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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 166 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 18 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Benin , set foorth by Master John Newton, and Master John Bird Marchants of London in the yeere 1590 with a ship called the Richard of Arundell of the burthen of one hundreth tunnes, and a small pinnesse, in which voyage Master James Welsh was chiefe Maister. (search)
ree and twentieth the Northeast part of the Island of Corvo bare off us East and by South sixe leagues off. The 17 of September we met with a ship of Plimouth that came out of the West Indies, but she could tell us no newes. The next day we had sight of another sayle, this day also one of our company named M. Wood died. The 23 we spake with the Dragon of my Lord of Cumberland, whereof Master Ivie was Maister. The second of October we met with a ship of Newcastle which came from Newfoundland , and out of her we had 300 couple of Newland fish. The 6 we had sight of Sillie, and with raine and winde we were forced to put into S. Maries sound, where we staied all night, and 4 dayes after. The 11 we set saile againe, and comming out had three fadom upon the barre at a high water, then we lay out Southeast, through Crow-sand, and shortly after we had sight of the lands end, and at ten of the clocke we were thwart of the Lysart. The 13 we were put into Dartmouth , and ther
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage of the right honorable George Erle of Cumberland to the Azores , &c. Written by the excellent Mathematician and Enginier master Edward Wright. (search)
nd another of Weymouth stayed ryding at anker before the Towne, to take in our provision. This shippe of Weymouth came to us the day before, and had taken a rich Prize (as it was reported) worth sixteene thousand pound, which brought us newes that the West-Indian Fleete was not yet come, but would come very shortly. But we with the Victorie put off to sea, and upon Saturday the fourth of October, we tooke a French shippe of Saint Malo (a citie of the unholy league) loden with fish from Newfoundland : which had beene in so great a tempest, that she was constrayned to cut her mayne mast overboord for her safetie, and was now comming to Graciosa , to repaire her selfe. But so hardly it befell her, that she did not onely not repaire her former losses, but lost all that remayned unto us. The chiefe of her men we tooke into our ship, and sent some of our men, mariners, and souldiers into her to bring her into England. Upon the Sunday following at night, all our promised provision was
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
r the maner of Englishmen in Westminster pallace, which that time I could not discerne from Englishmen, til I was learned what they were, but as for speach, I heard none of them utter one word. A briefe extract concerning the discoverie of Newfoundland , taken out of the booke of M. Robert Thorne, to doctor Leigh , &c. I REASON, that as some sickenesses are hereditarie, so this inclination or desire of this discovery I inherited from my father, which with another marchant of Bristol named as in vaine: The water about this place was very blacke and thicke like to a filthy standing poole, we sounded and had ground in 120. fathoms. While the Captaine was rowing to the shoare, our men sawe woods upon the rocks like to the rocks of Newfoundland , but I could not discerne them, yet it might be so very well: for we had wood floting upon the coast every day, and the Mooneshine tooke up a tree at Sea not farre from the coast being sixtie foote of length and foureteene handfuls about, hav
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe extract concerning the discoverie of Newfoundland , taken out of the booke of M. Robert Thorne, to doctor Leigh , &c. (search)
A briefe extract concerning the discoverie of Newfoundland , taken out of the booke of M. Robert Thorne, to doctor Leigh , &c. I REASON, that as some sickenesses are hereditarie, so this inclination or desire of this discovery I inherited from my father, which with another marchant of Bristol named Hugh Eliot, were the discoverers of the Newfound-lands; of the which there is no doubt (as nowe plainely appeareth) if the Mariners would then have bene ruled, and followed their Pilots minde, but the lands of the West Indies, from whence all the golde commeth, had bene ours; for all is one coast as by the Card appeareth, and is aforesaid.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage of M. John Davis, undertaken in June 1585. for the discoverie of the Northwest passage, Written by M. John Janes Marchant, sometimes servant to the worshipfull Master William Sanderson. (search)
wo miles, hee found so much yce, that hee could not get to land by any meanes. Here our mariners put to their lines to see if they could get any fish, because there were so many seales upon the coast, and the birds did beate upon the water, but all was in vaine: The water about this place was very blacke and thicke like to a filthy standing poole, we sounded and had ground in 120. fathoms. While the Captaine was rowing to the shoare, our men sawe woods upon the rocks like to the rocks of Newfoundland , but I could not discerne them, yet it might be so very well: for we had wood floting upon the coast every day, and the Mooneshine tooke up a tree at Sea not farre from the coast being sixtie foote of length and foureteene handfuls about, having the roote upon it: After this the Captaine came aboord, the weather being very calme and faire we bent our course toward the South, with intent to double the land. The 23. we coasted the land which did lie Eastnortheast and Westsouthwest. T
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumptgreat opening, betweene the North parts of Newfoundland , and the countrey lately called by her Maj of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in wing: to wit, That after their arrivall in Newfoundland , and having bene there certaine dayes at aer for licence to traffique into Iseland & Newfoundland , made in An. 2. Edwardi sexti. FORASMUCH the adventures and journeys into Iseland, Newfoundland , Ireland , and other places commodious foreport of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578.ove men of power, to redeeme the people of Newfoundland and those parts from out of the captiver touching the sundry navies that come to Newfoundland , or Terra nova, for fish: you shal understmatters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so cold
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the two ships, whereof the one was called the Dominus vobiscum, set out the 20 day of May in the 19 yere of king Henry the eight, and in the yere of our Lord God 1527. for the discoverie of the North partes. (search)
n , which was a great Mathematician, and a man indued with wealth, did much advance the action, and went therein himselfe in person, but what his name was I cannot learne of any. And further they told me that one of the ships was called The Dominus vobiscum, which is a name likely to be given by a religious man of those dayes: and that sayling very farre Northwestward, one of the ships was cast away as it entred into a dangerous gulph, about the great opening, betweene the North parts of Newfoundland , and the countrey lately called by her Majestie, Meta Incognita. Whereupon the other ship shaping her course towards Cape Briton, and the coastes of Arambec, and oftentimes putting their men on land to search the state of those unknowen regions, returned home about the beginning of October, of the yere aforesayd. And thus much (by reason of the great negligence of the writers of those times, who should have used more care in preserving of the memories of the worthy actes of our nation,)
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8. (search)
The voyage of M. Hore and divers other gentlemen, to Newfoundland , and Cape Briton, in the yere 1536 and in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8. ONE master Hore of London, a man of goodly stature and of great courage, and given to the studie of Cosmographie, in the 28 yere of king Henry the 8 and in the yere of our Lord 1536 encouraged divers Gentlemen and others, being assisted by the kings favour and good countenance, to accompany him in a voyage of discoverie upon the Northwest parts of Americed some, and tooke them for no bad foode. M. Oliver Dawbeny, which (as it is before mentioned) was in this voyage, and in the Minion, told M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple these things following: to wit, That after their arrivall in Newfoundland , and having bene there certaine dayes at ancre, and not having yet seene any of the naturall people of the countrey, the same Dawbeney walking one day on the hatches, spied a boate with Savages of those parts, rowing downe the Bay toward them
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An act against the exaction of money or any other thing by any officer for licence to traffique into Iseland & Newfoundland , made in An. 2. Edwardi sexti. (search)
An act against the exaction of money or any other thing by any officer for licence to traffique into Iseland & Newfoundland , made in An. 2. Edwardi sexti. FORASMUCH as within these few yeeres now last past, there have bene levied, perceived & taken by certaine of the officers of the Admiraltie, of such Marchants, and fishermen as have used and practised the adventures and journeys into Iseland, Newfoundland , Ireland , and other places commodious for fishing, and the getting of fish, in and uNewfoundland , Ireland , and other places commodious for fishing, and the getting of fish, in and upon the Seas or otherwise, by way of Marchants in those parties, divers great exactions, as summes of money, doles or shares of fish, and such other like things, to the great discouragement & hinderance of the same Marchants and fishermen, and to no little dammage of the whole common wealth, and thereof also great complaints have bene made, & informations also yerely to the kings Majesties most honourable councell: for reformation whereof, and to the intent also that the sayd Marchants and fish
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter written to M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, conteining a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578. (search)
A letter written to M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, conteining a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578. MASTER HAKLUYT, after most heartie commendations, with like thankes for yo, I trust God hath made you an instrument to increase the number, and to moove men of power, to redeeme the people of Newfoundland and those parts from out of the captivitie of that spirituall Pharao, the devill. Now to answer some part of your letter touching the sundry navies that come to Newfoundland , or Terra nova, for fish: you shal understand that some fish not neere the other by 200. leagues, and therefore the certaintie is not knowen; and some yeres come many more then other nd timber. Nowe to let these merrie tales passe, and to come to earnest matters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of
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