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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 2 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 5. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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ty are alike fatal. And now he stands forth the most conspicuous enemy of that unhappy Territory. As the tyranny of the British King is all renewed in the President, so are renewed on this floor the old indignities which embittered and fomented the troubles of our fathers. The early petition of the American Congress to Parliament, long before any suggestion of Independence, was opposed—like the petitions of Kansas—because that body was assembled without any requisition on the part of the Supreme Power. Another petition from New York, presented by Edmund Burke, was flatly rejected, as claiming rights derogatory to Parliament. And still another petition from Massachusetts Bay was dismissed as vexatious and scandalous, while the patriot philosopher who bore it was exposed to peculiar contumely. Throughout the debates our fathers were made the butt of sorry jest and supercilious assumption. And now these scenes, with these precise objections, are renewed in the American Sena
which imposed it. The ensuing discussion resulted in the establishment of a House of Deputies, in which every town was represented. thenceforth the Council of Assistants in conjunction with the House of Deputies formed the General Court of Massachusetts Bay. Thus the building of a wooden palisade from Ash Street to Jarvis Field furnished the occasion for the first great assertion of the principles of constitutional law and free government in New England. Two years before the issue of that ill one small colony could hardly be expected to hold two such potent and masterful spirits as Thomas Hooker and John Cotton. But the root of the trouble was evidently something deeper and more important than personal jealousy. The colony in Massachusetts Bay had adopted the policy of restricting the suffrage to members of the Congregational church. This policy was primarily intended to keep out Episcopalians and other malignants. The subsequent conduct of Hooker's people shows that they disap
Cambridge town, 1750-1846. Andrew McFarland Davis. The period in the history of Cambridge which we are about to consider naturally divides itself into two portions, the line of separation between which is furnished by the Revolution. The marked differences in the career of the town, caused by its change from a township in the Royal Province of Massachusetts Bay to one of the fundamental parts which constituted the State of Massachusetts, would attract the attention of the most casual observer. Geographically it had already been greatly reduced in area. During the period which we are considering it was to be still further curtailed by the incorporation of Brighton and West Cambridge as separate townships, while as a slight compensation the area along the river west of Sparks Street was to be taken from Watertown and added to the jurisdiction of Cambridge. As we first view the town in 1750, there is much that is picturesque in the placid life of its inhabitants, who numbere
ontinuance of the history must include the churches, which have had a goodly part in making the town and the city. The founders of the town were men of the church. The first settlers in these parts had come from a land where the church and the state were closely united, and they intended to keep their places in both while they found homes in this new world. They were loyal to the institutions under which they had been born. Their thought proved impracticable. The first churches in Massachusetts Bay soon severed their connection with the English Church, as the men of Plymouth had done before they left England. Afterwards, the colonies declared themselves independent of the government also. The original plan, to make the town here the metropolis of the province, was abandoned. Still, the settlement was highly respectable. It was one of the best towns in New England, and it is reported that most of the inhabitants were very rich. In England, many of them had been under the mini
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: the historians, 1607-1783 (search)
st rank among the earliest writers of their kind. They wrote quite as much as Captain John Smith, and their writings are more to be esteemed. No one has cast doubts on the accuracy of William Bradford, of Plymouth, or of John Winthrop, of Massachusetts Bay. While not historical compositions as such, their books are, in vivid and sustained human interest, as well as in the power of depicting the conditions of the first settlements, a most adequate and successful kind of history. Each is a jo the world yet been submerged by the modern deluge of imaginative literature. It was in 1764, while Hume and Robertson were at the height of their freshly won fame, that Hutchinson published the first volume of his History of the colony of Massachusetts Bay. The second was in preparation when the Stamp Act mob destroyed the house of the author. Among the debris recovered from the streets was the soiled manuscript of this volume. It was completed and published in 1767. The third volume was
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: American political writing, 1760-1789 (search)
e revenue schooner Gaspke (1772) occasioned hardly more than local excitement. Colonial newspapers continued to print essays on American rights, and houses of assembly embodied their views in resolutions; but these occasional writings, while doubtless not without their influence upon public opinion, hardly constitute a political literature of importance. To this early period of revolutionary agitation belong also the first two volumes of Thomas Hutchinson's History of the colony of Massachusetts Bay (1764-67) See also Book I, Chap. II. and the famous Hutchinson Letters, which, although not made public until 1773, date from 1768-69. Written by Hutchinson, previous to his governorship, to a friend in England, the Letters discuss events in Massachusetts from the point of view of a loyalist official who, deeply attached to the colony, was also deeply concerned at the grave course which affairs were taking, and who could honestly declare: I wish the good of the colony when I
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
n, 97 History of New England (Gookin), 25 History of New England (Hubbard), 25, 27 History of New England, a (Withrop), 22, 23 n. History of New Jersey, 27 History of New York (Smith), 27 History of New York (Knickerbocker), 247, 251, 254 History of North Carolina, 26 History of Plymouth plantation, the, 20, 21 History of printing in America, 112 n. History of the American Theatre, 228 n. History of the colonial Church, 20 History of the colony of Massachusetts Bay, 29, 30, 37 n., 133 History of the Congregational churches in the United States, 52 n. History of the first discovery and settlement of Virginia, 27 History of the five Indian nations, 26 History of the middle ages, 250 History of the Navy of the United States of America, 302 History of the New York stage, 227 n. History of the nine worthies, 11 History of the Pequot War, 24 History of the Philadelphia stage, 221 History of the world, 154 History of Virg
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
iterature, the part which has been thought worthy of inclusion in the standard edition of his collected works fills three of the seven volumes. Much of this writing is controversial in character, like the early tract on Justice and Expediency, but the greater part of it belongs to the permanent literature of New England history and thought. The most important titles are The stranger in Lowell, The Supernaturalism of New England, Leaves from Margaret Smith's journal in the province of Massachusetts Bay, and Literary Recreations and miscellanies. The story of Margaret Smith is almost a work of fiction. It recounts the imagined observations of a young woman who comes from England on a visit to the Bay Colony in its early days. She meets the chief worthies of the time, describes the landscape and the crude pioneer life, and writes of witch-hunting, Quaker-baiting, and Indian warfare. G. R. Carpenter says of this work that no single modern volume could be found which has so penetrat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 23: writers of familiar verse (search)
Holmes, the Wendell being the maiden name of his mother, descended from an Evert Jansen Wendell who had been one of the early settlers of Albany; and thus her son could claim a remote relationship with the Dutch poet Vondel: And Vondel was a Wendell who spelt it with a V. Through his father, the Calvinist minister, and his grandfather, a physician who had served in the Revolution with the Continental troops, Holmes was descended from Anne, daughter of Thomas Dudley, governor of Massachusetts Bay, and wife of Simon Bradstreet, twice governor of the province. For Anne Bradstreet, see Book I, Chap. IX. The author of the Autocrat shared with R. H. Dana, author of Two years before the Mast, the honour of descent from this literary ancestress. Holmes was born in Cambridge, in an old gambrel-roofed house that had served as General Ward's headquarters at the outbreak of the Revolution: The plan for fortifying Bunker's Hill was laid, as commonly believed, in the southeast room, th
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
9, 291, 303, 304, 311, 312, 314, 327, 328, 329, 331– 46, 348 Larcom, Lucy, 282, 286, 399, 402, 406, 408 Last leaf, the, 227, 237, 239 Latane, Capt., William, 305 Late Mrs. Null, The, 386 Lathrop, George Parsons, 283 Laurens, John, 308 Lauriger Horatius, 295 Laus Deo (Whittier), 50, 283 Lea, I., 173 Leaflets of memory, 172, 175 Lear, Edward, 408 Leaves of Grass, 258, 264 n., 265, 267, 270, 271, 272 Leaves from Margaret Smith's journal in the province of Massachusetts Bay, 52 Lee, R. E., 281, 290, 306, 308, 316 Lee, 308 Lee to the Rear, 308 Legend of Monte del Diablo, 378 Legend of Sleepy Hollow, 401 Legends and lyrics, 311 Legends of New England, in prose and verse, 45 Lehigh University, 393 Leicester, Earl of, 140 Leigh, Frances Butler, 314 Leland, Charles Godfrey, 167 Lenore, 67 Leslie, Eliza, 398, 399 Letter to B——(Poe), 63 Letters of Major Jack Downing, 151 Lewis, Mrs., 66 Lewis Carroll. See Dodgson, C. L.
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