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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arbitration, international Court of, (search)
enna. His Excellency Commander Jean Baptiste Pagano Guarnaschelli, Senator of the Kingdom, First President of the Court of Cassation at Rome. His Excellency Count Tornielli Brusati di Vergano, Senator of the Kingdom, Ambassador to Paris. Commander Joseph Zanardelli. Attorney at Law, Deputy to the National Parliament. Japan. Mr. I. Motono, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary at Brussels. Mr. H. Willard Denison, Law Officer of the Minister for Foreign Affairs at Tokio. Netherlands. Mr. T. M. C. Asser, Ll.D., member of the Council of State, ex-Professor of the University of Amsterdam. Mr. F. B. Coninck Liefsting, Ll.D., President of the Court of Cassation. Jonkheer A. F. de Savornin Lohman, Ll.D., ex-Minister of the Interior, ex-Professor of the Free University of Amsterdam, member of the Lower House of the States-General. Jonkheer G. L. M. H. Ruis de Beerenbrouck, ex-Minister of Justice, Commissioner of the Queen in the Province of Limbour
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
lenipotentiary, London. Greece, Rumania, and Servia. Arthur S. Hardy, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Athens. Guatemala and Honduras. W. Godfrey Hunter, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Guatemala City. Haiti. William F. Powell, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Port au Prince. Italy. ————, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Rome. Japan. Alfred E. Buck, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Tokio. Korea. Horace N. Allen, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Seoul. Liberia. Owen L. W. Smith, Minister Resident and Consul-General, Monrovia. Mexico. Powell Clayton, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Mexico. Netherlands. Stanford Newel, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, The Hague. Nicaragua and Salvador. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. (See Costa Rica.) Paraguay and Uruguay. Wi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morse, Edward Sylvester 1838- (search)
Morse, Edward Sylvester 1838- Educator; born in Portland, Me., June 18, 1838; studied under Professor Agassiz at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard; was Professor of Comparative Anatomy and Zoology in Bowdoin College in 1871-74: and Professor of Zoology in the Imperial University at Tokio, Japan, in 1877-80. He is an authority on Japanese ceramics, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and other scientific organizations. He is the author of Japanese homes and their surroundings; First book of Zoology, and numerous papers on zoology, ethnology, and archaeology.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
ntinued. Foreign Power and Object of Treaty.Where Concluded.Date. Japan—Continued: Treaty of Peace, amity, and commerceTokioJuly 29, 1858 Convention of Reducing import dutiesTokioJan. 28, 1864 Convention of Indemnities. (U. S., Great Britain, FTokioJan. 28, 1864 Convention of Indemnities. (U. S., Great Britain, France, and Holland sign)YokohamaOct. 22, 1864 Convention of Regarding expense of shipwrecksTokioMay 17, 1880 Treaty of ExtraditionTokioApril 29, 1886 Korea: Treaty of Peace, amity, commerce, navigationYin-ChuenMay 22, 1882 Loo-Choo: ConventionTokioMay 17, 1880 Treaty of ExtraditionTokioApril 29, 1886 Korea: Treaty of Peace, amity, commerce, navigationYin-ChuenMay 22, 1882 Loo-Choo: Convention of Permitting unobstructed tradeNapaJuly 11, 1854 Liberia: Treaty of Commerce and navigationLondonOct. 21, 1862 Luxemburg: Treaty of ExtraditionBerlinOct. 29, 1883 Madagascar: Treaty of CommerceAntananarivoFeb. 14, 1867 Mexico: Treaty of ExTokioApril 29, 1886 Korea: Treaty of Peace, amity, commerce, navigationYin-ChuenMay 22, 1882 Loo-Choo: Convention of Permitting unobstructed tradeNapaJuly 11, 1854 Liberia: Treaty of Commerce and navigationLondonOct. 21, 1862 Luxemburg: Treaty of ExtraditionBerlinOct. 29, 1883 Madagascar: Treaty of CommerceAntananarivoFeb. 14, 1867 Mexico: Treaty of ExtraditionMexicoDec. 11, 1861 Convention of Adjustment of claimsWashingtonJuly 4, 1868 Convention of Citizenship of emigrantsWashingtonJuly 10, 1868 Convention of Mutual right to pursue Indians across the boundaryWashingtonJuly 29, 1882 Conventio
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
of the United States, dies at Cahawba, Ala., aged sixty-seven......April 18, 1853 Kane sails from New York in the brig Advance, under the auspices of the United States navy, in search of Sir John Franklin......May 30, 1853 Koszta affair, at Smyrna, Turkey......June 21, 1853 Com. M. C. Perry, a brother of Oliver Hazard Perry, with a fleet of seven vessels, proceeds to Japan with a letter from President Fillmore to the tycoon, soliciting a treaty. Commodore Perry arrives at the bay of Yedo......July 14, 1853 World's Fair, Crystal Palace, opening at New York City; President Pierce present......July 14, 1853 William Walker's filibustering expedition to Sonora, Mexico......July, 1853 Thirty-third Congress, first session, assembles......Dec. 5, 1853 James Gadsden, of South Carolina, minister to Mexico, by treaty purchases her territory south of the Gila River, now known as the Gadsden purchase, and included in Arizona, containing 45,535 square miles, for $10,000,000.
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 63: in the Northwest, among the Indians; trip to Alaska; life in Portland, Ore.; 1874 to 1881 (search)
accompanied the general and the strangers on one of the Ocean Steam Navigation Company's large steamers on an excursion to the Cascades of the Columbia. On the way up we habitually gathered in a large room of observation, just in front of the lofty pilot house. Grant and most of the company were smoking, while he told incidents of his journey around the world. Among other things he described in a very graphic way his visit to Japan. He said he was received by the princes and officials at Tokio in great style. They were questioning him with reference to establishing a constitutional government in Japan. One of them said: General, we would like to have a government such as you have, or such as England has, but we are afraid that if we give the right of suffrage to the people they will vote us out of office; of course, we would like to participate in the liberal government that we desire to establish. The general replied: But do not go so fast; give the people a right to vote o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
being followed with enthusiasm. Lafcadio Hearn made Japan his own. His Glimpses of unfamiliar Japan (1894), leaves from the diary of an Impressionist (1911), out of the East (1895), in Ghostly Japan (1899), and others are too well known to require comment. A contribution of much interest to this literature is Eliza Ruhamah Scidmore's Jinrikisha days in Japan (1891). She declares that Japan six times revisited is as full of charm and novelty as when I first went ashore from the wreck of the Tokio. A missionary who wrote Adventures in Patagonia (1880) wrote also Life in Hawaii (1882), both of them foundation books. He became identified with everything Hawaiian, and wrote many letters from there to The American journal of Science and to The missionary Herald. This indefatigable worker in the missionary realm was the Rev. Titus Coan, whose son, Dr. Titus Munson Coan, has written a brochure on The climate of Hawaii (1990) and on The natives of Hawaii: a study in Polynesian charm (1
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Appendix B. (search)
5Never built. *** Contoocook Class. 10 screw-sloops, clippers, single deck:132,348 Arapahoe132,348Never built. Contoocook (Albany)132,348Sold in 1872. Keosauqua132348Never built. Manitou ( Worcester)132,348 Mondamin132348Never built. Mosholu (Severn)132,348Sold, 1877. Pushmataha (Congress).132,348 Tahgayuta132,348Never built. Wanslosett132348Never built. Willamette132,348Never built. Kearsarge Class. 4 screw-sloops :8 to 101,023 (average). Kearsarge71 031 Oneida91,032Sunk, Yedo, 1870. Tuscarora10997 Wachusett91,032 Shenandoah Class. 6 screw-sloops :8 to 161,367 to 1,533 Canandaigua91,395 Lackawanna91,533 Monongahela91,378 Sacramento91,367Wrecked 1867. Shenandoah91,378 Ticonderoga91,533 Ossipee Class. 4 screw-sloops :10 to 131,240 Juniata91,240 Ossipee91,240 Adirondack91,240Wrecked near Abaco, Aug. 23. 1862. Housatonic91,240Sunk (torpedo), Feb. 17, 1864. Serapis Class. 8 screw-sloops :121,380 Algoma (Benicia)121,380Launched, 1869. Confiance121,38
ave made my party their guests during our stay in the country and have a house here, at Kobi and Tokio, fitted up for our accommodation. Mrs. Grant, Fred & Young—dubbed the Commodore—join me in kig to add to this letter by way of explanation or elucidation. It tells its own story. Tokio, Japan, July 16″ 1879. My dear General:—Your letter inclosing the chapter on Hatcher's Run reache inhabitants and the marvelous advance in their civilization within so short a period. Tokio, Japan, August 1st 1879. My dear General:—Your letter enclosing the within chapter reached me in l A. Badeau. Letter no. Fifty-four. The following letter requires no comment. Tokio, Japan, August 25th 1879. My dear General,—My visit to this interesting country—and abroad—is nowndidacy for office and the opposition which was likely to come from certain quarters. Tokio, Japan, Aug. 30th 1879. My dear General,—You will see from the date above that we did
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
n hands would tear Therefrom the token of His equal care, And make thy symbol of His truth a lie! The poor, dumb slave whose shackles fall away In His compassionate gaze, grubbed smoothly out, To mar no more the exercise devout Of sleek oppression kneeling down to pray Where the great oriel stains the Sabbath day! Let whoso can before such praying-books Kneel on his velvet cushion; I, for one, Would sooner bow, a Parsee, to the sun, Or tend a prayer-wheel in Thibetar brooks, Or beat a drum on Yedo's temple-floor. No falser idol man has bowed before, In Indian groves or islands of the sea, Than that which through the quaint-carved Gothic door Looks forth,—a Church without humanity! Patron of pride, and prejudice, and wrong,— The rich man's charm and fetich of the strong, The Eternal Fulness meted, clipped, and shorn, The seamless robe of equal mercy torn, The dear Christ hidden from His kindred flesh, And, in His poor ones, crucified afresh! Better the simple Lama scattering wide, Whe
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