December 26, 1827. . . . After my long fase new and more satisfying intellectual life of Munich, it stirred afresh from time to time, not withhem to read usefully? . . . To his father. Munich, March 3, 1828. . . . What you tell me of totany and zoology, whom we had already seen at Munich, and by whom we were most cordially received. side the pupils of the Academy of Fine Arts at Munich, I think that every soul who could paint, were[9 more...]
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 3: 1828-1829: Aet. 21-22. (search)
llustravit Dr. L. Agassiz. To his brother. Munich, July 27, 1828. . . . Various things which not my fault. . . . To his sister Cecile. Munich, October 29, 1828. . . .I have never writtethis second vacation trip. To his parents. Munich, September 26, 1828. . . .The instruction fy Alpine excursion. Braun, impatient to leave Munich, had already started the preceding day, promis Mettenius. Alexander Braun to his father. Munich, November 18, 1828. . . .I will tell you ho to be taken of them, etc. To his father. Munich, February 14, 1829. . . . But now I must taminds of the friends. Braun to his father. Munich, February 15, 1829. . . . Last Thursday we ete my medical studies, and for this I came to Munich eighteen months ago. Still I could not make up in the following letter:— To his brother. Munich, May 22, 1829. . . . As it was necessary foon of his medical studies. To his parents. Munich, July 4, 1829. . . . I hope when you read t[4 more...]
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 4: 1829-1830: Aet. 22-23. (search)
lness and death of his grandfather. return to Munich. plans for future scientific publications. tnto his hands by the Director of the Museum of Munich. It will be seen with what ardor he threw himrasbourg, M. Voltz, even offered to send me at Munich the whole collection of fossil fishes from the disposed to accept my Fishes. He has been at Munich for some days, and Schimper has been talking wg. For this reason I intend returning soon to Munich to complete the business, since Cotta is to being Munich were completed. To his parents. Munich, November 9, 1830. . . . According to your er. Give all possible care to your affairs in Munich, put them in perfect order, leave nothing to b When you receive this I shall be no longer in Munich; by means of a last draft on M. Eichthal I hav, they near the end. Braun to his father. Munich, November 7, 1830. Were I to leave Munich nrong bent in that direction. My experience in Munich was very varied. With Dollinger I learned to [14 more...]
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 5: 1830-1832: Aet. 23-25. (search)
indness. his death. poverty in Paris. home letters concerning embarrassments and about his work. singular dream. On the 4th of December, 1830, Agassiz left Munich, in company with Mr. Dinkel, and after a short stay at St. Gallen and Zurich, spent in looking up fossil fishes and making drawings of them, they reached Concise rt, considered as a recommendation, would certainly help on the publication greatly. But in this respect I have long been straitened; Auguste knows that I had at Munich an artist who was to complete what I had left there for execution, and that I stopped his work on leaving Concise. If the stagnation of the book-trade continues oth feel very much our separation from the elder Schimper, who, spite of his great desire to join us at Carlsruhe and accompany us to Paris, was not able to leave Munich. . . . P. S. My love to Auguste. To-day (Sunday) I went again to see M. Humboldt about Auguste's Concerning a business undertaking in Mexico. plan, but did
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 6: 1832: Aet. 25. (search)
itted to have these collections in Switzerland and work them up there. From Paris, also, it would not be so easy to transfer myself to Germany, whereas I could consider Neuchatel as a provisional position from which I might be called to a German university. . . . In the mean time, while waiting hopefully the result of his negotiations with Nechatel, Agassiz had organized with his friends, the two Brauns, a bachelor life very like the one he and Alexander had led with their classmates in Munich. The little hotel where they lodged had filled up with young German doctors, who had come to visit the hospitals in Paris and study the cholera. Some of these young men had been their fellow-students at the university, and at their request Agassiz and Braun resumed the practice of giving private lectures on zoology and botany, the whole being conducted in the most informal manner, admitting absolute freedom of discussion, as among intimate companions of the same age. Such an interchange n
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 7: 1832-1834: Aet. 25-27. (search)
um of eighty louis, which is all that is subscribed for my professorship, I cannot continue them on any large scale. I await now with anxiety Cotta's answer to my last proposition; but whatever it be, I shall begin the lithographing of the plates immediately after the New Year, as they must be carried on under my own eye and direction. This I can well do since my uncle, Dr. Mayor in Lausanne, gives me fifty louis toward it, the amount of one year's pay to Weber, my former lithographer in Munich. I have therefore written him to come, and expect him after New Year. With my salary I can also henceforth keep Dinkel, who is now in Paris, drawing the last fossils which I described. . . . No answer to this letter has been found beyond such as is implied in the following to M. Coulon. Humboldt to M. Coulon, Fils. Berlin, January 21, 1833. . . . It gives me great pleasure to acknowledge the flattering welcome offered by you and your fellow-citizens to M. Agassiz, who stands so
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 7: 1834-1837: Aet. 27-30. (search)
eral tertiary species with living ones in order to satisfy myself of their specific identity, and then my task will be accomplished. Next comes the putting in order of all my notes. My long vacations will give me time to do this with the greatest care. . . . His second visit to England, during which the above letter was written, was chiefly spent in reviewing the work of his artist, whom he now reinforced with a second draughtsman, M. Weber, the same who had formerly worked with him in Munich. He also attended the meeting of the British Association in Dublin, stayed a few days at Oulton Park for another look at the collections of Sir Philip Egerton, made a second grand tour among the other fossil fishes of England and Ireland, and returned to Neuchatel, leaving his two artists in London with their hands more than full. While Agassiz thus pursued his work on fossil fishes with ardor and an almost perilous audacity, in view of his small means, he found also time for various oth
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 9: 1837-1839: Aet. 30-32. (search)
founded a lithographic printing establishment in Neuchatel, which was carried on for many years under his direction. Thus far his plates had been lithographed in Munich. Their execution at such a distance involved constant annoyance, and sometimes great waste of time and money, in sending the proofs to and fro for correction. Tfounded a lithographic establishment at Neuchatel in the hope of avoiding in future the procrastinations to which my proofs were liable when the work was done at Munich. . . . I hope that my new publications will be sufficiently well received to justify me in supporting an establishment unique of its kind, which I have founded soz's glacier work. Arnold Guyot and he had been friends from boyhood. Their university life separated them for a time, Guyot being at Berlin while Agassiz was at Munich, and they became colleagues at Neuchatel only after Agassiz had been for some years established there. From that time forward there was hardly any break in their
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 10: 1840-1842: Aet. 33-35. (search)
nd independent researches it is unnecessary to refer to them here. M. Escher de la Linth took also an active part in the work of the later summer. To his working corps Agassiz had added the foreman of M. Kahli, an engineer at Bienne, to whom he had confided his plans for the summer, and who furnished him with a skilled workman to direct the boring operations, assist in measurements, etc. The artist of this year was M. Jaques Burkhardt, a personal friend of Agassiz, and his fellow-student at Munich, where he had spent some time at the school of art. As a draughtsman he was subsequently associated with Agassiz in his work at various times, and when they both settled in America Mr. Burkhardt became a permanent member of Agassiz's household, accompanied him on his journeys, and remained with him in relations of uninterrupted and affectionate regard till his own death in 1867. He was a loyal friend and a warm-hearted man, with a thread of humor running through his dry good sense, which m
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