Your search returned 26 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
s. These last are compensated entirely by the official and unofficial fees which they may from time to time collect. The highest salary paid is $7,500, and that amount is paid only at Seoul, Korea, where the consul-general is also minister resident, and consequently occupies a diplomatic position with all the expenses incident thereto. The consul-general at Athens, Bucharest, and Belgrade is paid $6,500. He is also envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to Greece, Rumania, and Servia, and serves in all the above offices for one and the same salary. The consul-general at Havana receives $6,000, and the consul-general at Melbourne $4,500. There are twelve offices where $5,000 are paid, viz.: Rio de Janeiro, Shanghai, Paris, Calcutta, Hong-Kong, Liverpool, London, Port au Prince, Rome, Teheran, Cairo, and Bangkok (where the consul is also minister resident); seven offices where $4,000 are paid, viz.: Panama, Berlin, Montreal, Honolulu, Kanagawa, Monrovia, and Mexico; seve
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Diplomatic service. (search)
illiam F. Powell, Charge d'affaires, Port au Prince. Ecuador. Archbald J. Sampson, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Quito. Egypt. John G. Long, Agent and Consul-General, Cairo. France. Horace Porter, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Paris. German Empire. Andrew D. White, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Berlin. Great Britain. Joseph H. Choate, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, London. Greece, Rumania, and Servia. Arthur S. Hardy, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Athens. Guatemala and Honduras. W. Godfrey Hunter, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Guatemala City. Haiti. William F. Powell, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Port au Prince. Italy. ————, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Rome. Japan. Alfred E. Buck, Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary, Tokio. Korea. Horace N. Allen, Minister Residen
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Peace conference, universal (search)
cultative arbitration in cases lending themselves thereto, with the object of preventing armed conflicts between nations; to come to an understanding with respect to the mode of applying these good offices, and to establish a uniform practice in using them. The following governments were represented: Austria-Hungary, Belgium, Bulgaria, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Greece, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Mexico, Montenegro, the Netherlands, Persia, Portugal, Rumania, Russia, Servia, Siam, Spain, Sweden and Norway, Switzerland, Turkey, and the United States of America. The United States were represented by the lion. Andrew D. White, ambassador to Berlin; the Hon. Seth Low, president of Columbia University; the Hon. Stanford Newel, minister to The Hague; Capt. Alfred T. Mahan, U. S. N.; Capt. William Crozier, U. S. A., and the Hon. Frederick W. Holls, of New York. At the opening of the conference, May 18, M. de Staal, the Russian ambassador, was elected President.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schuyler, Eugene 1840-1890 (search)
Schuyler, Eugene 1840-1890 Diplomatist; born in Ithaca, N. Y., Feb. 26, 1840; graduated at Yale College in 1859, and at the Columbia Law School in 1863; engaged in practice in 1863-66; was United States consul at Moscow in 1866-69; at Reval in 1869-70; secretary of the United States legation at St. Petersburg in 1870-76; at Constantinople in 1876-78; charge d'affaires at Bucharest in 1880-82; minister to Greece, Servia, and Rumania in 1882-84; and consul-general at Cairo from 1889 till his death. He contributed to magazines and wrote American diplomacy. He died in Cairo, Egypt, July 18, 1890.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
8 Zanzibar: Convention of Enlarging treaty with Muscat, 1833ZanzibarJuly 3, 1886 General conventions. Convention with Belgium, Brazil, Dominican Republic, France, Great Britain, Guatemala, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Salvador, Servia, Spain, Sweden, Swiss Confederation, and Tunis; conventions for the protection of industrial property; signed at ParisMar. 20, 1883 Convention with Belgium, Brazil, Italy, Portugal, Servia, Spain, and Switzerland, for exchange of official documeServia, Spain, and Switzerland, for exchange of official documents and literary publications; signed at BrusselsMar. 15, 1886 Convention with Germany, Great Britain and Ireland, general act for neutrality of Samoan Islands; signed at BerlinJune 14. 1889 Convention with foreign powers for an international union to publish customs tariffs; signed at Brussels,July 5, 1890 Convention with Great Britain tor an international commission to arrange adjustments of controversies between the United States and CanadaMay 30, 1898 treaties, Anglo-American
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
—a picturesque title, which has come down from the Middle Ages; and his dress is no less picturesque. I saw him in costume at the Court ball yesterday. He has lately, with the consent of his government, and at the request of Prince Milosch of Servia, been there to examine a tract of country believed previously to be rich in mineral wealth, some portions of which are supposed to have been mined by the Romans. Mr. Von Jordan and myself were invited to-day to hear him give some account of his The country is everywhere perfectly safe for travellers, but he had a guard of honor of thirty persons sent with him, besides all that was necessary for his civil purposes and his cuisine. He showed us a musical instrument on which the ladies of Servia play, very little more deserving the name than an African banjo, which it much resembled; and several pieces of the handiwork of the Princess Milosch and her maids, which were given him as parting presents. They consisted of handkerchiefs, glove
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
von, 122, 123, 127. Schultze, Dr., 70, 73 note, 80, 81 and note, 82, 121. Schurtz, Hofrath, 112. Schwabe, Dr., 58. Scilla, Prince, 212, 219. Scott, Anne, 283. Scott, Sir, Walter, 24, 275, 276, 290-284, 430; portrait of, 388, 389, 407. Scott, Sophia, 281, 283, 284. Scott, Walter, Jr., 284. Sedgwick, Professor, 271, 419, 420 note, 421. Segovia, Bishop of, 218. Segovia, visits, 218. Senior, Nassau William, 407, 412 and note, 451. Senonnes, Viscount de, 255, 262, 263. Servia, life in, 478. Seville, 237-241; Alcazar, 238, 240; Cathedral, 238, 239; people of, 239, 240. Seymour, Mr., 447. Shakespeare, study of, 394; Tieck's reading of, 473, 477, 482; Schlegel's translation of, 468, 483. Sharon, Mass., E. Billings (Mrs. E. Ticknor) born and keeps school in, 3. Sharp, Richard, Conversation, 55, 56. Shaw, William S., founder of the Boston Athenaeum, 8, 12. Shiel, 415. Siddons, Mrs., 55, 56, 66. Sierra Morena, 223. Silliman, Professor B., 14.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
. Scott, Sophia, I. 281, 283, 284. Scott, Walter, Jr., I. 284. Seaver, Mr., Mayor of Boston, II. 303. Secession, II. 430, 442, 446. Sedgwick, Professor, I. 271, 419, 420 note, 421, II. 156, 157, 176, 177, 178, 179. Segovia, visits, T. 218; Bishop of, 218. Senior, Nassau William, I. 407, 412 and note, 451, 1I. 145, 147, 151, 178, .325, 362, 363, 364, 366, 369, 371, 375, 380, 385. Senonnes, Viscount de, I. 255, 2-2, 263. Sermoneta. Duca di, II. 346 and note, 347, 348. Servia, life in, I. 478. Seville, I. 237-241; Alcazar, 238, 240; Cathedral, 238, 239; people of, 239, 240. Seymour, Mr., I. 447. Shakespeare, study of, I. 394; Tieck's reading of, 473, 477, 482; Schlegel's translation of, 468, 483 Sharon, Mass., E. Billings (Mrs. E. Ticknor), born and keeps school in, I. 3. Sharp, Richard, Conversation, I. 55, 56. Shaw, William S., founder of the Boston Athenaeum, 1. 8. 12. Shelburne, Lady, II. 371, 380. Shelburne, Lord, II. 147, 176. Shiel
lace the French fleet at Gaeta. Germany. It is said that the German Diet will refuse to recognize any representative from Sardinia, under the new Italian annexations to the Kingdom. The German army is said to be ready to meet any enemy. Austria. The Austrian Ministers have been ordered to put the new ordinance into effect immediately A provisional electoral law is to be adopted for Hungary. The Hungarian Diet assembles April 2d. The disquiet is increasing in Servia. China. The regular China mails had been telegraphed and would be due at London in time for the steamer Niagara. The terms of the treaty of peace provide, among other things, that all the important Chinese ports shall be opened, and inland foreign trade allowed. Chinese Ambassadors are to reside in England. Exchange rates had declined at Hong Kong 3-4 per cent. The Russian Ambassador at Pekin had ratified the convention confirming certain privileges on the Amoor, and ext
Very good! The Richmond Whig, a few days since, had the following capital bit at the Yankees: The Yankee papers call the Confederate States Secissia ot a bad appellation. What me would fit the Yankees? Servia, or the land of serfs, would not be far wide of the mark; but it would be doing injustice to the Turkish Province of that name, which, though enslaved did not perpetuate the folly of enplaving itself. That glory belongs to the Yankee alone.
1 2