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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
Mexico, and the navy authorities resolved to employ their time with the capture of Mazatlan and Guaymas. Lower California had already been occupied by two companies of Stevenson's regiment, under Lieutenant-Colonel Burton, who had taken post at La Paz, and a small party of sailors was on shore at San Josef, near Cape San Lucas, detached from the Lexington, Lieutenant-Commander Bailey. The orders for this occupation were made by General Kearney before he left, in pursuance of instructions fromay for our board. Some time in September, 1848, the official news of the treaty of peace reached us, and the Mexican War was over. This treaty was signed in May, and came to us all the way by land by a courier from Lower California, sent from La Paz by Lieutenant-Colonel Burton. On its receipt, orders were at once made for the muster-out of all of Stevenson's regiment, and our military forces were thus reduced to the single company of dragoons at Los Angeles, and the one company of artiller
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
ing is a table of the chiefs of the United States embassies and legations in foreign countries on Jan. 1, 1901 Argentine republic. William P. Lord, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Buenos Ayres. Austria-Hungary. Addison C. Harris, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Vienna. Belgium. Lawrence Townsend, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Brussels. Bolivia. George H. Bridgman, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, La Paz. Brazil. Charles Page Bryan, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Rio de Janeiro. Chile. Henry L. Wilson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Santiago. China. Edwin H. Conger, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Peking. Colombia. Charles Burdett Hart, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Bogota. Costa Rica. William L. Merry, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, San Jose. Denmark. Laurits S.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
7, 1858 Convention of Completing treaty of 1858BrusselsMay 20, 1863 Treaty of To extinguish Scheldt duesBrusselsJuly 20, 1863 Convention of NaturalizationBrusselsNov. 16, 1868 Convention of Trade-marksBrusselsDec. 20, 1868 Convention of ExtraditionWashingtonMar. 19, 1874 Treaty of Commerce and navigationWashingtonMar. 8, 1875 Convention of Consular rightsWashingtonMar. 9, 1880 Convention of Trade-marksWashingtonApril 7, 1884 Bolivia: Treaty of Peace, friendship, commerce, navigationLa PazMay 13, 1858 Principal treaties and conventions of the United States with other powers—Continued. Foreign Power and Object of Treaty.Where Concluded.Date. Borneo: Convention of Peace, friendship, good understandingBruniJune 23, 1850 Brazil: Treaty of Peace and amityRio de JaneiroDec. 12, 1828 Convention of Satisfying U. S. claimsRio de JaneiroJan. 27, 1849 Convention of Trade-marksRio de JaneiroSept. 24, 1878 Brunswick and Luxemburg: Convention of Rights of citizensWashingtonAug.
coca, in general use among the Indians who inhabit the elevated plains among the Andes, is a stimulating narcotic, consisting of the dried leaves of Erythrosylon coca, in combination with a peculiar alkaline substance called clipta. Provided with a sufficient supply of this drug, an Indian will make an arduous journey of several days' duration without food. Its habitual use is said to be attended with effects analogous to those of opium. The plant is largely grown in the province of La Paz, in Bolivia, forming an important source of wealth to the inhabitants. A German authority, Von Bibra, in his Preface to Die narkotischen Genuss-Mittel und der Mensch (Man and the Use of Narcotics), assumes the following: Coffee leaves, in the form of infusions, are used by 2,000,000 of human beings; Paraguay tea is consumed by 10,000,000; coca by as many; betel is chewed by 100,000,000; chicory, either pure or mixed with coffee, by 40,000,000; cacao, either as chocolate or in some other form,