Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Breme (Bremen, Germany) or search for Breme (Bremen, Germany) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), International law, (search)
n subjects or others; third, that whatever force the laws of one country have in another depends solely on the municipal laws of the latter. There have been numerous congresses of international law experts for the purpose of simplifying and making more definite the obligations which one country owes to another, and in these congresses the United States has occupied a conspicuous place. The Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations held its first session in Brussels, Oct. 10, 1873, and subsequent ones were held in Geneva, The Hague, Bremen, Antwerp, Frankfort, London, Berne, Cologne, Turin, and Milan. An Institute of International Law was organized in Ghent in 1873, and has since held numerous sessions in various cities of Europe, The most conspicuous action of the nations concerning the abolition of international hostilities was taken in the Peace Conference at The Hague, in 1899, to which the United States was also a party. See codes; field, David Dudley.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kohl, John George 1808-1878 (search)
Kohl, John George 1808-1878 Traveller; born in Bremen, Germany, April 28, 1808; travelled in the United States in 1854-58. His publications relating to the United States include History of the discovery of the United States coast; History and investigation of the Gulf stream; Travels in the United States; History of the two oldest charts in the New world; History of the discovery of the northeastern coast of America, and a number of lectures on the History of the discovery of America. Hees include History of the discovery of the United States coast; History and investigation of the Gulf stream; Travels in the United States; History of the two oldest charts in the New world; History of the discovery of the northeastern coast of America, and a number of lectures on the History of the discovery of America. He was also the author of a Lecture on the plan of a Chartographical depot for the history and geography of the American continent. He died in Bremen, Germany, Oct. 28, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vinland (search)
mes of Leif and Thorfinn, subject to the various influences which affected similar writings at that period the world over. An interesting and valuable confirmation of the simple fact of the visit of the Northmen to Vinland is given us by Adam of Bremen, who visited Denmark between 1047 and 1073, when the voyages would have been within the memory of living men and natural subjects of conversation. In speaking of the Scandinavian countries, in his book, Adam describes the colonies in Iceland andished men of Norway. The following spring he put his ship in order for the voyage to Iceland; and when all his preparations had been made, and his ship was lying at the wharf, awaiting favorable winds, there came to him a Southerner, a native of Bremen in the Saxonland, who wished to buy his house-neat. I do not wish to sell it, says he. I will give thee half a mork in gold for it, says the Southerner. This Karlsefni thought a good offer, and accordingly closed the bargain. The Southerner we