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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), La Tour, Charles -1656 (search)
La Tour, Charles -1656 Proprietary governor. When Acadia, or Nova Scotia, was returned to the French (1632), it was apportioned into provinces, under proprietary governors. To Razille, commander-in-chief, was granted the southern portion of th La Tour now came back from the wilderness, vindicated his character before his sovereign, was made lieutenantgovernor of Acadia, and again recovered his fort at St. John. He married the widow of his rival, and inherited his shattered estate, and prosperity once more smiled upon the Huguenot; for his claim to extensive territorial rights in Acadia, by virtue of Sir William Alexander's grant to his father, was recognized in 1656. He soon afterwards died. Acadia had then passed once more into td upon the Huguenot; for his claim to extensive territorial rights in Acadia, by virtue of Sir William Alexander's grant to his father, was recognized in 1656. He soon afterwards died. Acadia had then passed once more into the hands of the English.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lescarbot, Marc 1590- (search)
Lescarbot, Marc 1590- Author; born in Vervins, France, in 1590. When, in 1606, Poutrincourt, who founded Port Royal, in Acadia, returned from France with a company of artisans and laborers, he was accompanied by Lescarbot, who had then become known as a lawyer, poet, and writer of a History of New France, published in 1609. He came to assist Poutrincourt in establishing his colony on a firm basis. While Champlain and De Monts were looking for a milder climate farther south, Lescarbot took charge of the fort. With great energy he planted, builded, and wrote rhymes, and infused into his subordinates some of his own energy. When Champlain returned, he was greeted by a theatrical masque, composed by the poet, in which Neptune and his Tritons welcomed the mariner. The dreary winter that followed was enlivened by the establishment of an Order of good times by Lescarbot, the duties of the members consisting in the preparation of good cheer daily for the table. In the spring the co
ns took the oath of allegiance to the Bay State. The latter province then assumed supreme rule in Maine, and continued it until the restoration of the Stuarts (1660), when Charles II., on the petition of the heirs of Gorges, sent over a commission to re-establish the authority of the grantees. Massachusetts. after long resistance, purchased the interests (1677) of the claimants for £12,000 sterling. In 1674 the Dutch conquered the territory eastward from the Penobscot, including that of Acadia and Nova Scotia; and in 1676 Cornelius Steenwyck was appointed governor of the conquered territory by the Dutch West India Company. Settlers from Boston soon afterwards expelled the Dutch. Meanwhile the horrors of King Philip's War had extended to that region, and in the space of three months 100 persons were murdered. Then came disputes arising out of the claims Lumbering in Maine. of the Duke of York (to whom Charles II. had given New Netherland) to the country between the Kennebec
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Montreal, massacre at (search)
his event threw the whole French colony into consternation. It was reported that 1,000 of the French were slain during the invasion, besides twenty-six carried into captivity and burned alive. It was this massacre that the French sought to avenge the next year, when Frontenac sent into the Mohawk country the mongrel party that destroyed Schenectady, and two others which attacked Salmon Falls and Casco, in Maine. Sir William Phipps having been successful in an expedition against Port Royal, Acadia, in 1690, a plan for the conquest of Canada was speedily arranged. A fleet under Phipps proceeded against Quebec, and colonial land forces were placed under the supreme command of Fitz-John Winthrop, son of Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut. Milborne, son-in-law of Leisler, undertook, as commissary, to provide and forward subsistence for the march. Colonel Schuyler with a party of Mohawks, the van of the expedition, pushed forward towards the St. Lawrence, but was repulsed by Frontenac (A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mount Desert Island. (search)
esuit leader, took out and destroyed his commission, and then, pretending that they were within English jurisdiction, without authority, he turned more than a dozen of the little colony loose upon the ocean in an open boat, to seek Port Royal, in Acadia. Two fishing vessels picked them up and carried them to France. The remainder were carried to Virginia, and there lodged in prison and badly treated. Argall's conduct was approved in Virginia, and he was sent back to destroy ail the settlementission, and then, pretending that they were within English jurisdiction, without authority, he turned more than a dozen of the little colony loose upon the ocean in an open boat, to seek Port Royal, in Acadia. Two fishing vessels picked them up and carried them to France. The remainder were carried to Virginia, and there lodged in prison and badly treated. Argall's conduct was approved in Virginia, and he was sent back to destroy ail the settlements in Acadia. See Acadia, and Argall, Samuel.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of New Hampshire, (search)
son was a man of action, and well acquainted with all matters pertaining to settlements. He and Gorges obtained a grant of land (Aug. 10, 1622) extending from the Merrimac to the Kennebec, and inland to the St. Lawrence They named the territory the Province of Laconia; and to forestall the French settlements in the east, and secure the country to the Protestants, Gorges secured a grant from Sir William Alexander of the whole mainland eastward of the St Croix River, excepting a small part of Acadia. Mason had already obtained a grant of land (March 2, 1621) extending from Salem to the mouth of the Merrimac, which he called Mariana; and the same year a colony of fishermen seated themselves at Little Harbor, on the Piscataqua, just below the site of Portsmouth. Other fishermen settled on the site of Dover (1623), and there were soon several fishing-stations, but no permanent settlement until 1629, when Mason built a house near the mouth of the Piscataqua, and called the place Portsmo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Netherland. (search)
against the Dutch on their own account. At another meeting (September, 1653) the commissioners, believing they were called by God to make present war on Ninegret, ordered 250 men to be raised for that purpose. The Massachusetts court again interfered, and prevented war. Cromwell, however, sent three ships and a few troops to attack New Netherland, but before they reached America the war with Holland was over, and the expedition, under John Leverett and Robert Sedgwick, proceeded to capture Acadia (q. v.) from La Tour, who laid claim to it because of a grant made to his father by Sir William Alexander. Late in August, 1664, a land and naval armament, commanded by Col. Richard Nicolls, anchored in New Utrecht Bay, just inside of the present Coney Island There Nicolls was joined by Governor Winthrop, of Connecticut, several magistrates of that colony, and two leading men from Boston. Governor Stuyvesant was at Fort Orange (Albany) when news of this armament reached him. He hastened
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Sweden, founding of (search)
d its territorial rights secured by a patent. In the year 1620 a dispute arose between them about the fisheries at Cape Cod, when a new patent was given. The Bristol Company, which received an accession of some persons of rank and distinction, changed its name to that of the Plymouth Council, and obtained a right to all the lands lying above the 40th degree up to the 48th degree of north latitude, which was three degrees farther north than the former grant, and included the greater part of Acadia, or New Scotland, and also King Gustaf Adolph. extended westward from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean: all this was included in New England. The rest remained under Virginia. About the same time the Hollanders undertook to steal into these American harbors. They took a fancy to the shores of the bay called by the Indians Menahados, and the river Mohaan. Evidently, the Mohawk, although we do not anywhere else find that river so called. The connection would indicate the Hudson Ri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Penobscot. (search)
Penobscot. The Company of New France, which had purchased Sir W. Alexander's rights to territory in Nova Scotia through Stephen, Lord of La Tour, in 1630, conveyed the territory on the banks of the river St. John to this nobleman in 1635. Rossellon, commander of a French fort in Acadia, sent a French manof-war to Penobscot and took possession of the Plymouth trading-house there, with all its goods. A vessel was sent from Plymouth to recover the property. The French fortified the place, and were so strongly intrenched that the expedition was abandoned. The Plymouth people never afterwards recovered their interest at Penobscot. The first permanent English occupation of the region of the Penobscot—to which the French laid claim—was acquired in 1759, when Governor Pownall, of Massachusetts, with the consent of the legislature, caused a fort to be built on the western bank of the Penobscot (afterwards Fort Knox), near the village of Prospect, which was named Fort Pownall. An
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Phipps, Sir William 1631- (search)
ston in 1673, where he learned to read and write. In 1684 he went to England to procure means to recover a treasureship wrecked near the Bahamas. With a ship furnished by the government, he was unsuccessful; but with another furnished by the Duke of Albemarle, he recovered treasure to the amount of about $1,400,000, of which his share amounted to about $75,000. The King knighted him, and he was appointed high sheriff of New England. In 1690, in command of a fleet, he captured Port Royal (Acadia), and late in the same year he led an unsuccessful expedition against Quebec. Phipps went to England in 1692 to solicit another expedition against Canada. There he was appointed captain-general and governor of Massachusetts under a new royal charter, just issued, and he returned in May of that year, bringing the charter with him. In 1694 he was summoned to England to answer charges preferred against him, and there he died of a malignant fever, Feb. 18, 1695. Sir William was a member of the
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