Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) or search for Dominican Republic (Dominican Republic) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, David 1780- (search)
Porter, David 1780- Naval officer; born in Boston, Mass., Feb. 1, 1780; was appointed a midshipman, April 16, 1798, and, as lieutenant on the frigate Constellation, fought L'Insurgente in February, 1799, and was promoted soon afterwards. He was wounded in an engagement with a pirate (January, 1800) off Santo Domingo, and was first lieutenant of the Enterprise, which captured a Tripolitan corsair. He afterwards commanded an expedition that destroyed some feluccas, laden with wheat, under the batteries at Tripoli. where he was wounded. In October, 1803, David Porter. he was captured in the Philadelphia when she grounded in the harbor of Tripoli, and was a prisoner and slave for eighteen months. In 1806, in command of the Enterprise, he fought and severely handled twelve Spanish gunboats near Gibraltar. In 1812 he was commissioned captain and placed in command of the Essex, in which he made a long and successful cruise in the Pacific Ocean. This cruise was one of the most
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
Savannah for the evacuation of the province June 14, 1782 Savannah, Ga., evacuated by the British July 11, 1782 Treaty of amity and commerce concluded by Mr. Adams, on part of the United States, with HollandOct. 8, 1782 Preliminary articles of peace signed at Paris by Richard Oswald for Great Britain, and by John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and Henry Laurens for the United StatesNov. 30, 1782 British evacuate Charleston, S. C.Dec. 14, 1782 French army embarks from Boston for San Domingo, having been in the United States two years five months and fourteen days Dec. 24, 1782 Sweden recognizes independence of United States Feb. 5, 1783 Denmark recognizes independence of United States Feb. 25, 1783 Congress being unable to pay either officers or men of the army, an anonymous address is circulated, March 11, 1783, advising the army at Newburg, N. Y., to enforce its claims. The situation is critical, but Washington, by an admirable address, obtains from the officers a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Salvert, Perier du 1690- (search)
Salvert, Perier du 1690- Colonial governor; born in France about 1690; entered the French navy, in which service he became an officer; was appointed governor of Louisiana in 1724. His administration was marked by inefficiency. On Nov. 29, 1729, the Natchez Indians, after being exasperated by evil persons, massacred all the male inhabitants in their country. Later Perier endeavored to restore the French prestige by sending against the Natchez an expedition of 1,000 men, who took several hundred prisoners and sent them to Santo Domingo, where they were sold as slaves. Salvert returned to France in 1733.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Santana, Pedro 1801-1864 (search)
Santana, Pedro 1801-1864 Statesman; born in Hincha, Santo Domingo, June 29, 1801; studied law; appointed brigadier-general and served in the rebellion against the Haitian government in 1844; led 2,400 men, with whom he defeated the southern army of 15,000 on March 19; elected President in November of the same year; favored theed in the rebellion against the Haitian government in 1844; led 2,400 men, with whom he defeated the southern army of 15,000 on March 19; elected President in November of the same year; favored the movement for the annexation of Santo Domingo to the United States which was defeated by Baez. He died in Santo Domingo, June 14, 1864.ed in the rebellion against the Haitian government in 1844; led 2,400 men, with whom he defeated the southern army of 15,000 on March 19; elected President in November of the same year; favored the movement for the annexation of Santo Domingo to the United States which was defeated by Baez. He died in Santo Domingo, June 14, 1864.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Santo Domingo, (search)
rwards by its present name. It was called Santo Domingo by Bartholomew Columbus for the double reaather; so Bartholomew gave it the title of Santo Domingo. The island was discovered by Columbus innto Domingo and Haiti. The The City of Santo Domingo (from an old print). town of Santo DomingSanto Domingo was founded Aug. 4, 1496. The natives were kind and friendly towards the discoverers. So loving20,000, had been so wasted in the mines of Santo Domingo and Cuba, under the lash of the Spaniards led from Spain as governor, or viceroy, of Santo Domingo, succeeding Ovando. He was accompanied bying to establish commercial relations with Santo Domingo, the President of the United States sent asubject of the annexation of the island of Santo Domingo to the domain of the republic. In Novembeort in the spring Old French sugar-mill, Santo Domingo. of 1872 did not lead to a ratification, a as a national measure. The government of Santo Domingo ceded to a private company (1873) a large [6 more...]
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Simcoe, John Graves -1806 (search)
Simcoe, John Graves -1806 Military officer; born near Exeter, England, Feb. 25, 1752; entered the army in 1770; came to America with a company of foot, with which he fought in the battles of Brandywine and Monmouth; raised a battalion which he called The Queen's Rangers ; trained them for light and active service; and with them performed important services, especially in the South. In June, 1779, Clinton gave him the local rank of lieutenant-colonel. His light corps was always in advance of the army and engaged in gallant exploits. His corps was disbanded after the war, and its officers were placed on half-pay. Simcoe was governor of Canada in 1791-94; was made major-general in 1794, and lieutenant-general in 1798. He was governor and commander-in-chief of Santo Domingo in 1796-97. He died in Torbay, England, Oct. 26, 1806.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Slavery. (search)
Slavery. In 1562 John Hawkins, an English navigator, seeing the want of slaves in the West Indies, determined to enter upon the piratical traffic. Several London gentlemen contributed funds liberally for the enterprise. Three ships were provided, and with these and 100 men Hawkins sailed to the coast of Guinea, where, by bribery, deception, treachery, and force, he procured at least 300 negroes and sold them to the Spaniards in Hispaniola, or Santo Domingo, and returned to England with a rich freight of pearls, sugar, and ginger. The nation was shocked by the barbarous traffic, and the Queen (Elizabeth) declared to Hawkins that, if any of the Africans were carried away without their own consent, it would be detestable, and call down the vengeance of Heaven upon the undertakers. He satisfied the Queen and continued the traffic, pretending that it was for the good of the souls of the Africans, as it introduced them to Christianity and civilization. Already negro slaves had
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Soule, Pierre 1802- (search)
ns of preventing the flames from destroying his own house. Under such circumstances we ought neither to regard the circumstances or count the odds which Spain might enlist against us. We forbear to enter into the question, whether the present condition of the island would justify such a measure. We should, however, be recreant to our duty, be unworthy of our gallant forefathers, and commit base treason against our posterity, should we permit Cuba to be Africanized and become a second St. Domingo, with all its attendant horrors to the white race, and suffer the flames to extend to our own neighboring shores, seriously to endanger or actually to consume the fair fabric of our Union. We fear that the course and current of events are rapidly tending to such a catastrophe. We, however, hope for the best, though we ought certainly to be prepared for the worst. We also forbear to investigate the present condition of the questions at issue between the United States and Spain. A l
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spain, War with (search)
er the escort of a convoy commanded by Captain (now Admiral) Higginson, of the battle-ship Massachusetts. Before sailing from Guantanamo I had expected to receive from the harbor of Santiago tugs, lighters, and appliances for disembarking, and I had hoped to meet during the night, when traversing the Windward Passage, similar appliances for landing, but when day dawned this hope had been dispelled. The expedition turned eastward, moving slowly along the northern coasts of Haiti and Santo Domingo, pursuing almost the identical track followed by the Great Admiral on his first voyage of discovery as he prepared to return to Spain four centuries before. On the evening of the 23d we passed in sight of the point of land on the northern coast where the first Spanish colony was planted by Columbus. About three centuries ago a disaster had resulted to a British expedition against the Spaniards, worthy of mention at the present time. The expedition had originally been directed agai
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sumner, Charles 1811- (search)
s unjustifiable, according to the principles of international law. His voice was heard frequently during the war in defence of the national policy, and in 1865 he pronounced a eulogy on President Lincoln. In April, 1869, his speech on American claims on England caused great excitement and indignation in Great Britain, where it was supposed to threaten war and an attempt to excite popular feeling against that country. In the same year his opposition to the scheme for the annexation of Santo Domingo to the United States brought him into collision with President Grant, and led to Sumner's removal from the chairmanship of the committee on foreign relations in March, 1870. He afterwards separated from the Republican party, and supported (1872) for the Presidency the nominee of the Liberal Republicans and Democratic party—Horace Greeley. He opposed General Grant's renomination, and at a convention of Democrats and Liberal Republicans held at Worcester in September, 1872, he was nomina
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