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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, How to worke comming through the olde Chanell, if you be not minded to goe over the Pracellas or shoalds. (search)
rds of the Chanell, you shall see the firme land of Cuba , and other markes; and among the rest, a round hamocke, which you may easily know. It is called Alcane de Barasoga. And from thence to Savano and to Basquo is 6. leagues, and likewise Havana 6. leagues. And from thence to crosse under the Fort is 45. leagues. And stirre hence upon your course aforesaid. And if you have gone from Barasoga 30. leagues, you shall see none of the Flats of Mecala: And give them a bredth off two or three ght close by it, you shall not see what land it is, till it be day: and in the Morning you shall set your course as is aforesayd untill you see the shoald, and in seeing it, you may stirre on your course as is above mentioned, untill you come to Havana . For to set your course from the point of Mance to Caio Romano, when you are North and South with the point of Mance, you shall stirre thence West Northwest, until you thinke you be Northeast and Southwest with the hill of Hama . And this hil
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A principal ruttier conteining most particular directions to saile from S. Lucar in Andaluzia by the Isles of the Canaries, the small Isles called Las Antillas, along the South parts of the Isles of S. Juan de Puerto rico, Hispaniola and Cuba : and from Cabo de Corrientes, or Cabo de S. Anton without and within the litle Isles called Los Alacranes, to the port of S. Juan de Ullua in Nueva Espanna: and the course from thence backe againe by Havana , and through the Chanell of Bahama to Spaine: together with the speciall markes of all the Capes, Islands, and other places by the way; and a briefe declaration of their latitudes and longitudes. (search)
urope .IF you depart from S. Juan de Ullua to Havana , you must stir away Northeast until you bringvana .IF you depart from The Tortugas towards Havana with a fresh winde, you must stir away SouthwCape: and from Baya honda or The deepe bay to Havana , all the coast is full of high and lowe hilleNote, that if you overpasse the harborough of Havana to the Eastward, or if the current hath set yf sande called Barrancas. If you will recover Havana , go along the coast close by the lande, for tcleane ground. The course from Havana to Spaine.IF you will saile from Havana to SHavana to Spaine, you must stirre away Northeast, till you come to the head of The Martires called La Cabeza dortheast part of S. Juan de Puerto rico, unto Havana , by the North side of the Isle of Hispaniola,h one from another. Item from Cayo de Cruz to Havana , if it be by day, stir away West Northwest; bmano. Likewise from thence on the side of Havana you shall see certaine hilles which shewe to [8 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The course from Sant Juan de Ullua in the bay of Mexico to Spaine in Europe . (search)
The course from Sant Juan de Ullua in the bay of Mexico to Spaine in Europe .IF you depart from S. Juan de Ullua to Havana , you must stir away Northeast until you bring your selfe in 25. degrees, and from thence you must stir away East from the little Islands called Las Tortugas, untill you have the sounding of them; and if you finde white sande very small, you shall bee East and West with them, and if your sounding bee shellie ground and periwinkles, or small shelles or skales, then shall you be Northeast and Southwest, and the shelles or skales must bee red, and if at some time you take up blacke sande, then are you North and South with the sayd Tortugas.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The course from The Tortugas toward Havana . (search)
The course from The Tortugas toward Havana .IF you depart from The Tortugas towards Havana with a fresh winde, you must stir away SouHavana with a fresh winde, you must stir away Southwest: and if it be faire weather, and a small gale of winde, then stir South, that the current may not draw you in, nor set you too much tos farre as the sayde Cape: and from Baya honda or The deepe bay to Havana , all the coast is full of high and lowe hilles, which they call Lahigh hill which is called El pan de Cabannas. And if you fall with Havana , you shall see on the Southwest side an hill called La meza de Marloafe that is called El pan de Cabannas. You must note, that about Havana it is all lowe land even with the sea, till you come to Mesa de Mang your selfe North and South, you shall be with the harborough of Havana , and then shall you soone perceive the tower that is upon the clifrth and South, you shall be with the harborough of Havana , and then shall you soone perceive the tower that is upon the cliffes of Havana .
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Markes of the haven or port called Puerto de Marien. (search)
f the rockes and shelves, and when you are within, then borrow on the East shoare, and leave the other side, and so shall you enter safe: and from this place to Havana is all lowe lande. Note, that if you overpasse the harborough of Havana to the Eastward, or if the current hath set you past it by meanes of calmes, then shall yHavana to the Eastward, or if the current hath set you past it by meanes of calmes, then shall you perceive at full sea upon the coast certaine broken places like the enterances of harbours, because the lande is lowe; and comming neere the shoare you shall see in some places of the coast Playas or strandes of sande which shewe like unto Chipiona: and looking Eastward along the sea coast, you shall see a round loafe which is ch is called El pan de Matanzas : and also you shall perceive in certaine places round white heapes of sande called Barrancas. If you will recover Havana , go along the coast close by the lande, for the current runneth very swift in the chanell, and there is no feare but of that which you may see; for all the coast is cleane ground.
The course from Havana to Spaine.IF you will saile from Havana to Spaine, you must stirre away Northeast, till you come to the head of The Martires called La Cabeza de los Martires. If it chance before you come to the said head, that the winde should chop up at North on you, then stand to the Eastward, untill you bring your selfe as farre ahead as Matanzas ; then cast about to the West, to discover the lande of The Martires, or of Florida , that the current may not set you on THavana to Spaine, you must stirre away Northeast, till you come to the head of The Martires called La Cabeza de los Martires. If it chance before you come to the said head, that the winde should chop up at North on you, then stand to the Eastward, untill you bring your selfe as farre ahead as Matanzas ; then cast about to the West, to discover the lande of The Martires, or of Florida , that the current may not set you on The Mimbres : and if by chance you see The Pan de Matanzas at ful sea, it hath these markes following. It is a round heape or loafe, and high withall, and on the Westerne side thereof, appeareth a rocke like to the head of a Tortoise: and betweene this Pan and the hilles of Seluco, there will appeare unto you a great broken lande, like as it were sunken places, and upon the East side of this Pan toward Punta de los Puercos it is all lowe lande, and you shall see no high lande at all: and being s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Now followeth the course and direction to saile from Passage on the Northeast part of S. Juan de Puerto rico, unto Havana , by the North side of the Isle of Hispaniola, and by The old chanell. (search)
Now followeth the course and direction to saile from Passage on the Northeast part of S. Juan de Puerto rico, unto Havana , by the North side of the Isle of Hispaniola, and by The old chanell.IF you depart from S. Juan de Puerto rico to seeke Cabo del Enganno, you must stirre away Westnorthwest, and so shall you see a round heape or loafe in the sea, which lieth on the Southwest side of the gulfe of Semana; and from thence it beginneth about the hill of the Cape del Enganno, & this is the mouth of the gulfe. And if it should be neere night when you see this lande, stir away Northwest with a small sayle, because of certaine rockes called Las Ovejas, or The Sheepe: and in the morning cast about to see the land to the Southwestward; and if when you see the land, it seemeth unto you a small island at full sea like a round mountaine, then is it The cape del Enganno: and from thence stir away West and by North toward Cabo Franco.
cel: and if you goe more a head coasting the Parcell, about fifteene leagues, you shall see three Islands full of trees, which are called Las Anguillas and all these three Islands beare North and South one from another. Item from Cayo de Cruz to Havana , if it be by day, stir away West Northwest; but if it be by night, then stir a point more to the Westward: and if in this course you chance to see the Parcell, feare not; for in the lowest water there are sixe fathomes; then cast about to the So lying Northeast and Southwest being all saddle-like: and bringing the poynt Southwest off you, you shall be in the middest of the chanell: and from thence you have as farre to Matanzas as to Cayo Romano. Likewise from thence on the side of Havana you shall see certaine hilles which shewe to be three, and ly Northeast and Southwest, and that on the Southwest is highest: they are called Las Sierras de Guana: and North and South from them lyeth a flat, which is called Cayo de Nicola, which
An advertizment.WHEN you shall passe this course, goe not out of sight of the Tortugas. And if you will goe from thence to Havana , having a faire winde, stir away Southwest because the current may not set you off: and if with a fresh winde and Northerly, then stir away Southerly.
ressed so dry, that there remaineth no moisture in it, they mingle and temper the same with water and so make cakes therof, which are very savory & good to eat, & this is all the bread which they have in those Ilands. There go from hence yerely into Spaine 7 or 8 ships at the least full fraighted with sugar & hides. Neere unto Hispaniola lyeth another greater Iland called Cuba , it is like unto Hispaniola, although there is not so much sugar. The principall towne of this Ilande is called Havana , which hath an excellent harborough belonging thereunto. The townesmen are very rich by reason of the fleetes that come from Nueva Espanna, and Tierra firma which touch there; for the safeguarde of which fleetes and of the towne it selfe there is a castle built neere the said harborough kept with Spanish souldiers; neither is there any castle or souldiers in all the Ilands but onely here. There is also another Iland inhabited with Spaniards called Boriquen or Sant Juan de Puerto rico. It is
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