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James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 3: the man. (search)
ndence --we will see how it was incarnated when we find the old man and his sons in Kansas and Virginia. One of his favorite verses was, says a daughter, Count that day lost whose low-descending sun Views from thy hand no worthy action done. Here, although in advance of the time, two incidents may be related, which show how the ideas of the Bible interpenetrated his whole being. I asked him, says a child, how he felt when he left the eleven slaves, taken from Missouri, safe in Canada? His answer was, Lord, permit now thy servant to die in peace, for mine eyes have seen thy salvation. I could not brook the idea that any ill should befall them, or they be taken back to slavery. The arm of Jehovah protected us. The next anecdote, related since the old man's captivity, by a distinguished citizen of Pennsylvania, is no less characteristic: He has elements of character, which, under circumstances favorable to their proper development and right direction, would hav
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
ndence --we will see how it was incarnated when we find the old man and his sons in Kansas and Virginia. One of his favorite verses was, says a daughter, Count that day lost whose low-descending sun Views from thy hand no worthy action done. Here, although in advance of the time, two incidents may be related, which show how the ideas of the Bible interpenetrated his whole being. I asked him, says a child, how he felt when he left the eleven slaves, taken from Missouri, safe in Canada? His answer was, Lord, permit now thy servant to die in peace, for mine eyes have seen thy salvation. I could not brook the idea that any ill should befall them, or they be taken back to slavery. The arm of Jehovah protected us. The next anecdote, related since the old man's captivity, by a distinguished citizen of Pennsylvania, is no less characteristic: He has elements of character, which, under circumstances favorable to their proper development and right direction, would hav
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Kagi unfolds the great plan. (search)
or obvious reasons, give the full details. A full account of the convention in Canada was made, as well as of the organization, its extent and objects, thereby effec bands, which, under the general command of John Brown, were to be composed of Canadian refugees, and the Virginia slaves who would join them. A different time of thipated, after the first blow had been struck, that, by the aid of the free and Canadian negroes who would join them, they could inspire confidence in the slaves, and tention was expressed of gathering a large body of slaves, and removing them to Canada. On the contrary, Kagi clearly stated, in answer to my inquiries, that the desion indicated, and from his own personal knowledge, and with the assistance of Canadian negroes who had escaped from those States, they had arranged a general plan ofspeedily and constantly reinforced; first, by the arrival of those men, who, in Canada, were anxiously looking and praying for the time of deliverance, and then by t
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 2: some shadows before. (search)
or obvious reasons, give the full details. A full account of the convention in Canada was made, as well as of the organization, its extent and objects, thereby effec bands, which, under the general command of John Brown, were to be composed of Canadian refugees, and the Virginia slaves who would join them. A different time of thipated, after the first blow had been struck, that, by the aid of the free and Canadian negroes who would join them, they could inspire confidence in the slaves, and tention was expressed of gathering a large body of slaves, and removing them to Canada. On the contrary, Kagi clearly stated, in answer to my inquiries, that the desion indicated, and from his own personal knowledge, and with the assistance of Canadian negroes who had escaped from those States, they had arranged a general plan ofspeedily and constantly reinforced; first, by the arrival of those men, who, in Canada, were anxiously looking and praying for the time of deliverance, and then by t
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 4: Exodus. (search)
a do? Jim, who was driving an ox team, supposed to belong to the estate, asked one of the liberators, How far is it to Canada? Twenty-five hundred miles. Twenty-five hundred! Laws-a-massa! Twenty-five hundred miles! No get dar 'fore springerty in Kansas as a father. He had a company of twelve colored people, (who I only guess were once slaves,) en route for Canada, where I trust they are safe. To me he is an historic character. In the family, simple-hearted as a child, he narrates and because I regard it as necessary. The party reached Detroit on the 12th of March, and immediately crossed over to Canada. There, free children of the God of the oppressed, the old warrior of the Lord left the people he had snatched from the he other five are living about nine miles in the country. These make the twelve persons taken by Brown last January into Canada. As various reports are afloat concerning them, I wish to inform all parties that those living here are very industrious
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: assembling to conspire. (search)
zation. He issued a written circular, which he sent to various persons in the United States and Canada. The circular, as near as I can recollect, reads as follows: Chatham, May--, 1859. Mr.-- Deed States, whose names I do not now remember. Most of the delegates to the Convention were from Canada. After the Constitution was adopted, the members took their oath to support it. It was then sighe members of our company. Men and money had both been promised from Chatham and other parts of Canada. When the Convention broke up, news was received that Colonel H. Forbes, who had joined in the mBrown, however, started in a day or two for the East. Kagi, I think, went to some other town in Canada to set up the type, and to get the Constitution printed, which he completed before he returned ts was not extradition into the North, but emancipation in the South, - not to run off negroes to Canada, but to free them in Virginia, and to keep them there,--the Constitution adopted at this time is
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 6: making ready. (search)
Chapter 6: making ready. From the 16th of March, when John Brown was in Canada, up to the 16th of October, when he conquered Virginia,--a period of eight months,--it would neither be prudent nor just to trace his movements too minutely; and I do not propose to do so now. From the 20th to the 30th of March, he was at Cleveland, with Kagi. An incident of this residence is thus related by Wendell Phillips: Prudence, skill, courage, thrift, knowledge of his time, knowledge of his opponed of it is exceedingly imperfect. Such as it is, here it is: John Brown's speech. He prefaced his remarks by saying that he had called for an admission fee that he might use in place of money he had expended upon the slaves on their way to Canada. He remarked that since his last return to Kansas he had had no fight with the pro-slavery ruffians, although he had been threatened abundantly. He wished to say that he had never lifted a finger towards any one whom he did not know was a viole
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 7: the blow struck. (search)
satisfactory reasons, he determined to strike the blow that was to strike the Slave System to its foundations, on the night of the 17th. One of the men who fought at Harper's Ferry gave me as the chief reason for tie precipitate movement, that there was a Judas whom they suspected in their midst. That the reasons were just and important, the prudence that John Brown had always hitherto manifested satisfactorily proves. But this decision, however necessary, was unfortunate; for the men from Canada, Kansas, New England, and the neighboring Free States, who had been told to be prepared for the event on the 24th of October, and were ready to do their duty at Harper's Ferry at that time, were unable to join their Captain at this earlier period. Many, who started to join the Liberators, halted half way; for the blow had already been struck, and their Captain made a captive. Had there been no precipitation, the mountains of Virginia, to-day, would have been peopled with free blacks, pro
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 10: spoils of war. (search)
n the affair, printed constitutions and by-laws of an organization showing or indicating ramifications in various States of the Union. In this carpet bag were found various unimportant notes, from prominent persons in different States ; letters to J. Henrie, meaning Kagi; and Friend Isaac, meaning Captain Brown-- referring chiefly to the old man's Kansas work ; brief entries, in journals, of subscriptions received, and journeys made, and hardships endured in Iowa, the Eastern States, and Canada; copies of the Constitution, and of books of military tactics, with numerous receipts and bills for stock and provisions purchased for the war of liberation. In the mean time, now that the fight was over, the valiant Virginians flocked to Harper's Ferry. Governor Wise came down by the midday train, and, after ridiculing the people, visited the prisoners. The interview lasted several hours. None but the bitterest enemies of the Liberators were present during this confronting of the repr
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 11: the political inquisitors. (search)
own rescue. Of course, so far as I had any influence at all, I was disposed to justify the Oberlin people for rescuing the slave, because I have myself forcibly taken slaves from bondage. I was concerned in taking eleven slaves from Missouri to Canada, last winter. I think that I spoke in Cleveland before the Convention. I do not know that I had any conversation with any of the Oberlin rescuers. I was sick part of the time I was in Ohio. I had the ague. I was part of the 41me in Ashtabullies, and the community at large. Mr. V. Did you not shoot a negro on the bridge, or did not some of your party? Capt. B. I knew nothing of the shooting of the negro, (Heywood.) Mr. V. What time did you commence your organization over in Canada? Capt. B. It occurred about two years ago. If I remember right, it was, I think, in 1858. Mr. V. Who was the secretary? Capt. B. That I would not tell if I recollected; but I do not remember. I think the officers were elected in May, 18
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