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The Daily Dispatch: March 27, 1861., [Electronic resource], Collection of Customs in the Confederated States. (search)
d. It seems, also, that he received it very badly, if he did not reject it outright. It seems to us that this is very bad policy. Poland proper numbers 15,000,000 of souls. It is divided between Russia, Prussia, and Austria. It borders upon Hungary, which again comes down to the very gates of Venitia. Austria is tumbling — Hungary is a perfect volcano — and Venitia is kept down by military force. Back of these lie France and Italy, themselves revolutionary powers, full of the smoulderinHungary is a perfect volcano — and Venitia is kept down by military force. Back of these lie France and Italy, themselves revolutionary powers, full of the smouldering life of subdued volcanoes. Poland cannot but be moved by the earthquakes in her neighborhood, and it must be to the last degree dangerous to refuse her that boon which all these States so ardently desire. Acknowledged Nationality is the great desire of the European mind at present. A nation cannot be killed off by violence. Like the heads of the hydra, Nationality is multiform, and it will spring up when cut down, in spite of fire and sw
me of the nation.--The signature of Kossuth, and the royal arms of Hungary, are appended. Of course, these notes are intended for circulatioposes and says," &c., &c., that the Emperor of Austria, as King of Hungary, has the exclusive power of issuing such notes, intended for circulation as money in Hungary, and also the sole right to authorize the affixing of the royal arms of Hungary to any document; and "the deponentHungary to any document; and "the deponent has no doubt that Louis Kossuth intended to use the same to promote revolution and disorder in Hungary." In order to pronounce a definiHungary." In order to pronounce a definite judgment in this case, the right of the Emperor of Austria to the crown of Hungary must be decided.--The defendant will undoubtedly deny tHungary must be decided.--The defendant will undoubtedly deny that right; the present Emperor has never been crowned King of Hungary; never taken the oath to the Hungarian Constitution; and a court of lawHungary; never taken the oath to the Hungarian Constitution; and a court of law requires every fact to be proven by the most incontrovertible evidence. It would be strange to see the legitimacy of Austrian rule made a s