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December 20. George W. Jones, late United States Minister to Bogota, was arrested at New York on a charge of treason, and sent to Fort Lafayette.--New York World, Dec. 21. In the House of Representatives as Washington, D. C., a resolution was adopted, thanking Colonel Mulligan and his command for their heroic defence of Lexington, Mo., and authorizing the Twenty-third regiment of Illinois, to inscribe on their colors the name Lexington. General Burnside arrived at Annapolis, Md., this evening to take command of the expedition destined for the North Carolina coast. Seven hundred regulars of the force surrendered to the rebels in Texas by major Lynde, passed through Rochester, N. Y., destined for Rome and Syracuse, whence they went to Sackett's Harbor and Oswego, to garrison the forts at those places. An engagement took place to-day near Drainesville, on the Leesburg turnpike, Va., between a foraging party under command of Brig.-Gen. E. O. C. Ord, (consisting o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
d Minister Plenipotentiary, Brussels. Bolivia. George H. Bridgman, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, La Paz. Brazil. Charles Page Bryan, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Rio de Janeiro. Chile. Henry L. Wilson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Santiago. China. Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Peking. Colombia. Charles Burdett Hart, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Bogota. Costa Rica. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. Denmark. Laurits S. Swenson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Copenhagen. Dominican republic. William F. Powell, Charge d'affaires, Port au Prince. Ecuador. Archbald J. Sampson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Quito. Egypt. John G. Long, Agent and Consul-General, Cairo. France. Horace Porter, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipote
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
eaty of Commercial and judicialPekingNov. 17, 1880 Treaty of Peace with the powersPekingSept. 7, 1901 Colombia: Convention of Peace, amity, commerce, navigationBogotaOct. 3, 1824 Convention of ExtraditionBogotaMay 7, 1888 Costa Rica: Treaty of Friendship, commerce, navigationWashingtonJuly 10, 1851 Convention of Adjustment BogotaMay 7, 1888 Costa Rica: Treaty of Friendship, commerce, navigationWashingtonJuly 10, 1851 Convention of Adjustment of claimsSan JoseJuly 2, 1860 Denmark: Convention of Friendship, commerce, navigationWashingtonApril 26, 1826 Convention of To indemnify the U. S.CopenhagenMar. 28, 1830 Convention of Discontinuance of Sound duesWashingtonApril 11, 1857 Convention of NaturalizationCopenhagenJuly 20, 1872 Dominican Republic: Convention of Am2, 1887 Convention of ExtraditionWashingtonJuly 29, 1899 Treaty of International arbitrationThe Hague New Granada: Treaty of Peace, amity, navigation, commerceBogotaDec. 12, 1846 Convention of Consular powersWashingtonMay 4, 1850 Convention of ClaimsWashingtonSept. 10, 1857 Nicaragua: Treaty of Friendship, commerce, naviga
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the early drama, 1756-1860 (search)
timents expressed in a dignified and flexible blank verse, varied at times by prose. Bird's tragedy of Peru, Oralloossa (1832), but more especially his Broker of Bogota (1834), both produced by Forrest, are among the most significant of American dramas. The character of Febro in The Broker of Bogota, energetic, with a middle-claBogota, energetic, with a middle-class mind but courageous and with a passion for his children, is admirably conceived. Bird was also known as a novelist, and one of his romances, Nick of the woods, dramatized by Louisa Medina in 1838, proved to be one of the most successful melodramas of the time. His Infidel was dramatized by Benjamin H. Brewster and played in Phan the background, and there is no clear line to be drawn between those which are historical and those which are not. To the latter class belong Bird's Broker of Bogota, and a tragedy of peculiar interest, Octavia Brigaldi, by Mrs. Conner, in which she acted in the title r61e in 1837. The play was repeated often in this country
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
printer), 95 Bradstreet, Anne, III, 154-156, 157, 278 Bradstreet, Simon, 154 Brant, Joseph, 202 Bravo, the, 301 Brayley, Rev., James, 153 Bread and Cheese Club, 297 Brewster, Benjamin H., 222 Brief account of the Agency of the Honorable John Winthrop, a, 152 Brief remarks on the defence of the Halifax libel, etc., 128 Brillon, Mme., 100 Bristed, John, 293 British prison ship, the, 182 British review, the, 206 British spy in Boston, the, 237 n. Broker of Bogota, 222,224 Brook Farm, 339-340, 345 Brooke, Henry, 165 Brother Jonathan, 309 Brothers, Thomas, 207 Brougham, John, 232 Brown, Charles Brockden, 287-292, 293, 295, 307, 308, 313 Brown, David Paul, 223 n., 224--John, 344 Brown, T. A., 227 n. Browne, Sir, Thomas, 104, 322 Browning, 261, 264, 266, 268, 274 Brownson, Orestes A., 333 Bruce, P. A., 216 n. Brutus, 220, 224 Bryant, Dr., Peter, 263 n. Bryant, W. C., 150, 163, 180, 183, 212, 240, 260-278, 279, 280, 2
ndid record in the battles against Banks and Steele. In June, 1864, he was assigned to command the district of West Louisiana, succeeding Gen. Richard Taylor, and subsequently he was until March 31, 1865, in command of the district of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona, and at Houston on the 27th indignantly refused the terms of surrender offered by Gen. Lew Wallace at Point Isabel, declaring that he would not basely yield all that we have been fighting for during the last four years, namely, nationality and the rights of self government. His command at this time included Steele's Texas division of cavalry, Bee's Texas division of cavalry, Cooper's division of Indians, Bagby's division of Texas and Louisiana cavalry, and Slaughter's brigade. After the war General Walker served as consul-general at Bogota, and as special commissioner to invite the South American republics to the Pan-American convention won the complimentary mention of Secretary Blain He died at Washington, July 20, 1893.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Southern Historical Society: its origin and history. (search)
Garland, Arkansas. Governor Isham G. Harris, Tennessee. General J. S. Marmaduke, Missouri. General S. B. Buckner, Kentucky. W. W. Corcoran, Esq., Washington, D. C. The President appointed the following gentlemen members of the Executive Committee: General Dabney H. Maury, Richmond, Va., Chairman. General Maury, so long and prominently identified with the Society, resigned his post in the Executive Committee June 18, 1888, whilst he was United States Minister at Bogota, South America. There have been other changes in the Executive Committee by death and other causes, and by appointments to vacancies. Colonel Charles S. Venable, University of Virginia. Colonel William Preston Johnston, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, Va. Colonel Robert E. Withers, Wytheville, Va. Colonel Joseph Mayo, Richmond, Va. Rev. John Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va., Lieutenant-Colonel Archer Anderson, Richmond, Va. Major Robert Stiles, Richmond, Va. George L. Christian, Esq.,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), In the Confederate service. (search)
formed as a result. A further result was the securing from Congress of a small annual appropriation for the purpose of arming the State military. General Maury always said this meeting aroused such vital interest in the subject in every State that the United States now has the most efficient national militia in the world. In 1885, General Maury was appointed United States envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the United States of Colombia by Mr. Cleveland. He remained at Bogota until after the election of Mr. Harrison. Made his home in Richmond. Since his return from the United States of Colombia, General Maury had resided with relatives in this city and with his son, Mr. Dabney H. Maury, Jr., at Peoria, Ill. Few men and women in Richmond are unfamiliar with his rather small, spare, but stiffly erect figure. All who knew him loved him. General Maury angry was something few persons ever saw. He was the soul of good fellowship. He was a man with a heart—a big
The Revolution in New Granada. --Official advices received at Washington from New Granada indicate that the entire country will soon be in the hands of the Revolutionists.--Mosquero, at the head of the Liberals, had arrived in the vicinity of Bogota, the capital, and the position of President Ospina was considered very precarious. All the principal towns were in the possession of Mosquero, including Medellen and the port of Nare, which is considered the key of the State of Antiequia. The Pda indicate that the entire country will soon be in the hands of the Revolutionists.--Mosquero, at the head of the Liberals, had arrived in the vicinity of Bogota, the capital, and the position of President Ospina was considered very precarious. All the principal towns were in the possession of Mosquero, including Medellen and the port of Nare, which is considered the key of the State of Antiequia. The Panama delegation to the Congress at Bogota had been made prisoners by the Revolutionists.
Affairs in New Granada.Bogota not yet taken — expected descent on the Isthmus — great excitement among the p15, says: All regular mail communication with Bogota being still suspended, the only intelligence receivas at last reports Gen. Mosquera had not marched on Bogota on the 17th of April. On that day Mr. Chambers, accrge and enthusiastic, while the Government force at Bogota, he says, is composed principally of persons who weOther accounts, however, state that the citizens of Bogota are united in their opposition to the revolutionistce.--Until the decisive battle is fought at or near Bogota, it is impossible to say which party will succeed. attack from General Paris, as he had been sent from Bogota to meet him, soon after the defeat of Canas in Tunjarer of dispatches for all the foreign ministers in Bogota. Those for the United States are important. He supposes that Bogota must be taken by this (so the story always goes) as the plan of attack had already been dec
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