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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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the Maine troops. headquarters Third division Heintzelman's corps, camp Berry, Barhamsville, Va., May 10. To His Excellency, Israel Washburn, Jr., Governor of Maine: sir: As Commanding General of this division, of which two of the Generals commanding brigades, (Gen. Jameson and Gen. Berry,) as well as two regiments, the Thir to enclose the report of Gen. D. B. Birney, who commanded the noble brigade, of which these two regiments form a part. Gen. Birney commands two New-York and two Maine regiments. It is peculiarly appropriate, after having rendered justice to the regiments and Colonels, to bring Gens. Jameson and Berry to the especial attention Gen. Berry, charged with the left wing of our line of battle, evinced a courage that might have been expected of him, (when, as Colonel of the Fourth regiment of Maine volunteers, he nearly saved the day at Bull Run,) and also a genius for war and a pertinacity in the fight that proved him fit for high command — for he was most s
the impetuous dash of our men the enemy could not resist, but gave way and were sent back much cut up and in disorder over the ground on which they advanced. This success gave us much advantage of position, by allowing the left centre of the brigade line to rest upon the woods, some eight hundred yards in advance of our first position, and at the same time affording us a crossfire upon any second attempt of the enemy upon our position. At this time I was reenforced by detachments from two Maine regiments, which being posted on my right in support of the Ninety-third Pennsylvania, gave me much additional strength. I was soon again reenforced by Captain----'s battery. I immediately placed it in battery in a favorable position to bear upon the rebel battery that had annoyed us with its fire in the beginning of the action. The battery at once opened fire upon them with fine effect, the spherical case-shot doing good execution in their teams and among their artillerymen. The rebel b
but another advance was out of the question. The enemy, on the other hand, seemed to be too much exhausted to attack. At this crisis Franklin came up with fresh troops and formed on the left. Slocum, commanding one division of the corps, was sent forward along the slopes lying under the first ranges of the rebel hills, while Smith with the other division was ordered to retake the corn-fields and woods which all day had been so hotly contested. It was done in the handsomest style. His Maine and Vermont regiments and the rest went forward on the run, and cheering as they went, swept like an avalanche through the corn-fields, fell upon the woods, cleared them in ten minutes, and held them. They were not again retaken. The field and its ghastly harvest which the Reaper had gathered in those fatal hours remained finally with us. Four times it had been lost and won. The dead are strewn so thickly that as you ride over it you cannot guide your horse's steps too carefully. Pale a
but another advance was out of the question. The enemy, on the other hand, seemed to be too much exhausted to attack. At this crisis Franklin came up with fresh troops and formed on the left. Slocum, commanding one division of the corps, was sent forward along the slopes lying under the first ranges of the rebel hills, while Smith with the other division was ordered to retake the corn-fields and woods which all day had been so hotly contested. It was done in the handsomest style. His Maine and Vermont regiments and the rest went forward on the run, and cheering as they went, swept like an avalanche through the corn-fields, fell upon the woods, cleared them in ten minutes, and held them. They were not again retaken. The field and its ghastly harvest which the Reaper had gathered in those fatal hours remained finally with us. Four times it had been lost and won. The dead are strewn so thickly that as you ride over it you cannot guide your horse's steps too carefully. Pale a
ous cities and military positions that have been captured by our armies, and to speedily crush the rebellion that still exists in several of the Southern States, thus practically restoring to the civilized world out great and good Government. All believe that the decisive moment is near at hand, and to that end the people of the United States are desirous to aid promptly in furnishing all reinforcements that you may deem needful to sustain our Government. Israel Washburne, Jr., Governor of Maine. N. S. Berry, Governor of New-Hampshire. Frederick Holbrook, Governor of Vermont. Wm. A. Buckingham, Governor of Connecticut. E. D. Morgan, Governor of New-York. Chas. S. Olden, Governor of New-Jersey. A. G. Curtin, Governor of Pennsylvania. A. W. Bradford, Governor of Maryland. F. H. Pierpont, Governor of Virginia. Austin Blair, Governor of Michigan. J. B. Temple, President Military Board of Kentucky. Andrew Johnson, Governor of Tennessee. H. R. Gamble, Governor of Missouri. O.